The Institute for Systems Biology

Seattle, WA, United States

The Institute for Systems Biology

Seattle, WA, United States

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Patent
The Institute For Systems Biology and NanoString Technologies | Date: 2013-03-11

The present invention relates to compositions and methods for detection and quantification of individual target molecules in biomolecular samples. In particular, the invention relates to coded, labeled probes that are capable of binding to and identifying target molecules based on the probes label codes. Methods of making and using such probes are also provided. The probes can be used in diagnostic, prognostic, quality control and screening applications.


Patent
NanoString Technologies and The Institute For Systems Biology | Date: 2016-05-20

The present invention relates to compositions and methods for detection and quantification of individual target molecules in biomolecular samples. In particular, the invention relates to coded, labeled probes that are capable of binding to and identifying target molecules based on the probes label codes. Methods of making and using such probes are also provided. The probes can be used in diagnostic, prognostic, quality control and screening applications.


Patent
University of Washington and The Institute For Systems Biology | Date: 2011-07-26

The invention provides methods to elicit an immune response with an immunomodulatory flagellin polypeptide having toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) binding, and further comprising an ADCC targeting molecule.


Patent
The Institute For Systems Biology | Date: 2011-03-30

The invention provides compositions and methods for identifying and/or quantifying glycopolypeptides from human serum or plasma. The compositions and methods include a plurality of standard peptides containing glycosylation sites determined for human serum/plasma proteins.


Patent
Homestead Clinical Corporation and The Institute For Systems Biology | Date: 2012-11-07

The present invention relates generally to methods for identifying and using organ-specific proteins and transcripts. The present invention further provides compositions comprising organ-specific proteins and transcripts encoding the same, detection reagents for detecting such proteins and transcripts, and diagnostic panels, kits and arrays for measuring organ-specific proteins/transcripts in blood, biological tissue or other biological fluid.


Patent
The Institute For Systems Biology | Date: 2010-06-18

The invention provides a diverse population of uniquely labeled probes, containing about thirty or more target specific nucleic acid probes each attached to a unique label bound to a nucleic acid. Also provided is a method of producing a population of uniquely labeled nucleic acid probes. The method consists of (a) synthesizing a population of target specific nucleic acid probes each having a different specifier; (b) synthesizing a corresponding population of anti-genedigits each having a unique label, the population having a diversity sufficient to uniquely hybridize to genedigits within the specifiers, and (c) hybridizing the populations of target nucleic acid probes to the anti-genedigits, to produce a population in which each of the target specific probes is uniquely labeled. Also provided is a method of detecting a nucleic acid analyte. The method consists of (a) contacting a mixture of nucleic acid analytes under conditions sufficient for hybridization with a plurality of target specific nucleic acid probes each having a different specifier; (b) contacting the mixture under conditions sufficient for hybridization with a corresponding plurality of anti-genedigits each having a unique label, the plurality of anti-genedigits having a diversity sufficient to uniquely hybridize to genedigits within the specifiers, and (c) uniquely detecting a hybridized complex between one or more analytes in the mixture, a target specific probe, and an anti-genedigit.


Patent
The Institute For Systems Biology | Date: 2010-03-12

The invention provides compositions and methods for identifying and/or quantifying glycopolypeptides from human serum or plasma. The compositions and methods include a plurality of standard peptides containing glycosylation sites determined for human serum/plasma proteins.


Patent
The Institute For Systems Biology | Date: 2010-05-13

The invention provides methods of detecting polypeptides in a sample. The method can include the steps of cleaving polypeptides in a test sample to generate peptides; adding a predetermined amount of isotopically labeled peptide standards to the cleaved test sample, wherein the peptide standards correspond to peptides cleaved with the same reagent used to cleave the test sample; contacting the cleaved test sample containing peptide standards with an array of immobilized binding agents specific for the peptide standards; washing the array to remove unbound peptides, thereby retaining affinity captured sample peptides and standard peptides; analyzing the affinity captured peptides using mass spectrometry; and determining the presence of bound test peptides and standard peptides. The method can further include the step of quantifying the amount of the test peptides by comparing the ratio of test peptide to corresponding standard peptide.


Patent
The Institute For Systems Biology | Date: 2011-03-30

The invention provides compositions and methods for identifying and/or quantifying glycopolypeptides from human serum or plasma. The compositions and methods include a plurality of standard peptides containing glycosylation sites determined for human serum/plasma proteins.


Patent
The Institute For Systems Biology | Date: 2013-03-11

The invention provides a diverse population of uniquely labeled probes, containing about thirty or more target specific nucleic acid probes each attached to a unique label bound to a nucleic acid. Also provided is a method of producing a population of uniquely labeled nucleic acid probes. Also provided is a method of detecting a nucleic acid analyte. The method consists of (a) contacting a mixture of nucleic acid analytes under conditions sufficient for hybridization with a plurality of target specific nucleic acid probes each having a different specifier; (b) contacting the mixture under conditions sufficient for hybridization with a corresponding plurality of anti-genedigits each having a unique label, the plurality of anti-genedigits having a diversity sufficient to uniquely hybridize to genedigits within the specifiers, and (c) uniquely detecting a hybridized complex between one or more analytes in the mixture, a target specific probe, and an anti-genedigit.

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