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News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Vienna, Vir., May 03, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, the Jane Goodall Institute’s board of directors announced that as of March 21, 2017, Carlos Drews, who has a doctorate in zoology, joined the Jane Goodall Institute as the organization’s executive director. In this role, Drews is responsible for advancing the mission of the Institute building on the legacy of Dr. Jane Goodall, the organization's founder and UN Messenger of Peace. This mission includes promoting understanding and protection of great apes and their habitat, and inspiring individual action by young people of all ages to help animals, other people and to protect the world we all share. As he joins the Institute, Drews will be responsible for leading the organization’s staff of more than 200 conservation professionals in Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Uganda, Tanzania and the United States. On his new post Drews comments, “Having worked all my life with passion in the field of conservation stewardship, the position as JGI’s executive director is the most rewarding role I can play — allowing me to continue to work with African great apes specifically, and to build on my convictions about community-based conservation and the power of the young generation to shape a better world.” Prior to taking on his current role at the Institute, Drews spent 13 years working for the World Wildlife Fund. Most recently, Drews served as the global director of species conservation at WWF International in Switzerland where he was responsible for engaging governments, NGOs, corporations and donors to rally behind a joint marine & terrestrial species conservation agenda. Previously at WWF, Latin-America & the Caribbean, Drews headed the regional species and fisheries team where he was instrumental in reducing the amount of sea turtles injured by long-line fishing in the Eastern Pacific. As a child, Drews dreamed of studying animals in Africa. He realized this dream years later when he arrived in Tanzania as a graduate student researching psychological warfare in baboon communities – a study that earned him the John Napier Medal of the Primate Society of Great Britain. “Great apes are exposed to habitat loss, disease, poaching and other threats," Drews remarks on threats to great apes. "They are a sensitive litmus test for our relationship with fellow creatures on Earth, given their close proximity to us: if we do not fix the way we treat and respect our closest living relatives, what chance may other animals have, I wonder?" A native of Colombia, Drews earned his doctorate from the University of Cambridge and has carried out research into wildlife behavioral ecology in Africa and Latin America, which includes research on the behavioral ecology of primates as well as caimans. He also holds a masters in biology from Munich’s Ludwig-Maximilians as well as a masters in applied biology from the University of Cambridge. A longtime admirer of Jane Goodall and her work, Drews works to preserve and build on Goodall’s legacy at the helm her namesake Institute. Working with a talented staff located all over the world, Drews unites the Institute's team and positions it to ensure long-term success of their conservation efforts. Reflecting on his new work with Goodall, Drews shares, “Remarkably for me, this position gives me the opportunity to be mentored by an outstanding conservation leader that I have very much admired for at least three decades. I feel strongly committed and determined to equip JGI to move sustainably towards Jane Goodall´s vision.” The Jane Goodall Institute is a global community conservation organization that advances the vision and work of Dr. Jane Goodall. By protecting chimpanzees and inspiring action to conserve the natural world we all share, we improve the lives of people, animals and the environment. Founded in 1977 by Dr. Goodall, JGI makes a difference through community-centered conservation and the innovative use of science and technology. We work closely with local communities around the world, inspiring hope through the collective power of individual action. Through Roots & Shoots, our youth-led community action and learning program, young people in nearly 100 countries are acquiring the knowledge and skills to become compassionate conservation leaders in their own backyards. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/2200ee70-f2ac-4b1f-bc26-c6ba39814739 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f06504b5-3a3c-4684-b56b-08f823769d97 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/fda04319-5edf-421c-82d6-e0abadb9623b


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Vienna, Vir., May 03, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, the Jane Goodall Institute’s board of directors announced that as of March 21, 2017, Carlos Drews, who has a doctorate in zoology, joined the Jane Goodall Institute as the organization’s executive director. In this role, Drews is responsible for advancing the mission of the Institute building on the legacy of Dr. Jane Goodall, the organization's founder and UN Messenger of Peace. This mission includes promoting understanding and protection of great apes and their habitat, and inspiring individual action by young people of all ages to help animals, other people and to protect the world we all share. As he joins the Institute, Drews will be responsible for leading the organization’s staff of more than 200 conservation professionals in Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Uganda, Tanzania and the United States. On his new post Drews comments, “Having worked all my life with passion in the field of conservation stewardship, the position as JGI’s executive director is the most rewarding role I can play — allowing me to continue to work with African great apes specifically, and to build on my convictions about community-based conservation and the power of the young generation to shape a better world.” Prior to taking on his current role at the Institute, Drews spent 13 years working for the World Wildlife Fund. Most recently, Drews served as the global director of species conservation at WWF International in Switzerland where he was responsible for engaging governments, NGOs, corporations and donors to rally behind a joint marine & terrestrial species conservation agenda. Previously at WWF, Latin-America & the Caribbean, Drews headed the regional species and fisheries team where he was instrumental in reducing the amount of sea turtles injured by long-line fishing in the Eastern Pacific. As a child, Drews dreamed of studying animals in Africa. He realized this dream years later when he arrived in Tanzania as a graduate student researching psychological warfare in baboon communities – a study that earned him the John Napier Medal of the Primate Society of Great Britain. “Great apes are exposed to habitat loss, disease, poaching and other threats," Drews remarks on threats to great apes. "They are a sensitive litmus test for our relationship with fellow creatures on Earth, given their close proximity to us: if we do not fix the way we treat and respect our closest living relatives, what chance may other animals have, I wonder?" A native of Colombia, Drews earned his doctorate from the University of Cambridge and has carried out research into wildlife behavioral ecology in Africa and Latin America, which includes research on the behavioral ecology of primates as well as caimans. He also holds a masters in biology from Munich’s Ludwig-Maximilians as well as a masters in applied biology from the University of Cambridge. A longtime admirer of Jane Goodall and her work, Drews works to preserve and build on Goodall’s legacy at the helm her namesake Institute. Working with a talented staff located all over the world, Drews unites the Institute's team and positions it to ensure long-term success of their conservation efforts. Reflecting on his new work with Goodall, Drews shares, “Remarkably for me, this position gives me the opportunity to be mentored by an outstanding conservation leader that I have very much admired for at least three decades. I feel strongly committed and determined to equip JGI to move sustainably towards Jane Goodall´s vision.” The Jane Goodall Institute is a global community conservation organization that advances the vision and work of Dr. Jane Goodall. By protecting chimpanzees and inspiring action to conserve the natural world we all share, we improve the lives of people, animals and the environment. Founded in 1977 by Dr. Goodall, JGI makes a difference through community-centered conservation and the innovative use of science and technology. We work closely with local communities around the world, inspiring hope through the collective power of individual action. Through Roots & Shoots, our youth-led community action and learning program, young people in nearly 100 countries are acquiring the knowledge and skills to become compassionate conservation leaders in their own backyards. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/2200ee70-f2ac-4b1f-bc26-c6ba39814739 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f06504b5-3a3c-4684-b56b-08f823769d97 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/fda04319-5edf-421c-82d6-e0abadb9623b


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

Google Earth gets revival with tools for exploration (AP) — Google Earth is getting a revival, with the 3-D mapping service becoming more of a tool for adventure and exploration. A central feature in the new Google Earth is Voyager. Google has partnered with such groups as the BBC, NASA and the producers of "Sesame Street" to mix in video clips, photos and text narratives. The Jane Goodall Institute, for instance, lets you journey to spots in Tanzania that inspired the chimpanzee expert. Before Google Maps brought in real-world imagery, Google Earth was the place to go to for satellite views and 3-D images stitched together from aerial fly-bys. A software download was required, limiting its use. With the update, Google Earth now works on desktop browsers. Google has a mobile app for Android but not iPhones or iPads yet.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: phys.org

A central feature in the new Google Earth is Voyager. Google has partnered with such groups as the BBC and NASA to add video clips, photos and text narratives to three-dimensional representations of particular locations. The Jane Goodall Institute, for instance, lets you journey to spots in Tanzania that inspired its founding chimpanzee expert. You can also get overlays of chimpanzee ranges and compare imagery from 2005 and 2014 to see the effects of forest restoration efforts. The producers of "Sesame Street" show off Muppets from co-productions around the world; the map shows where the Muppets live and offer stories about the region and its culture. Separately, a new "I'm Feeling Lucky" feature takes you to a location selected at random. Google Earth is highlighting some 20,000 lesser-known destinations—the kinds of places locals might frequent or know about, such as the Indonesian island of Bunaken , part of a national marine park. Google Earth used to be the place to go to for satellite views and 3-D images stitched together from aerial fly-bys. A software download was required, limiting its use. Google Maps has incorporated many of those features, making Google Earth even less necessary. Tuesday's update is about giving you a reason to use Google Earth again. Google says that while Maps is about getting you to a destination, Earth is about immersing you there, or "getting lost." With the update, Google Earth now works on Google's Chrome browsers for desktops. It still requires an app for phones and tablets because of the heavy graphics involved; Google is rolling out updates for Android, but there's no Google Earth app for iPhones or iPads yet. Some older features will still require a software download on desktops. That includes maps of Mars and the moon through a partnership with NASA. Google also announced an update to a virtual-reality version of Google Earth. It now works with Facebook's Oculus Rift, not just the HTC Vive. But it won't work with cheaper, phone-based VR systems, such as Google's Daydream and Samsung's Gear VR. Explore further: Google brings Earth into better focus


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

Google Earth invites you to 'get lost' exploring the planet (AP) — Google Earth is getting a revival, as the 3-D mapping service reorients itself to become more of a tool for adventure and exploration. A central feature in the new Google Earth is Voyager. Google has partnered with such groups as the BBC and NASA to add video clips, photos and text narratives to three-dimensional representations of particular locations. The Jane Goodall Institute, for instance, lets you journey to spots in Tanzania that inspired its founding chimpanzee expert. You can also get overlays of chimpanzee ranges and compare imagery from 2005 and 2014 to see the effects of forest restoration efforts. The producers of "Sesame Street" show off Muppets from co-productions around the world; the map shows where the Muppets live and offer stories about the region and its culture. Separately, a new "I'm Feeling Lucky" feature takes you to a location selected at random. Google Earth is highlighting some 20,000 lesser-known destinations — the kinds of places locals might frequent or know about, such as the Indonesian island of Bunaken , part of a national marine park. Google Earth used to be the place to go to for satellite views and 3-D images stitched together from aerial fly-bys. A software download was required, limiting its use. Google Maps has incorporated many of those features, making Google Earth even less necessary. Tuesday's update is about giving you a reason to use Google Earth again. Google says that while Maps is about getting you to a destination, Earth is about immersing you there, or "getting lost." With the update, Google Earth now works on Google's Chrome browsers for desktops. It still requires an app for phones and tablets because of the heavy graphics involved; Google is rolling out updates for Android, but there's no Google Earth app for iPhones or iPads yet. Some older features will still require a software download on desktops. That includes maps of Mars and the moon through a partnership with NASA. Google also announced an update to a virtual-reality version of Google Earth. It now works with Facebook's Oculus Rift, not just the HTC Vive. But it won't work with cheaper, phone-based VR systems, such as Google's Daydream and Samsung's Gear VR.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.treehugger.com

Google Earth has always been our favorite way to explore the world from the comfort of our desks. Being able to click on places of the globe and zoom down to see it up close is incredibly fun and Google has released updates and layers over the years that let us gather more information as we clicked around. Now, with a refresh on the software, Google Earth is becoming first and foremost a destination for deep exploration, not just satellite views. Google revealed the update yesterday, which includes a new Voyager feature created just for us desktop adventurers. Voyager was created through a partnership with several organizations like the BBC and NASA to create guided tours to the world's amazing places. Videos, photos and text narratives added to 3-D representations of areas around the world allow users to fully immerse themselves in a place. The Jane Goodall Institute provided tours of Gombe National Park in Tanzania where Goodall has done much of her research on chimpanzees. Goodall provides field notes, as shown below. For the kid in you, Sesame Street joined with the tech company to map places where Muppets productions happen around the world and the Muppets offer facts about the region and the culture there. Because this is Google, of course there is an "I'm Feeling Lucky" button. Clicking this will randomly take you to one of 20,000 lesser-known, but fascinating locations around the world. Many of these spots are known and loved by locals, but not as well known by the rest of us. The other significant update is that Google Earth will now work on Google Chrome Browsers, no need for the desktop app anymore. For smartphones and tablets you'll still the need app though because of the huge graphics. The Android app is already being updated with the new features, but the iOS version is still being worked on. Google also updated the virtual reality version of the app which works with the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive. What will you explore first on the new Google Earth?


Gilby I.C.,Duke University | Brent L.J.N.,Duke University | Wroblewski E.E.,Stanford University | Rudicell R.S.,University of Alabama at Birmingham | And 3 more authors.
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology | Year: 2013

Coalitionary aggression occurs when at least two individuals jointly direct aggression at one or more conspecific targets. Scientists have long argued that this common form of cooperation has positive fitness consequences. Nevertheless, despite evidence that social bond strength (which is thought to promote coalition formation) is correlated with fitness in primates, cetaceans, and ungulates, few studies have directly examined whether coalitionary aggression improves reproductive success. We tested the hypothesis that among free-ranging chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii), participation in coalitionary aggression increases reproductive output. Using 14 years of genetic and behavioral data from Gombe National Park, Tanzania, we found that coalitionary aggression increased a male's chances of (A) siring offspring, compared to other males of similar dominance rank, and (B) ascending in rank, a correlate of future reproductive output. Because male chimpanzees form coalitions with many others within a complex network, we used social network analysis to identify the types of connections correlated with these fitness benefits. The beneficiaries of coalitionary aggression were males with the highest "betweenness"-that is, those who tended to have coalition partners who themselves did not form coalitions with each other. This suggests that beyond simply recognizing third-party relationships, chimpanzees may use this knowledge to choose coalition partners. If so, this is a significant step forward in our knowledge of the adaptive value of social intelligence. Regardless of mechanism, however, this is the first evidence of genetic benefits of coalitionary aggression in this species, and therefore has important implications for understanding the evolution of cooperation. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Arcadi A.C.,Cornell University | Wallauer W.,The Jane Goodall Institute
International Journal of Primatology | Year: 2013

The role learning plays in the acquisition of communicative gestures by wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) is unclear. We aimed to evaluate the likelihood that social experience influences the structure of chimpanzee buttress drumming displays by examining whether individuals differed in the way they used their hands and feet to strike trees. We analyzed digital video recordings of 245 bouts by 9 adult males from Gombe National Park, Tanzania, frame by frame in conjunction with acoustic analysis. We investigated 1) how limb sequences used to approach drumming trees influenced limb use during drumming, 2) the relative use of hands vs. feet in drumming, and 3) the relative amplitude of beats produced by hands vs. feet. We found that the chimpanzees most often approached trees at a gallop and usually initiated drumming bouts with limb sequences that were identical to gait limb sequences. All individuals produced more beats with their feet than with their hands, and foot beats were higher in relative amplitude than hand beats. In only one instance did an individual produce a bout with hands only, whereas in three of nine observations of drumming on resonant camp equipment, the individuals primarily used their hands rather than their feet. We suggest that although chimpanzees may, by observing others, learn to use buttresses as tools to generate loud sounds, it is unlikely that learning influences the structure of displays because they result from innately determined gait patterns deployed to generate sound from comparatively nonresonant substrates. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Gilby I.C.,Arizona State University | Machanda Z.P.,Harvard University | Mjungu D.C.,The Jane Goodall Institute | Rosen J.,Harvard University | And 3 more authors.
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences | Year: 2015

Even when hunting in groups is mutually beneficial, it is unclear howcommunal hunts are initiated. If it is costly to be the only hunter, individuals should be reluctant to hunt unless others already are. We used 70 years of data from three communities to examine how male chimpanzees ‘solve’ this apparent collective action problem. The ‘impact hunter’ hypothesis proposes that group hunts are sometimes catalysed by certain individuals that hunt more readily than others. In two communities (Kasekela and Kanyawara), we identified a total of five males that exhibited high hunt participation rates for their age, and whose presence at an encounter with red colobus monkeys increased group hunting probability. Critically, these impact hunters were observed to hunt first more often than expected by chance. We argue that by hunting first, these males dilute prey defences and create opportunities for previously reluctant participants. This by-product mutualism can explain variation in group hunting rates within and between social groups. Hunting rates declined after the death of impact hunter FG in Kasekela and after impact hunter MS stopped hunting frequently in Kanyawara. There were no impact hunters in the third, smaller community (Mitumba), where, unlike the others, hunting probability increased with the number of females present at an encounter with prey. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: FIELD STATIONS | Award Amount: 329.17K | Year: 2016

The Gombe Stream Research Centre (GSRC) was established in Tanzania by Dr. Jane Goodall in 1965 to support and maintain her pioneering study of chimpanzees, initiated in 1960. Now in its 56th year, the Gombe chimpanzee study is one of the longest and most detailed continuous studies of any free-living species. GSRC is a core project of the Jane Goodall Institute, one of the most well-known research and conservation organizations in the world. Research at GSRC has revealed the complex social behavior and cognitive abilities of chimpanzees including tool-making and use, group-hunting, cooperation in inter-group competition and enduring family bonds and social relationships, all of which have relevance to the understanding of human evolution. In addition, GSRC research informs community-centered conservation programs near Gombe and across Africa. Given the unparalleled depth of behavioral data, there has been growing interest from scientists in diverse fields in conducting broad, inter-disciplinary research at Gombe, to increase understanding of diet, physiology, health and disease. However, the GSRC infrastructure has been built piecemeal over the years and cannot support modern research or large trans-disciplinary teams. This project will extend and update the facilities by providing reliable power and renovating existing structures to provide state-of-the-art laboratory facilities for visiting scientists. Improvement of the facilities will improve current and future visiting researchers efficiency in all their research projects, and will enable the training of Tanzanian scientists and veterinarians through hands-on experience with indigenous species. A better power supply and improved internet connectivity will facilitate more immediate communication of scientific data and events at Gombe to collaborators and students overseas, as well as in local classrooms. A new library and museum space with power sources capable of supporting video displays will greatly improve the educational experiences of visiting students, school groups, and tourists.

The provision of modern lab facilities at this iconic site will enable transformative research through coupling the exceptionally deep knowledge of the primates and the habitat with new techniques to detect and measure disease agents and disease progression in situ, endocrine levels, characteristics of bone, and nutritional and isotopic characteristics of dietary items. Improved power and communication will support all ongoing research projects and allow for greater synergy between them. The expansion and renovation will feature 1) reliable electrical power through new solar and backup generator systems, 2) wet laboratory space equipped with freezers for sample storage and basic equipment for genetic, endocrine, and nutritional analysis, 3) dry storage and work space for an herbarium and for the uniquely extensive skeletal collections of individual chimpanzees and baboons of known developmental and life histories, 4) a necropsy lab, 5) a space for meetings, and 6) a small museum. Information on the core research projects conducted at Gombe can be found at www.gombechimpanzees.org.

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