The Highway Institute

Belgrade, Serbia

The Highway Institute

Belgrade, Serbia
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Bulajic B.D.,The Highway Institute | Manic M.I.,Union University of Serbia | Ladinovic D.,University of Novi Sad
Natural Hazards | Year: 2013

Northwestern Balkans represents one of the rare regions where data on both the shallow geology (i.e., local soil conditions) and the deep geology exist for stations that recorded hundreds of strong motion records. The strong motion database used in this study consists of 203 strong motion accelerograms (each with three orthogonal translational components), recorded in former Yugoslavia in the period 1976-1983, from 108 contributing earthquakes. In this paper, the results of a series of regression analyses are presented where empirical equations for scaling pseudo-acceleration response spectra were developed on the basis of 5 subsets of data and using three prediction models. Results of the regression analyses show that for ground motion in the horizontal direction, both the shallow and deep geology site conditions have to be taken into account or else the spectral estimates might be considerably biased. Results show that the shallow geology influences spectral amplitudes the most in the short period range and has much lesser effects for larger periods, while the influence of the deep geology is expressed in a wider range of intermediate to long periods. Results also show that if the prediction model that considers solely the shallow geology effects is used, the spectral peaks that have been related to the deep geology effects will completely vanish for larger source-to-site distances, while in the case when solely the deep geology is considered, the peaks related to the shallow geology will not be visible for any distance. As for the amplitudes in the vertical direction, although both the shallow and the deep geology effects are less expressed than in the horizontal one, they still cannot be neglected-the deep geology effects are visible for a wider range of vibration periods, while the shallow geology has some effects only for periods smaller than ~0.3 s. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Abolmasov B.,University of Belgrade | Milenkovic S.,Geomonitoring Team | Marjanovic M.,University of Belgrade | Jelisavac B.,The Highway Institute
Landslides | Year: 2015

This paper describes a characteristic landslide model for landslides typically hosted in Neogene formations in Serbia, especially along the right banks of the Sava and Danube Rivers. It is focussed on the particular landslide Umka near Belgrade, which is a paradigm for numerous landslides in that area. Various field investigations and laboratory tests carried out in several campaigns, including 1979, 1991–1993 and 2005, underpinned the conception of a general model for this typological landslide. Additionally, a new landslide monitoring campaign started in 2010 provided supplementary data support for the model development. Landslide characteristics, sliding mechanism and material properties based on all these data are first summarised and discussed and then featured in a general model. It is assumed that the landslide is hosted in the weathered zone of grey marls and that the main sliding surface typically propagates along the contact between the fresh and weathered marls. Furthermore, the triggering is principally associated with lateral river erosion in the landslide toe, although heavy precipitation and snow melting have been witnessed to be important indirect triggers. Their correlation to the recorded displacements was difficult to determine due to complex hydrogeological relations and an isolated groundwater system, which is another common characteristic of this landslide type. Back analysis on the basis of the adopted model and the determined geotechnical parameters has been performed. The latter analysis is of particular interest because the Umka landslide is currently under consideration for a mitigation and stabilisation plan related to the construction of a new motorway route. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Abolmasov B.,University of Belgrade | Milenkovic S.,Geomonitoring Team | Marjanovic M.,University of Belgrade | uric U.,University of Belgrade | Jelisavac B.,The Highway Institute
Landslides | Year: 2015

This paper describes a characteristic landslide model for landslides typically hosted in Neogene formations in Serbia, especially along the right banks of the Sava and Danube Rivers. It is focussed on the particular landslide Umka near Belgrade, which is a paradigm for numerous landslides in that area. Various field investigations and laboratory tests carried out in several campaigns, including 1979, 1991–1993 and 2005, underpinned the conception of a general model for this typological landslide. Additionally, a new landslide monitoring campaign started in 2010 provided supplementary data support for the model development. Landslide characteristics, sliding mechanism and material properties based on all these data are first summarised and discussed and then featured in a general model. It is assumed that the landslide is hosted in the weathered zone of grey marls and that the main sliding surface typically propagates along the contact between the fresh and weathered marls. Furthermore, the triggering is principally associated with lateral river erosion in the landslide toe, although heavy precipitation and snow melting have been witnessed to be important indirect triggers. Their correlation to the recorded displacements was difficult to determine due to complex hydrogeological relations and an isolated groundwater system, which is another common characteristic of this landslide type. Back analysis on the basis of the adopted model and the determined geotechnical parameters has been performed. The latter analysis is of particular interest because the Umka landslide is currently under consideration for a mitigation and stabilisation plan related to the construction of a new motorway route. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Zugic Z.,The Highway Institute | Sesov V.,Ss. Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje | Garevski M.,Ss. Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje | Vukicevic M.,University of Belgrade | Jockovic S.,University of Belgrade
Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering | Year: 2015

A simplified method for generating slope deformation hazard curve that takes into account the variations of input parameters is presented in this paper. The main assumption in the new approach is that the occurrence of peak slope deformation is Poisson[U+05F3]s process. The procedure is based on logic tree analysis, commercial software and routines programmed by the authors for generating sets of input files, and forming slope performance curve. The methodology was applied to a real landslide in order to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of the proposed approach. The results of the analysis showed the influence of the certain input factors on sliding displacement as well as the advantages of employing continuum mechanics approach. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Vasic M.,University of Novi Sad | Djogo M.,University of Novi Sad | Jelisavac B.,The Highway Institute
Tehnicki Vjesnik | Year: 2015

The landslide in the zone of the Sloboda Bridge in Novi Sad is one of the most extensively researched landslides in Serbia because it is large and it poses a threat to the stability of the aforementioned bridge over the Danube. At the time of its completion in 1981, this cantilever-spar cable-stayed bridge was the largest in the world, with a central span of 351 m. In the body of the landslide, the bridge is founded on reinforced concrete piles 27 m in length. The measured depth of movement for the first part of the sliding mass is 26 m, while that of the second one is 35 m. The designed drainage structures consist of the following: two wells with diameters of 6,5 m and depths of 22 m, eight drains with lengths of 45 m and a drainage tunnel linking the pressure chamber and the wells. © 2015, Strojarski Facultet. All rights reserved.


Djokic O.,The Highway Institute | Milicevic V.,The Highway Institute
Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment | Year: 2013

The rocks used in road construction in a country depend to a large extent on the geological history of that country. Serbia, as a part of the Balkan Peninsula, has a wide variety of rocks of different ages and technical characteristics, but traditionally only a small number of rock types are used in road construction. This Technical note presents the characteristics of these rock and rock aggregates following national (SRPS) standards. It highlights the need for new testing/codes which can be related to European Standards but also the need for a practical approach considering performance in situ as well as measured properties. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

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