The Institute of Cetacean Research

Chūō-ku, Japan

The Institute of Cetacean Research

Chūō-ku, Japan

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News Article | August 25, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

The founder of a radical conservation group made famous by the television show "Whale Wars" says a settlement over anti-whaling activities only prevents the group's U.S. organization from interfering with Japanese whalers in the Southern Ocean. This week, Japan's Institute of Cetacean Research and a whale ship operator announced they'd reached an agreement with Sea Shepherd Conservation Society and its founder Paul Watson. "What it means is Sea Shepherd USA cannot contribute money toward the Southern Ocean campaign, cannot be involved in the Southern Ocean campaign, and that's fine. We've got plenty of other campaigns to do," said Watson, who recently returned to the U.S. and is living in Vermont. But he said the settlement doesn't affect the group's other entities. "Whether Sea Shepherd Australia or Sea Shepherd Global ... if they intend to return to the Southern Ocean that's their business, it's not ours and I can't control them," he said of the settlement filed on Tuesday. The Institute of Cetacean Research, which studies whales, also is paying an undisclosed amount to the anti-whaling group on the condition the money will not be transferred to its affiliates elsewhere, including in Australia, one of the most active in attacking Japanese whalers during their hunts in the Antarctic. Officials in Japan are hoping the funding restriction will somehow limit the extent of Sea Shepherd's activities in Australia. Agriculture Minister Yuji Yamamoto on Thursday welcomed the agreement, saying, "I take it as a positive development that would contribute to the safety of the research whaling fleet." Yamamoto, however, said that Japanese whalers should continue to use caution and be aware that there are staunch opponents of whaling. Sea Shepherd Global media director Heather Stimmler said all of its entities around the world — except those in the United States — will continue to oppose what it believes is illegal Japanese whaling in the Antarctic. The International Whaling Commission imposed a commercial ban on whaling in 1986, but Japan has continued to kill whales under an exemption for what the country says is research. Interpol lists Watson as being wanted in Japan on charges of conspiracy to trespass on a whaling ship and interference with business, and in Costa Rica on a charge of interfering with a shark finning operation. Watson was arrested in Germany but then fled to France when he heard that he would be extradited to Japan. In his home office in landlocked Vermont, surrounded by artifacts from his journeys, the 65-year-old Watson said he will continue to coordinate with other Sea Shepherd entities. He's also writing several books and is involved in future television programs. Associated Press writer Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo contributed to this report. Content Item Type: NewsSummary: The founder of a radical conservation group made famous by a television show says a settlement over anti-whaling activities only prevents the group's U.S. organization from interfering with Japanese whalers in the Southern Ocean. Featured Image: Contributed Author: By Lisa Rathke, Associated PressMeta Keywords: Sea Shepherd, Southern Ocean, Sea Shepherd Global, Japanese whalers, Southern Ocean campaign, Sea Shepherd Conservation, Sea Shepherd USA, International Whaling Commission, Sea Shepherd Australia, founder Paul Watson, Sea Shepherd entities, Cetacean Research, Shepherd Global media, radical conservation group, whale ship operator, Minister Yuji Yamamoto, Japanese whaling, writer Mari Yamaguchi, shark finning operation, director Heather Stimmler, future television programs, 65-year-old Watson, Whale Wars, U.S. organization, anti-whaling activities, staunch opponents, anti-whaling group, funding restriction, positive development, United States, commercial ban, home office, Costa Rica, settlement, Antarctic, agreement, whales, money, business, Vermont, exemption, caution, Interpol, Society, extent, interference, condition, hunts, plenty, AgricultureExclusive: 


PubMed | Showa University, Hoshi University, The Institute of Cetacean Research and Josai University
Type: | Journal: Genomics data | Year: 2016

This study investigates effects of dipeptide balenine, as a major component of whale meat extract (hereafter, WME), supplementation on senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8), an Alzheimers disease (AD) model at level of learning and memory formation and brain expression profiles genome-wide in brain. Mice fed experimental balenine (+WME) supplemented diet for 26weeks were subjected to four behavioral tests - open field, Y-maze, new object recognition, and water-filled multiple T-maze - to examine effects on learning and memory. Brain transcriptome of SAMP8 mice-fed the WME diet over control low-safflower oil (LSO) diet-fed mice was delineated on a 444K mouse whole genome DNA microarray chip. Results revealed the WME diet not only induced improvements in the learning and memory formation but also positively modulated changes in the brain of the SAMP8 mouse; the gene inventories are publically available for analysis by the scientific community. Interestingly, the SAMP8 mouse model presented many genetic characteristics of AD, and numerous novel molecules (Slc2a5, Treh, Fbp1, Aldob, Ppp1r1a, DNase1, Agxt2l1, Cyp2e1, Acsm1, Acsm2, and Pah) were revealed over the SAMR1 (senescence-accelerated mouse resistant 1) mouse, to be oppositely regulated/recovered under the balenine (+WME) supplemented diet regime by DNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses. Our present study demonstrates an experimental strategy to understand the effects of dipeptide balenine, prominetly contained in meat diet, on SAMP8, providing new insight into whole brain transcriptome changes genome-wide. The gene expression data has been deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO): GSE76459. The data will be a valuable resource in examining the effects of natural products, and which could also serve as a human model for further functional analysis and investigation.


Bhuiyan M.M.U.,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine | Bhuiyan M.M.U.,Bangladesh Agricultural University | Suzuki Y.,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine | Watanabe H.,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Reproduction and Development | Year: 2010

The objectives of this study were to choose an effective embryo reconstruction method and an effective post- activation agent for in vitro production of sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis) interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) embryos. Moreover, trichostatin A (TSA) treatment of whale iSCNT embryos was performed to improve the in vitro embryo development. In Experiment 1, the fusion rate was significantly higher (88.1%) in embryos reconstructed using the intracytoplasmic cell injection method (ICI) than that (48.7%) in the subzonal cell insertion (SUZI) counterpart. The rates of pseudopronucleus (PPN) formation (77.4 vs. 77.2%) and cleavage (24.5 vs. 37.0%) did not vary between ICI and SUZI. However, the PPN formation and cleavage rates were significantly (P<0.05) lower in the iSCNT embryos than in the parthenogenetic control (95.7% and 64.4%, respectively). Although 21.5% of the bovine parthenogenetic embryos developed to the blastocyst stage, no iSCNT embryo developed beyond the 6-cell stage. In Experiment 2, the cleavage rate did not vary between the TSA (50 nM)-treated and non-treated whale iSCNT embryos (30.5 vs. 32.3%, respectively). Moreover, it did not vary between the TSA-treated iSCNT and SCNT embryos (30.5 vs. 32.0%, respectively). Only one TSA non-treated iSCNT embryo developed to a compacted morula with 20 nuclei. One TSA- treated whale SCNT embryo developed to the 8-cell stage, and out of five whale iSCNT embryos, a 6-cell stage embryo was positive for whale DNA. In conclusion, bovine oocytes have the ability to support development of sei whale nuclei up to the 6-cell stage. © 2010 by the Society for Reproduction and Development.


Murase H.,Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries And Environment of Inland Sea | Hakamada T.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | Matsuoka K.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | Nishiwaki S.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | And 4 more authors.
Deep-Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography | Year: 2014

The subarctic-subtropical transition area of the western North Pacific is an important summer feeding grounds of sei whales. The oceanographic structure and circulation of this area are largely determined by strong oceanic fronts and associated geostrophic currents, namely the Polar Front (PF), Subarctic Front (SAF) and Kuroshio Extension Front (KEF). The relationship between the distribution of sei whales and oceanographic fronts was investigated using a generalized additive model (GAM), and the cetacean sighting survey data and oceanographic observations in July from 2000 to 2007 were used in the analysis. The number of individual sei whales was used as the response variable while the distances from the PF, SAF, and KEF to the whales were used as explanatory variables along with the longitude values. Sei whales were concentrated north and south of the SAF and the areas from 250 to 300. km north and from 100 to 200. km south of the SAF were estimated as high-density areas of sei whales. The entire inter-frontal zone between the PF and SAF featured an elevated concentration of sei whales, and the area south of the PF and along the SAF was identified as an important feeding ground of sei whales in July from 2000 to 2007. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Murase H.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | Murase H.,Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries And Environment of Inland Sea | Kawabata A.,Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries Science | Kubota H.,Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries Science | And 5 more authors.
Fisheries Science | Year: 2012

The distribution pattern and biomass of the Japanese anchovy Engraulis japonicus in the offshore region of the western North Pacific (north of 35°N and west of 170°E) were studied using a quantitative echosounder. This is the first attempt at such a study in this region. Data were collected in summer from 2004 to 2007. The biomass was estimated using data collected at 38 kHz. Species compositions in the backscatterings from pelagic fish were assigned based on the results of trawl hauls taking account of sea surface temperature (SST). Japanese anchovy tended to be high density to the west of 153°E and were distributed in an SST range of 9-24 °C. Although the temporal and spatial coverage of the survey differed each year, at least 1.5-3.4 million tons of Japanese anchovy were present in the survey area between 2004 and 2007. To take account of the spatial coverage of the survey each year, the most reliable biomass estimate for this region in the time period was 3.4 million tons (coefficient of variation 0. 22). © 2012 The Japanese Society of Fisheries Science.


Watanabe H.,Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries And Environment of Inland Sea | Okazaki M.,Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries Science | Tamura T.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | Konishi K.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | And 4 more authors.
Fisheries Science | Year: 2012

This study represents the first quantitative analysis of the characteristics of the distribution areas and stomach contents of common minke whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata, sei whale B. borealis, and Bryde's whale B. edeni in relation to oceanographic and prey environments in mid summer in the western North Pacific. Common minke whales were distributed within subarctic regions and the northernmost region of the transitional domain, coinciding with the main habitat of their preferred prey, Pacific saury Cololabis saira. Sei whales were mainly found in the northernmost part of the transition zone and showed prey preference for Japanese anchovy Engraulis japonica, which was significantly more abundant in the main distribution area of the whale than in its adjacent areas. "Hot spots" of Bryde's whales were found in several regions of the transition zone between the subarctic boundary and the Kuroshio front. This whale species preferred Japanese anchovy as prey, for which the distribution density was significantly higher in the main distribution area of the whale than in the adjacent areas. These results indicate that the summer distributions of Pacific saury and Japanese anchovy greatly influence the distributions of these whale species, suggesting that the whales' habitat selection is closely related to their prey selection. © 2012 The Japanese Society of Fisheries Science.


Murase H.,Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries And Environment of Inland Sea | Kitakado T.,Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology | Hakamada T.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | Matsuoka K.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | And 2 more authors.
Fisheries Oceanography | Year: 2013

The spatial distribution of Antarctic minke whales in the Ross Sea with relation to spatial distributions of their prey - krill - was investigated in this study using generalized additive models (GAMs). Spatial distributions of two species of krill (ice and Antarctic krill) were estimated by GAMs. Three abiotic factors - distance from the continental shelf break (800 m isobaths), the mean temperature and salinity from the surface to 200 m (MTEM-200 and MSAL-200), and latitude and longitude - were used as covariates for models of krill. Estimated spatial distributions of krill were then used with other covariates to model the spatial distribution of Antarctic minke whales. In the selected model of Antarctic minke whales, Antarctic krill were more influential than ice krill. The number of Antarctic minke whales increased as the density of Antarctic krill increased to around 1.5 g m-2. Beyond that, the number of Antarctic minke whales decreased as the density of Antarctic krill increased. High densities of the Antarctic minke whales were estimated along the sea ice edge in the eastern part of the Ross Sea. Specifically, the densities were high in the north of the continental shelf break where low MTEM-200 and MSAL-200 and intermediate densities of Antarctic krill were observed. Further data collection is needed to investigate interannual variations and trends in their relationship. The results show that the spatial distribution of Antarctic minke whales is a function of longitude, distance from the shelf break, oceanographic condition (temperature and salinity), and densities of ice and Antarctic krill. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Murase H.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | Murase H.,Japan National Research Institute of Fisheries And Environment of Inland Sea | Tamura T.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | Otani S.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | Nishiwaki S.,The Institute of Cetacean Research
Fisheries Science | Year: 2016

Movements of two individual Bryde’s whales (Balaenoptera edeni) were recorded using satellite-monitored radio tags in the offshore western North Pacific where no such data had been recorded. One individual was recorded for 13 days 4 h 57 min from 13 to 26 July 2006. The total traveled distance of the individual was 917.3 km with a mean speed of 2.9 km/h. The other individual was recorded for 20 days 5 h 5 min from 24 July to 13 August 2008. The total traveled distance of the individual was 2649.7 km with a mean speed of 5.5 km/h. It has been documented that the subarctic-subtropical transition area (around 40°N) is one of the feeding areas of Bryde’s whales in summer. However, the results revealed that some individual Bryde’s whales moved from the subarctic-subtropical transition area to the subtropical area even in summer. The observation indicated Bryde’s whales did not stay in a feeding area persistently throughout summer. This study provides the first information regarding the continuous movement of Bryde’s whales in the offshore western North Pacific in summer which enhances understanding of their life history. © 2015, Japanese Society of Fisheries Science.


Ogawa G.,Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology | Ishida M.,Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology | Kato H.,Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology | Fujise Y.,The Institute of Cetacean Research | Urano N.,Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology
Fisheries Science | Year: 2010

There are few reports in the literature about the isolation of bacteria from whale intestine. In this report, we counted colony-forming units in the feces obtained from three female common minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata). The number of colony-forming units ranged from (2.2 ± 0.4) × 105 to (8.9 ± 2.0) × 108 per gram (wet weight) of excrement. 16S rRNA gene sequences of 141 isolates were determined. These strains were identified as Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus sp., Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter sp., Escherichia coli, Edwardsiella ictaluri or Clostridium sp. The data suggested that the facultative anaerobic population of the intestinal bacterial flora of the minke whale was similar to that of ground mammals. © The Japanese Society of Fisheries Science 2010.


Goodman D.,The Institute of Cetacean Research
Journal of International Wildlife Law and Policy | Year: 2010

This article is a critique of two reports of "independent legal experts" sponsored by the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW); the "Paris Panel" and the "London Panel." The article shows that the Paris Panel's conclusion that Japan's research whaling in the Antarctic is unlawful and an abuse of rights under the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling (ICRW) is based on misuse of evidence and failure to properly interpret Article VIII of the Convention and the legal status of recommendatory non-binding resolutions. It also shows that the London Panel's conclusion that the import of humpback whales from Japan's research program in the Antarctic and sei whales from its research program in the North Pacific are a violation of trade rules under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora is based on incorrect interpretation of that Convention's trade rules. It is concluded that the two independent legal experts panel reports are, from a legal perspective, seriously flawed, rendering their conclusions invalid and relegating the reports to the status of IFAW propaganda. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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