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Stotesbury T.,Trent University | Illes M.,Trent University | Jermy M.,University of Canterbury | Taylor M.,The Institute of Environmental Science and Research | And 2 more authors.
Forensic Science International | Year: 2016

This research uses high-speed video analysis of bloodstain impact events to investigate the influence of impact velocity, fluid depth and free-space on the characteristics of the mechanism. We focus on the changes in the crown growth over time. This work demonstrates qualitative differences in the impact mechanism under a range of impact conditions. These differences are further explained quantitatively as a function of measured crown width and height lengths over time. Fluid dynamic explanations of this growth are featured in the results and discussion. A comparison to water dynamics is reported. Our image analysis demonstrates that droplets are consistently formed at points which are different from the impactor/fluid interface and that this difference is fluid dependent. This fluid dependency demonstrates the importance of accurately modeling fluid dynamics of blood when designing and deploying blood substitutes in forensics applications. © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd


Peacey M.,The Institute of Environmental Science and Research | Hall R.J.,The Institute of Environmental Science and Research | Sonnberg S.,The Institute of Environmental Science and Research | Sonnberg S.,Stjude Childrens Research Hospital | And 10 more authors.
Emerging Infectious Diseases | Year: 2010

Co-infection with seasonal infl uenza A (H1N1) and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 could result in reassortant viruses that may acquire new characteristics of transmission, virulence, and oseltamivir susceptibility. Results from oseltamivir-sensitivity testing on viral culture suggested the possibility of co-infections with oseltamivir-resistant (seasonal A [H1N1]) and -susceptible (pandemic [H1N1] 2009) viruses.


Peacey M.,The Institute of Environmental Science and Research | Hall R.J.,The Institute of Environmental Science and Research | Wang J.,The Institute of Environmental Science and Research | Todd A.K.,The Institute of Environmental Science and Research | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Enterovirus 74 (EV74) is a rarely detected viral infection of children. In 2010, EV74 was identified in New Zealand in a 2 year old child with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) through routine polio AFP surveillance. A further three cases of EV74 were identified in children within six months. These cases are the first report of EV74 in New Zealand. In this study we describe the near complete genome sequence of four EV74 isolates from New Zealand, which shows only limited sequence identity in the non-structural proteins when compared to the other two known EV74 sequences. As is typical of enteroviruses multiple recombination events were evident, particularly in the P2 region and P3 regions. This is the first complete EV74 genome sequenced from a patient with acute flaccid paralysis. © 2013 Peacey et al.

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