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Rumana N.,Shiga University of Medical Science | Rumana N.,Sleep Center | Kita Y.,Shiga University of Medical Science | Kita Y.,University of Fukui | And 14 more authors.
International Journal of Stroke | Year: 2014

Background: Few comprehensive stroke and acute myocardial infarction registries of long duration exist in Japan to illustrate trends in acute case-fatality of stroke and acute myocardial infarction with greater precision. We examined 17-year case-fatality rates of stroke and acute myocardial infarction using an entire community-monitoring registration system to investigate trends in these rates over time in a Japanese population. Methods: Data were obtained from the Takashima Stroke and AMI Registry covering a stable population of approximately 55000 residents of Takashima County in central Japan. We divided the total observation period of 17 years into four periods, 1989-1992, 1993-1996, 1997-2000, and 2001-2005. We calculated gender, age-specific and age-adjusted acute case-fatality rates (%) of stroke and acute myocardial infarction across these four periods. Results: During the study period of 1989-2005, there were 341 fatal cases within 28 days of onset among 2239 first-ever stroke events and 163 fatal cases among 433 first-ever acute myocardial infarction events. The age-adjusted acute case-fatality rate of stroke was 14·9% in men and 15·7% in women. The age-adjusted acute case-fatality rate of acute myocardial infarction was 34·3% in men and 43·3% in women. The age-adjusted acute case-fatality rates of stroke and acute myocardial infarction showed insignificant differences across the four time periods. The average annual change in the acute case-fatality rate of stroke (-0·2%; 95% CI: -2·4-2·1) and acute myocardial infarction (2·7%; 95% CI: -0·7-6·1) did not change significantly across the study years. Conclusions: The acute case-fatality rates of stroke and acute myocardial infarction have remained stable from 1989 to 2005 in a rural and semi-urban Japanese population. © 2014 World Stroke Organization. Source


Turin T.C.,Shiga University of Medical Science | Turin T.C.,University of Calgary | Kita Y.,Shiga University of Medical Science | Rumana N.,Shiga University of Medical Science | And 10 more authors.
Acta Neurologica Scandinavica | Year: 2012

Background- Circadian periodicity in the onset of stroke has been reported. However, it is unclear whether this variation affects the acute stroke case fatality. Time of the day variation in stroke case fatality was examined using population-based stroke registration data. Methods- Stroke event data were acquired from the Takashima Stroke Registry, which covers a stable population of ≈55,000 in Takashima County in central Japan. During the period of 1990-2003, there were 1080 (549 men and 531 women) cases with classifiable stroke onset time. Stroke incidence was categorized as occurring at night (midnight-6 a.m.), morning (6 a.m.-noon), afternoon (noon-6 p.m.), and evening (6 p.m.-midnight). The 28-day case fatality rates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated by gender, age, and stroke subtype across the time blocks. After adjusting for gender, age at onset, and stroke severity at onset, the hazard ratios for fatal strokes in evening, night, and morning were calculated, with afternoon serving as the reference. Results - For all strokes, the 28-day case fatality rate was 23.3% (95% CI:19.4-27.6) for morning onset, 16.9% (95% CI:13.1-21.6) for afternoon onset, 18.3% (95% CI:13.6-24.1) for evening onset, and 21.0% (95% CI:15.0-28.5) for the night onset stroke. The case fatality for strokes during the morning was higher than the case fatality for strokes during afternoon. This fatality risk excess for morning strokes persisted even after adjusting for age, gender, and stroke severity on onset in multivariate analysis. Conclusion- In the examination of circadian variation of stroke case fatality, 28-day case fatality rate tended to be higher for the morning strokes. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Source


Watanabe M.,Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute | Kokubo Y.,Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute | Higashiyama A.,Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute | Ono Y.,Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute | And 3 more authors.
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice | Year: 2010

The association of the new diagnosis criteria for diabetes adopting hemoglobin A1c, recently proposed by the international expert committee, with macro-vascular complications was tested in a 12-year population-based cohort. The present analysis suggested that this new criteria were applicable to macro-vascular complications in the Japanese. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source


Okamura T.,Keio University | Kokubo Y.,Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute | Watanabe M.,Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute | Higashiyama A.,Hyogo College of Medicine | And 4 more authors.
Atherosclerosis | Year: 2011

Objective: Recently, several major organizations have proposed a unified definition for the metabolic syndrome (MetS), which should be evaluated in multiethnic groups. The effect of Mets on the incidence of cardiovascular disease needs to be assessed after adjusting for serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), a major risk factor for atherosclerotic diseases. This is especially needed to be evaluated in Asian populations with low incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: We conducted a 13-year prospective study of 4939 Japanese living in an urban area. The MetS was defined using a unified classification that included cut-off points for waist circumference in Asians. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of MetS for CAD and stroke were calculated using a Cox proportional model adjusted for other potential confounding factors with LDLC. Results and conclusion: During the follow-up period, there were 155 cases of CAD and 204 of stroke including 118 cerebral infarctions. In participants under 65 years old, the multivariable HRs of MetS for CAD were 1.21 (95% C.I., 0.64-2.28) in men and 4.44 (95% C.I., 1.73-11.4) in women; the HRs for ischemic stroke were 3.24 (95% C.I., 1.55-6.77) in men and 3.99 (95% C.I., 1.34-11.8) in women. In participants aged 65 years old and over, MetS only showed a significant association with CAD in men (HR 1.89, 95% C.I., 1.11-3.21). Serum LDLC was associated with increased risk of CAD in men irrespective of age group; however, it was not associated with CAD in women. There was no association between serum LDLC and ischemic stroke in any group stratified by sex and the age of 65. These results indicate that the new uniform MetS definition is useful for detecting high risk individuals, especially for middle-aged population. However, continuous screening for hypercholesterolemia is necessary to prevent CAD, especially in men, even in Asian countries such as Japan. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source


Okamura T.,Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute | Kokubo Y.,Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute | Watanabe M.,Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute | Higashiyama A.,Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute | And 4 more authors.
Atherosclerosis | Year: 2010

Objective: The impact of elevated triglycerides (TG) and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDLC) on the incidence of stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) has not been well evaluated in Asian populations such as in Japan, which have a lower incidence of myocardial infarction, but a higher risk of stroke than Western populations. Methods: The authors conducted an 11.7-year prospective study ending in 2005 of 5098 Japanese aged 30-79 living in an urban population, initially free of stroke or MI. The relationship between serum lipids and the risk for stroke and MI was determined by dividing the participants into four groups stratified by the combination of serum levels of TG and non-HDLC. The cut-off value was 1.7 mmol/L for TG and 4.9 mmol/L for non-HDLC. Results and conclusion: The total person-years were 59,774 (27,461 for men and 32,313 for women). During the follow-up period, there were 113 cases of MI and 180 of stoke (with 116 cerebral infarctions). Compared with the low TG/low non-HDLC group, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for MI in the high TG/high non-HDLC group was 2.55 (1.53-4.24) after adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors. The hazard ratio for cerebral infarction in the high TG alone group was 1.63 (1.03-2.56); however, the risk of cerebral infarction was not significantly increased in the other groups. High serum levels of TG and non-HDLC are both important targets for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in Japan. © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

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