Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Tórshavn, Faroe Islands

Mohr M.,University of the Faroe Islands | Mohr M.,Gothenburg University | Helge E.W.,Copenhagen University | Petersen L.F.,University of the Faroe Islands | And 7 more authors.
European Journal of Applied Physiology | Year: 2015

Purpose: The present study examined the effects of 15 weeks of soccer training and two different swimming training protocols on bone turnover in sedentary middle-aged women. Methods: Eighty-three premenopausal mildly hypertensive women [age: 45 ± 6 (±SD) years, height: 165 ± 6 cm, weight: 80.0 ± 14.1 kg, body fat: 42.6 ± 5.7 %, systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure: 138 ± 6/85 ± 3 mmHg] were randomized into soccer training (SOC, n = 21), high-intensity intermittent swimming (HS, n = 21), moderate-intensity swimming (MS, n = 21) intervention groups, and a control group (C, n = 20). The training groups completed three sessions per week for 15 weeks. DXA scans were performed and resting blood samples were drawn pre- and post-intervention. Results: In SOC, plasma osteocalcin, procollagen type I N propeptide and C-terminal telopeptide increased (P < 0.05) by 37 ± 15, 52 ± 23 and 42 ± 18 %, respectively, with no changes in MS, HS and C. The intervention-induced increase in SOC was larger (P < 0.05) than in MS, HS and C. In SOC, leg BMC increased (P < 0.05) by 3.1 ± 4.5 %, with a larger increase in SOC than in C. Femoral shaft and trochanter bone mineral density (BMD) increased (P < 0.05) by 1.7 ± 1.9 and 2.4 ± 2.9 %, respectively, in SOC, with a greater (P < 0.05) change in SOC than in MS and C, whereas total body and total leg BMD did not change in any of the groups. Conclusion: In conclusion, 15 weeks of soccer training with sedentary middle-aged women caused marked increases in bone turnover markers, with concomitant increases in leg bone mass. No changes in bone formation and resorption markers were seen after prolonged submaximal or high-intensity intermittent swimming training. Thus, soccer training appears to provide a powerful osteogenic stimulus in middle-aged women. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Weihe P.,The Faroese Hospital System
International journal of circumpolar health | Year: 2012

For centuries the pilot whale has been an important part Faroese life--both in regard to food and culture. However, studies dating back to 1977 have shown an increase in contamination of the meat, blubber, liver and kidneys of pilot whales. Several birth cohorts have been established in the Faroes in order to discover the health effects related to mercury and organchlorine exposure. In short the results have so far shown that: mercury from pilot whale meat adversely affects the foetal development of the nervous system; the mercury effect is still detectable during adolescence; the mercury from the maternal diet affects the blood pressure of the children; the contaminants of the blubber adversely affect the immune system so that the children react more poorly to immunizations; contaminants in pilot whales appear to increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease in those who often eat pilot whale; the risk of hypertension and arteriosclerosis of the carotid arteries is increased in adults who have an increased exposure to mercury; septuagenarians with type 2 diabetes or impaired fasting glycaemia tended to have higher PCB concentrations and higher past intake of traditional foods, especially during childhood and adolescence. Also impaired insulin secretion appears to constitute an important part of the type 2 diabetes pathogenesis associated with exposure to persistent lipophilic food contaminants. From the latest research results, the authors consider that the conclusion from a human health perspective must be to recommend that pilot whale is no longer used for human consumption. Source


Weihe P.,The Faroese Hospital System | Joensen H.D.,Chief Medical Officer in the Faroe Islands
International Journal of Circumpolar Health | Year: 2012

For centuries the pilot whale has been an important part Faroese life - both in regard to food and culture. However, studies dating back to 1977 have shown an increase in contamination of the meat, blubber, liver and kidneys of pilot whales. Several birth cohorts have been established in the Faroes in order to discover the health effects related to mercury and organchlorine exposure. In short the results have so far shown that: mercury from pilot whale meat adversely affects the foetal development of the nervous system; the mercury effect is still detectable during adolescence; the mercury from the maternal diet affects the blood pressure of the children; the contaminants of the blubber adversely affect the immune system so that the children react more poorly to immunizations; contaminants in pilot whales appear to increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease in those who often eat pilot whale; the risk of hypertension and arteriosclerosis of the carotid arteries is increased in adults who have an increased exposure to mercury; septuagenarians with type 2 diabetes or impaired fasting glycaemia tended to have higher PCB concentrations and higher past intake of traditional foods, especially during childhood and adolescence. Also impaired insulin secretion appears to constitute an important part of the type 2 diabetes pathogenesis associated with exposure to persistent lipophilic food contaminants. From the latest research results, the authors consider that the conclusion from a human health perspective must be to recommend that pilot whale is no longer used for human consumption. © 2012 Pál Weihe and Høgni Debes Joensen. Source


Mohr M.,University of Exeter | Mohr M.,Gothenburg University | Mohr M.,Health Science University | Lindenskov A.,The Faroese Confederation of Sports and Olympic Committee | And 7 more authors.
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports | Year: 2014

The present study examined the effects of short-term recreational football training on blood pressure (BP), fat mass, and fitness in sedentary, 35-50-year-old premenopausal women with mild hypertension. Forty-one untrained, hypertensive women were randomized into a football training group (n=21; FTG) and a control group (n=20; CON). FTG performed 45±1 1-h small-sided football training sessions during the 15-week intervention period. BP, body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), blood lipid profile, and fitness level were determined pre- and post-intervention. After 15 weeks, systolic and diastolic BP, respectively, were lowered more (P<0.05) in FTG (-12±3 and -6±2mmHg) than in CON (-1±1 and 1±2mmHg). Total body fat mass decreased more (P<0.05) in FTG than in CON during the 15-week intervention period (-2.3±0.5kg vs 0.4±0.3kg). After 15 weeks, both total cholesterol (-0.4±0.1mmol/L vs 0.1±0.2mmol/L) and triglyceride (-0.2±0.1mmol/L vs 0.3±0.2mmol/L) were lowered more (P<0.05) in FTG than in CON. Yo-Yo intermittent endurance level 1 test performance increased more (P<0.05) in FTG than in CON (111±18% vs 1±3%) during the 15-week intervention period. In conclusion, short-term football training resulted in a marked reduction in BP and induced multiple improvements in fitness and cardiovascular health profile of untrained, premenopausal women with mild hypertension. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Source


Petersen M.S.,The Faroese Hospital System | Halling J.,The Faroese Hospital System | Weihe P.,The Faroese Hospital System | Jensen T.K.,University of Southern Denmark | And 5 more authors.
Environmental Research | Year: 2015

Background: Endocrine disrupting industrial chemicals, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are suspected to adversely affect male reproductive functions. Objectives: The Faroe Islands community exhibits an unusually wide range of exposures to dietary contaminants, and in this setting we examined the possible association between PCB exposure and semen quality and reproductive hormones in fertile Faroese men. Methods: Participants in this cross-sectional study include 266 proven fertile men residing in the Faroe Islands. PCB levels and hormone profiles were measured in serum samples taken at the clinical examination that included semen quality parameters. Results: A significant positive association was seen between serum-PCB and the testosterone/estradiol ratio (. p=0.04). In the unadjusted analyses, elevated PCB exposure was associated with increased serum concentrations of SHBG (. p=0.01) and FSH (. p=0.05). We found no association between the serum PCB concentration and the semen quality variables. Conclusion: In this population of highly exposed fertile men, the current serum-PCB concentration was associated with higher androgen/estrogen ratio. Further studies are needed to establish the findings and further document PCB-associated hormonal effects, any time windows of increased susceptibility, and the role of PCB in sub-fecundity. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Source

Discover hidden collaborations