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Wu X.,Soochow University of China | Wu X.,The First Peoples Hospital of Kunshan City | Wang Y.,The 148 Hospital of PLA | Wang H.,University of Chicago | And 5 more authors.
Current Therapeutic Research - Clinical and Experimental | Year: 2012

Background: Quinacrine (QC), an antimalarial drug, has been shown to possess anticancer effect both in vitro (cancer cell lines) and in vivo (mouse models). In the cancer cells, QC can simultaneously suppress nuclear factor-κB and activate p53 signaling, which results in the induction of the apoptosis in these cells. However, the experimental results come from a few limited cancer cell lines, and the detailed mechanisms remain unknown. Objective: This study investigated the tumor-killing effects of QC on gastric cancer cells as well as underlying molecular pathways. Methods: SGC-7901 cells were treated with or without QC at different concentrations for 24 hours. The effect of QC on the inhibition of SGC-7901 cell proliferation was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. Apoptosis was detected by examining nuclear morphology and quantifying phosphatidylserine externalization. Alterations in cellular morphology were analyzed by laser scanning confocal microscopy for fluorescent analysis. Cell cycle analysis was performed by propidium iodide (PI) staining and flow cytometry. The enzyme activity changes of caspase-3 were detected by colorimetry expression method. Western blot analysis was used to detect the changes in the protein level of Bax, Bc1-2, p53, and cytochrome c in cytosol of SGC-7901 cells. Results: Our results showed that QC could significantly inhibit the growth of SGC-7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner, with the IC 50 mean (SD) value of 16.18 (0.64) μM, compared with nontreated controls. QC treatment (15 μM) could also induce apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells (26.30% [5.31%], compared with control group of 3.37% [0.81%]; P < 0.01), and the increasing phosphatidylserine level and the accumulation of chromatin nucleation in QC-treated cells provided further evidence. In addition, cell cycle analysis with PI staining showed that a significant S enriches, increasing from 12.00% (1.24%) (control) to 20.94% (2.40%) (QC treatment) (P < 0.01). Furthermore, increased activities of caspase-3 (increasing from 0.108 [0.019] to 0.628 [0.068]; P < 0.01) were observed in SGC-7901 cells treated with 15 μM QC. Western blot analysis showed that QC treatment significantly increased the levels of proapoptotic proteins, including cytochrome c, Bax, and p53, and decreased the levels of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, thus shifting the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in favor of apoptosis. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that QC can significantly inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells, which involves p53 upregulation and caspase-3 activation pathway. © 2012 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc..


PubMed | Tzu Chi University, Zhengzhou University, Rutgers University and The First Peoples Hospital of Kunshan City
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The journal of pain : official journal of the American Pain Society | Year: 2015

Chronic sleep disturbance-induced stress is known to increase basal pain sensitivity. However, most surgical patients frequently report short-term sleep disturbance/deprivation during the pre- and postoperation periods and have normal pain perception presurgery. Whether this short-term sleep disturbance affects postsurgical pain is elusive. Here, we report that pre- or postexposure to rapid eye movement sleep disturbance (REMSD) for 6hours daily for 3 consecutive days did not alter basal responses to mechanical, heat, and cold stimuli, but did delay recovery in incision-induced reductions in paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation and paw withdrawal latencies to heat and cold stimuli on the ipsilateral side of male or female rats. This short-term REMSD led to stress shown by an increase in swim immobility time, a decrease in sucrose consumption, and an increase in the level of corticosterone in serum. Blocking this stress via intrathecal RU38486 or bilateral adrenalectomy abolished REMSD-caused delay in recovery of incision-induced reductions in behavioral responses to mechanical, heat, and cold stimuli. Moreover, this short-term REMSD produced significant reductions in the levels of mu opioid receptor and kappa opioid receptor, but not Kv1.2, in the ipsilateral L4/5 spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia on day 9 after incision (but not after sham surgery).Our findings show that short-term sleep disturbance either pre- or postsurgery does not alter basal pain perception, but does exacerbate postsurgical pain hypersensitivity. The latter may be related to the reductions of mu and kappa opioid receptors in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia caused by REMSD plus incision. Prevention of short-term sleep disturbance may help recovery from postsurgical pain in patients.


PubMed | Nantong University, University of Chicago, the First Peoples Hospital of Kunshan City, Jiangsu University and 4 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of oncology | Year: 2016

Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is an oncogenic serine/threonine kinase, it plays important roles in tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. In this study, we investigated the expression of AURKA in lung adenocarcinoma tissues, the role of small interference RNA targeting AURKA on growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines invitro. The AURKA is highly expressed in lung adenocarcinoma tissues and human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to knock down AURKA expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines H1299 and A549. The results indicated that depletion of AURKA could inhibit cell growth, cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The potential mechanisms of AURKA inhibition induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis are associated with downregulated RAF-1, CCND2, CCND3, CDK4, PAK4, EGFR and upregulated WEE1 expression. Furthermore, AURKA knockdown cooperated with vincristine (VCR) to repress A549 cell proliferation. Therefore, AURKA plays important roles in the proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma cells, which suggests that AURKA could be a promising tool for lung adenocarcinoma therapy.


Zhong N.,The First Peoples Hospital of Kunshan City | Chen H.,University of Chicago | Zhao Q.,Shandong University | Wang H.,University of Chicago | And 6 more authors.
Current Therapeutic Research - Clinical and Experimental | Year: 2010

Background: Griseofulvin, an oral nontoxic antifungal drug, has been reported to possess anticancer effect in human cancer cells, while the mechanisms are not completely understood. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic effect of griseofulvin on K562 cells and to understand its underlying molecular pathways. Methods: K562 cells were treated with griseofulvin at different concentrations for 24 hours, and the inhibition effect of griseofulvin on K562 cell proliferation was assessed by tetrazolium salt colorimetric assay. Apoptosis was assessed by examining nuclear morphology and quantifying phosphatidylserine externalization, and alterations in cellular morphology were analyzed by laser scanning confocal microscopy for fluorescent analysis. Flow cytometry was used in the analysis of cell cycle, mitochondrial membrane potential, and caspase pathways. Results: Griseofulvin could inhibit the growth of K562 cells in a dose-dependent manner with a mean (SD) inhibitory concentration of 50% value of 15.38 (1.35) μg/mL compared with untreated controls. Apoptosis was induced in K562 cells (38.35% [2.73%]; P < 0.01) by griseofulvin with the observation of both an increase in phosphatidylserine level and accumulation of chromatin nucleation in griseofulvintreated cells. In addition, cell-cycle analysis using propidium iodide staining suggested a significant G2/M accumulation (increase from mean 17.64% [4.49%] to 48.29 [1.89%]; P < 0.01) as a result of griseofulvin treatment. Flow cytometry analysis found that griseofulvin treatment was associated with the depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane in K562 cells. Furthermore, increased activities of caspase-3 by 22.15-fold (P < 0.01) and caspase-9 by 16.73-fold (P < 0.01) were observed in K562 cells after griseofulvin treatment compared with the untreated control; a decrease of caspase-8 activity was also observed, but the change was not statistically significant. Conclusions: These findings suggest that griseofulvin inhibited growth of K562 cells and induced cell apoptosis through cell-cycle arrest and mitochondrial membrane potential decrease as well as caspase-3 and -9 activation. Further testing is needed to evaluate the potential of griseofulvin as a candidate in the chemotherapy of hematologic malignancies. © 2010 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc.

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