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News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

In this report, Visiongain analyses the current state and future prospects of the leading gluten-free food submarkets, regional markets and national markets to provide a complete industry outlook. Learn About the Future Gluten-Free Food Industry Outlook The gluten-free food market forecasts will confirm and underpin your own analysis Keep Up To Speed With Gluten-Free Food Submarket Types • Bakery & Snacks Forecast 2017-2027 • Dairy & Dairy Alternatives Forecast 2017-2027 • Beverages Forecast 2017-2027 • Meat & Meat Alternatives Forecast 2017-2027 • Ready Meals Forecast 2017-2027 • Pasta Forecast 2017-2027 • Other Gluten Free Foods Forecast 2017-2027 Stay Informed About Gluten-Free Food - Read the latest gluten-free food industry news with fresh analysis of trends, technologies and leading companies Save Time Researching the competitive landscape with profiles of the15 leading gluten-free food companies including: • Dr. Schär SpA • FARMO SpA • Freedom Foods Group • General Mills • Genius Foods Ltd • Gruma S.A.B. de C.V. • Hain Celestial Group • Hero Group AG • Jamestown Mills • Kelkin Ltd • Kellogg's Company • PaneRiso Foods • PepsiCo, Inc. • Pinnacle Foods • The Kraft Heinz Company Reinforce Your Business Case For Gluten-Free Food - Substantiate your research proposal with our regional forecasts - Enhance Your Gluten-Free Food Presentations • Find 108 table & charts that you can utilise to illustrate your point in your gluten-free food investment proposal. Maintain An Advantage In Gluten-Free Food • Read the latest gluten-free foods & beverages forecasts, analysis and conclusions, which will sustain your competitive edge. Target readership • All stakeholders within the food industry • Food manufacturers • Food processors • Retailers • Wholesalers • Health food stores • Ingredient suppliers • Food marketing executives • NPD specialists • Food technologists • Food industry buyers • Food industry regulators • Food standards agencies • Senior executives • Consultancies • Banks • Government agencies To request a report overview of this report please email Sara Peerun at sara.peerun@visiongain.com or call Tel: +44-(0)-20-7336-6100 ASDA Boulder Brands UK Bupa Canadian Natural & Specialty Brands (CNSB) Cargill Caribou Coffee Coca-Cola Coles Didion Milling Dr. Schär SpA Dunkin' Donuts Facebook FARMO SpA Food Lion Freedom Foods Group Limited General Mills Genius Foods GIG? Gluten-free Restaurant GlutenFreeDelivers.com glutenfreemall.com glutenfreepalace.com Gruma S.A.B. de C.V. Hain Celestial Group Haus Rabenhorst Hero Group AG Hippeas Jamestown Mills Kelkin Ltd Kellogg's Company Kingsmill Laurens Spethmann Holding Love With Food Mamee Australia Mario Batali restaurant Marks and Spencers Molinos Río de la Plata SA Nabisco PaneRiso Foods Penford Food Pepsi PepsiCo. Inc. Pick and Pay Pinnacle Foods, Inc Pizza Hut Publix Schär shop.123glutenfree.com ShopRite Spinney's Sprouts Starbucks Target Tesco The George Institute The Kraft Heinz Company theglutenfreeshoppe.com udisglutenfree.com Valeo Foods Waitrose Warburtons Whole Foods Woolworths Brands Mentioned in This Report A&W Amoy Amy's Kitchen Aproten Arrowhead Mills Avalon Organics Barilla Barq's Bearitos Beiker Bénédicta. Betty Crocker's BiAglut Brinta Cascadian Farm Cats Prefer Chef Celestial Seasonings Cheerios Cool Foods CytoSport Daddies De Boles, Dreams De Ruijter Deliciously Gluten Free Dole DS - gluten free Duncan Hines Food in a Minute Foodservice Gallo Snacks Gardein Garden of Eatin' Gatorade Gezonddrinken Glutafin Glutino Golden Circle Good Taste Company Great Life by Lucinda Greenseas Guerrero Haagen-Dazs Heinz ABC Heinz at Home Heinz Baby Heinz Baby Food Heinz Beanz Heinz for Baby Heinz Infant Nutrition Heinz Ketchup Heinz Salad Cream Heinz Soup Heinz Western Sauces Heinz-Footstar Heinz-Meiweiyuan Hilary's Honig HP Sauce Imagine Jason Juvela Karvan Cévitam Kraft Heinz Canada Lea & Perrins Kitchen Livwell MaraNatha Maseca Minute Maid Mission Mug Natures Choice Nurture Baby Nutri+Plus Odwala Omission Ore-Ida Original Juice Co. Pasta Lensi Pillsbury Plasmon Praeger's Pudliszki PurePet Quero Roosvicee Rudi's Organic Bakery Schär Semper-Semper Sensible portions Simply Balanced Simply Organic Smart Ones Terra Tortiricas Tosty Trader Joe's Tropicana Udi's Venz Walnut Acres Organics Wattie's Wattie's For Baby Weight Watchers Werken bij Heinz Westbrae Naturals Westsoy Organisations Mentioned in This Report Association of European Celiac Societies Canadian Celiac Association Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Celiac Australia Celiac Sprue Association (CSA) Celiac UK Codex Alimentarius Commission European Commission European Food Information Council (EUFIC) Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) German Celiac Society (Deutsche Zöliakiegesellschaft - DZG) Gluten Free Certification Organization (GFCO) Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) Gluten-Free China Health Canada Irish Celiac Association Italian Celiac Association National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) NSF International Quality Assurance International (QAI) U.S. Department of Agriculture University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) To see a report overview please email Sara Peerun on sara.peerun@visiongain.com


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

In this report, Visiongain analyses the current state and future prospects of the leading gluten-free food submarkets, regional markets and national markets to provide a complete industry outlook. Learn About the Future Gluten-Free Food Industry Outlook The gluten-free food market forecasts will confirm and underpin your own analysis Keep Up To Speed With Gluten-Free Food Submarket Types • Bakery & Snacks Forecast 2017-2027 • Dairy & Dairy Alternatives Forecast 2017-2027 • Beverages Forecast 2017-2027 • Meat & Meat Alternatives Forecast 2017-2027 • Ready Meals Forecast 2017-2027 • Pasta Forecast 2017-2027 • Other Gluten Free Foods Forecast 2017-2027 Stay Informed About Gluten-Free Food - Read the latest gluten-free food industry news with fresh analysis of trends, technologies and leading companies Save Time Researching the competitive landscape with profiles of the15 leading gluten-free food companies including: • Dr. Schär SpA • FARMO SpA • Freedom Foods Group • General Mills • Genius Foods Ltd • Gruma S.A.B. de C.V. • Hain Celestial Group • Hero Group AG • Jamestown Mills • Kelkin Ltd • Kellogg's Company • PaneRiso Foods • PepsiCo, Inc. • Pinnacle Foods • The Kraft Heinz Company Reinforce Your Business Case For Gluten-Free Food - Substantiate your research proposal with our regional forecasts - Enhance Your Gluten-Free Food Presentations • Find 108 table & charts that you can utilise to illustrate your point in your gluten-free food investment proposal. Maintain An Advantage In Gluten-Free Food • Read the latest gluten-free foods & beverages forecasts, analysis and conclusions, which will sustain your competitive edge. Target readership • All stakeholders within the food industry • Food manufacturers • Food processors • Retailers • Wholesalers • Health food stores • Ingredient suppliers • Food marketing executives • NPD specialists • Food technologists • Food industry buyers • Food industry regulators • Food standards agencies • Senior executives • Consultancies • Banks • Government agencies To request a report overview of this report please email Sara Peerun at sara.peerun@visiongain.com or call Tel: +44-(0)-20-7336-6100 ASDA Boulder Brands UK Bupa Canadian Natural & Specialty Brands (CNSB) Cargill Caribou Coffee Coca-Cola Coles Didion Milling Dr. Schär SpA Dunkin' Donuts Facebook FARMO SpA Food Lion Freedom Foods Group Limited General Mills Genius Foods GIG? Gluten-free Restaurant GlutenFreeDelivers.com glutenfreemall.com glutenfreepalace.com Gruma S.A.B. de C.V. Hain Celestial Group Haus Rabenhorst Hero Group AG Hippeas Jamestown Mills Kelkin Ltd Kellogg's Company Kingsmill Laurens Spethmann Holding Love With Food Mamee Australia Mario Batali restaurant Marks and Spencers Molinos Río de la Plata SA Nabisco PaneRiso Foods Penford Food Pepsi PepsiCo. Inc. Pick and Pay Pinnacle Foods, Inc Pizza Hut Publix Schär shop.123glutenfree.com ShopRite Spinney's Sprouts Starbucks Target Tesco The George Institute The Kraft Heinz Company theglutenfreeshoppe.com udisglutenfree.com Valeo Foods Waitrose Warburtons Whole Foods Woolworths Brands Mentioned in This Report A&W Amoy Amy's Kitchen Aproten Arrowhead Mills Avalon Organics Barilla Barq's Bearitos Beiker Bénédicta. Betty Crocker's BiAglut Brinta Cascadian Farm Cats Prefer Chef Celestial Seasonings Cheerios Cool Foods CytoSport Daddies De Boles, Dreams De Ruijter Deliciously Gluten Free Dole DS - gluten free Duncan Hines Food in a Minute Foodservice Gallo Snacks Gardein Garden of Eatin' Gatorade Gezonddrinken Glutafin Glutino Golden Circle Good Taste Company Great Life by Lucinda Greenseas Guerrero Haagen-Dazs Heinz ABC Heinz at Home Heinz Baby Heinz Baby Food Heinz Beanz Heinz for Baby Heinz Infant Nutrition Heinz Ketchup Heinz Salad Cream Heinz Soup Heinz Western Sauces Heinz-Footstar Heinz-Meiweiyuan Hilary's Honig HP Sauce Imagine Jason Juvela Karvan Cévitam Kraft Heinz Canada Lea & Perrins Kitchen Livwell MaraNatha Maseca Minute Maid Mission Mug Natures Choice Nurture Baby Nutri+Plus Odwala Omission Ore-Ida Original Juice Co. Pasta Lensi Pillsbury Plasmon Praeger's Pudliszki PurePet Quero Roosvicee Rudi's Organic Bakery Schär Semper-Semper Sensible portions Simply Balanced Simply Organic Smart Ones Terra Tortiricas Tosty Trader Joe's Tropicana Udi's Venz Walnut Acres Organics Wattie's Wattie's For Baby Weight Watchers Werken bij Heinz Westbrae Naturals Westsoy Organisations Mentioned in This Report Association of European Celiac Societies Canadian Celiac Association Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Celiac Australia Celiac Sprue Association (CSA) Celiac UK Codex Alimentarius Commission European Commission European Food Information Council (EUFIC) Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) German Celiac Society (Deutsche Zöliakiegesellschaft - DZG) Gluten Free Certification Organization (GFCO) Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) Gluten-Free China Health Canada Irish Celiac Association Italian Celiac Association National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) NSF International Quality Assurance International (QAI) U.S. Department of Agriculture University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) To see a report overview please email Sara Peerun on sara.peerun@visiongain.com


Hodgson C.,Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Center | Bellomo R.,Austin Health | Berney S.,Austin Health | Bailey M.,Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Center | And 9 more authors.
Critical Care | Year: 2015

Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate current mobilization practice, strength at ICU discharge and functional recovery at 6 months among mechanically ventilated ICU patients. Method: This was a prospective, multi-centre, cohort study conducted in twelve ICUs in Australia and New Zealand. Patients were previously functionally independent and expected to be ventilated for >48 hours. We measured mobilization during invasive ventilation, sedation depth using the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (RASS), co-interventions, duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) at ICU discharge, mortality at day 90, and 6-month functional recovery including return to work. Results: We studied 192 patients (mean age 58.1±15.8 years; mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) (IQR) II score, 18.0 (14 to 24)). Mortality at day 90 was 26.6% (51/192). Over 1,351 study days, we collected information during 1,288 planned early mobilization episodes in patients on mechanical ventilation for the first 14 days or until extubation (whichever occurred first). We recorded the highest level of early mobilization. Despite the presence of dedicated physical therapy staff, no mobilization occurred in 1,079 (84%) of these episodes. Where mobilization occurred, the maximum levels of mobilization were exercises in bed (N=94, 7%), standing at the bed side (N=11, 0.9%) or walking (N=26, 2%). On day three, all patients who were mobilized were mechanically ventilated via an endotracheal tube (N=10), whereas by day five 50% of the patients mobilized were mechanically ventilated via a tracheostomy tube (N=18). Conclusions: Early mobilization of patients receiving mechanical ventilation was uncommon. More than 50% of patients discharged from the ICU had developed ICU-acquired weakness, which was associated with death between ICU discharge and day-90. © The TEAM Study Investigators.


TORONTO, ON--(Marketwired - November 15, 2016) - In an informative session on Monday, November 28, 2016 at 12pm EST, George Clinical Scientific Leader, Professor Craig Anderson, Executive Director at The George Institute, China and Senior Director of the Neurological and Mental Health Division, will discuss the recent success of the SAVE trial, which recruited over 2700 patients globally, with over 63% of those participants coming from China. Professor Anderson will outline many of the opportunities that exist when conducting clinical trials in Asia, such as the SAVE trial, and debunk many of the misconceptions that exist for sponsors who have operated in the traditional clinical trial markets of the USA and Europe. The delivery of a clinical trial to the highest scientific standards can be challenging in today's complex, high-cost, high-risk clinical trials environment. The Scientific Leadership Model, championed by George Clinical may be the answer. Following the recent publication of the results of one of the largest obstructive sleep apnea medical device trials (SAVE) ever undertaken, Professor Craig Anderson, will discuss the emergence of scientific leadership as an innovative service addition to a clinical trials design and delivery. Professor Craig Anderson has conducted some of the largest global neurology and blood pressure trials ever undertaken. He is widely considered a world authority on stroke and much of his success has revolved around conducting clinical trials in Asia. For more information or to register for this complimentary event, visit: The Scientific Leadership Model: An Innovative Approach to Clinical Trial Leadership, Design and Delivery Xtalks, powered by Honeycomb Worldwide Inc., is a leading provider of educational webinars to the global Life Sciences community. Every year thousands of industry practitioners (from pharmaceutical & biotech companies, private & academic research institutions, healthcare centers, etc.) turn to Xtalks for access to quality content. Xtalks helps Life Science professionals stay current with industry developments, trends and regulations. Xtalks webinars also provide perspectives on key issues from top industry thought leaders and service providers. To learn more about Xtalks visit http://xtalks.com


Farag I.,The George Institute | Howard K.,University of Sydney | Ferreira M.L.,University of Sydney | Sherrington C.,The George Institute for Global Health
Age and Ageing | Year: 2015

Background: despite evidence on what works in falls prevention, falls in older people remain an important public health problem.Aims: the purpose of this study was to model the impact and cost-effectiveness of a public health falls prevention programme, from the perspective of the health funder.Methods: a decision analytic Markov model compared the health benefits in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs of treatment and residential aged care with and without a population heath falls prevention programme. Different intervention costs, uptake levels and programme effectiveness were modelled in sensitivity analyses. Uncertainty was explored using univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analysis.Results: widespread rollout of a public health fall prevention programme could result in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $A28,931 per QALY gained, assuming a programme cost of $700 per person and at a fall prevention risk ratio of 0.75. This ICER would be considered cost-effective at a threshold value of $A50,000 per QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses for programme cost and effectiveness indicated that the public health programme produced greater health outcomes and was less costly than no programme when programme costs were $A500 or lower and risk ratio for falls was 0.70 or lower. At a cost of $A2,500, the public health falls prevention programme ceases to be a cost-effective option.Conclusion: serious consideration should be given to implementation of a public health programme of falls prevention as a cost-effective option that enables population-wide access to the intervention strategies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved.


Heritier S.,The George Institute | Heritier S.,University of Sydney | Lo S.N.,The George Institute | Morgan C.C.,Cardinal Systems
Statistics in Medicine | Year: 2011

This article has been motivated by an ongoing international adaptive confirmatory trial. At the interim analysis of this two-stage trial, none, one or two active treatment regimens are selected for further study in the second stage. A combination test approach is used in this practical setting with an extension of the theory to unbalanced randomization. We show that a combination test with suitable weights can still preserve the overall Type I error rate provided that the test statistic is chosen appropriately and the unpooled Z-test for proportions is not used. The accuracy of stagewise p-values is also discussed in a more general framework. Monte Carlo simulations confirm the validity of the approach retained and evaluate the necessary sample size. Additional issues addressed during the design of the trial are also examined such as multiplicity due to testing hypotheses on key secondary endpoints, a non-inferiority comparison to an active treatment and covariate adjusted analyses for various types of outcome. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Eyles H.,University of Auckland | Rodgers A.,The George Institute | Ni Mhurchu C.,University of Auckland
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics | Year: 2010

Background: Nutrition education may be most effective when personally tailored. Individualised electronic supermarket sales data offer opportunities to tailor nutrition education using shopper's usual food purchases. The present study aimed to use individualised electronic supermarket sales data to tailor nutrition resources for an ethnically diverse population in a large supermarket intervention trial in New Zealand. Methods: Culturally appropriate nutrition education resources (i.e. messages and shopping lists) were developed with the target population (through two sets of focus groups) and ethnic researchers. A nutrient database of supermarket products was developed using retrospective sales data and linked to participant sales to allow tailoring by usual food purchases. Modified Heart Foundation Tick criteria were used to identify 'healthier' products in the database suitable for promotion in the resources. Rules were developed to create a monthly report listing the tailored and culturally targeted messages to be sent to each participant, and to produce automatstailored shopping lists. Results: Culturally targeted nutrition messages (n = 864) and shopping lists (n = 3 formats) were developed. The food and nutrient database (n = 3000 top-selling products) was created using 12 months of retrospective sales data, and comprised 60%'healthier' products. Three months of baseline sales data were used to determine usual food purchases. Tailored resources were successfully mailed to 123 Māori, 52 Pacific and 346 non-Māori non-Pacific participants over the 6-month trial intervention period. Conclusions: Electronic supermarket sales data can be used to tailor nutrition education resources for a large number of ethnically diverse supermarket shoppers. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.


Peters S.A.E.,The George Institute | Peters S.A.E.,Julius Center for Health science and Primary Care | Woodward M.,The George Institute | Woodward M.,University of Glasgow | And 5 more authors.
British Journal of Haematology | Year: 2013

There is strong evidence from meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies that increasing plasma fibrinogen levels are associated with an increasing risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality. However, there are few published direct comparisons of the several different available fibrinogen assays in association with CVD or mortality. We therefore prospectively compared the standardized von Clauss assay of clottable fibrinogen with three other assays: prothrombin time (PT)-derived clottable fibrinogen, immunonephelometric fibrinogen, and heat precipitable fibrinogen in the Scottish Heart Health Extended Cohort. Hazard ratios (HRs) for a standard deviation increase in fibrinogen for risk of CVD, adjusted for age and sex, were 1·17 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1·14; 1·21) for the von Clauss assay; 1·19 (1·06; 1·33) for the heat precipitation assay; 1·16 (1·01; 1·35) for the PT-derived assay; and 1·28 (1·10; 1·51) for the immunonephelometric assay. HRs for all-cause mortality were 1·21 (1·18; 1·24); 1·13 (1·01; 1·26), 1·17 (1·00; 1·37) and 1·17 (0·99; 1·39), respectively. No significant differences were observed between the assays in such comparisons. We therefore conclude that the choice between plasma fibrinogen assays in routine clinical haematology and biochemistry laboratories should depend on practical factors, and not on expected differences in the strength of associations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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