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Tu C.J.,Shaoxing County Central Hospital | Liu J.S.,Shaoxing County Central Hospital | Song D.-G.,Shaoxing County Central Hospital | Zhen G.,Shaoxing County Central Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Journal of International Medical Research | Year: 2011

This study was designed to evaluate whether the maximum thickness of subarachnoid blood is an independent prognostic marker of mortality after traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage. Multivariate analysis showed the maximum thickness of subarachnoid blood was an independent predictor of death versus survival 1 month after injury and was inversely associated with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that maximum thickness of subarachnoid blood > 6.7 mm immediately after non-surgical resuscitation predicted 1-month mortality with 83.9% sensitivity and 67.1% specificity; its predictive value was similar to that of the GCS score. Addition of maximum thickness of subarachnoid blood to the GCS score did not significantly improve predictive performance. Hence, the maximum thickness of subarachnoid blood is a new independent prognostic marker of mortality and might become an additional, valuable tool for risk stratification and decision making in the acute phase of traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage. © 2011 Field House Publishing LLP.


Dong X.-Q.,The First Hangzhou Municipal Peoples Hospital | Yang S.-B.,Shengzhou Peoples Hospital | Zhu F.-L.,Shengzhou Peoples Hospital | Lv Q.-W.,Shengzhou Peoples Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Critical Care | Year: 2010

Introduction: Recently, we reported that high levels of resistin are present in the peripheral blood of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and are associated with a poor outcome. However, not much is known regarding the change in plasma resistin and its relation with mortality after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Thus, we sought to investigate change in plasma resistin level after TBI and to evaluate its relation with disease outcome.Methods: Fifty healthy controls and 94 patients with acute severe TBI were included. Plasma samples were obtained on admission and at days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 after TBI. Its concentration was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: Twenty-six patients (27.7%) died from TBI within 1 month. After TBI, plasma resistin level in patients increased during the 6-hour period immediately after TBI, peaked within 24 hours, plateaued at day 2, decreased gradually thereafter and was substantially higher than that in healthy controls during the 7-day period. A forward stepwise logistic regression selected plasma resistin level (odds ratio, 1.107; 95% confidence interval, 1.014-1.208; P = 0.023) as an independent predictor for 1-month mortality of patients. A multivariate linear regression showed that plasma resistin level was negatively associated with Glasgow Coma Scale score (t = -6.567, P < 0.001). A receiver operating characteristic curve identified plasma resistin cutoff level (30.8 ng/mL) that predicted 1-month mortality with the optimal sensitivity (84.6%) and specificity (75.0%) values (area under curve, 0.854; 95% confidence interval, 0.766-0.918; P < 0.001).Conclusions: Increased plasma resistin level is found and associated with Glasgow Coma Scale score and mortality after TBI. © 2010 Dong et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Dong X.-Q.,The First Hangzhou Municipal Peoples Hospital | Hu Y.-Y.,Zhejiang University | Yu W.-H.,The First Hangzhou Municipal Peoples Hospital | Zhang Z.-Y.,The First Hangzhou Municipal Peoples Hospital
Journal of Critical Care | Year: 2010

Purpose: Resistin increases in peripheral blood of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We sought to evaluate its relation with disease outcome. Materials and Methods: Thirty healthy controls and 86 patients with acute ICH were included. Plasma samples were obtained on admission. Its concentration was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Thirty-two patients (37.2%) died from ICH in a week. The plasma resistin level (24.2 ± 9.7 ng/mL) in patients was significantly higher than that (8.8 ± 2.4 ng/mL) in healthy controls after adjustment by age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and body mass index using analysis of covariate (F = 9.507, P = .003).A univariate correlation analysis found Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and ICH volume, but a multivariate linear regression only selected GCS score (t = -4.587, P < .001) to be related to plasma resistin level. On a multivariate logistic regression, plasma resistin level (odds ratio = 1.257, 95% confidence interval = 1.058-1.492, P = .009) was an independent variable predicting 1-week mortality. A receiver operating characteristic curve identified that a plasma resistin level greater than 26.3 ng/mL predicted 1-week mortality of patients with 81.2% sensitivity and 81.5% specificity (P < .001). Areas under curves of GCS score and ICH volume were not statistically significantly larger than that of plasma resistin level (P > .05). Conclusions: Increased resistin level is found after ICH, in association with a poor clinical outcome. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Tu C.J.,Shaoxing County Central Hospital | Liu W.G.,Zhejiang University | Dong X.Q.,The First Hangzhou Municipal Peoples Hospital | Liu J.S.,Shaoxing County Central Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Journal of International Medical Research | Year: 2011

This study evaluated interleukin (IL)-11 as an independent prognostic marker of mortality following intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). Plasma IL-11 levels in patients with ICH were significantly higher than in healthy controls. Multivariate analysis indicated that plasma IL-11 level was an independent predictor for mortality within 1 week of ICH onset and was positively associated with haematoma volume. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified that a baseline plasma IL-11 level > 20.9 pg/ml predicted mortality within 1 week of ICH onset with 81.2% sensitivity and 74.1% specificity. The area under the curve for IL-11 level was significantly smaller than that for the Glasgow Coma Scale score, but similar to that for haematoma volume. IL-11 did not, however, significantly improve the predictive value of the Glasgow Coma Scale or haematoma volume. Thus, IL-11 may be considered as a new independent prognostic marker of mortality and an additional valuable tool for risk stratification and decision-making in the acute phase of ICH. © 2011 Field House Publishing LLP.

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