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The Electrochemical Society is a learned society based in the United States that supports scientific inquiry in the field of electrochemistry and solid-state science and technology. ECS bridges the gaps among academia, research, and engineering – bringing together scientists from around the world for the exchange of technical information.The Society currently has more than 8,000 scientists and engineers in over 70 countries worldwide who hold individual membership, as well as roughly 100 corporations and laboratories that hold corporate membership. Wikipedia.


Matsui M.,The Electrochemical Society
IEEJ Transactions on Fundamentals and Materials | Year: 2015

To provide a method for manufacturing of a silicon mono-like crystal without using a seed crystal, a repellent film is tried to use as a mold releasing film. The molten silicon is solidified into a single direction. The orientation of the silicon crystal manufactured by using the repellent film are aligned almost in the same direction. It is found that the repellent mold releasing film is effective for manufacturing of the silicon mono-like crystal. © 2015 The Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan.


« UMTRI: average new vehicle fuel economy decreased in 2015 from 2014 | Main | Mobileye and Volkswagen form strategic partnership; real-time image processing for autonomous driving; swarm data » The Electrochemical Society (ECS), in partnership with the Toyota Research Institute of North American (TRINA), a division of Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. (TEMA), is requesting proposals from young professors and scholars pursuing innovative electrochemical research in green energy technology. The purpose of the annual ECS Toyota Young Investigator Fellowship, established in 2014, is to encourage young professors and scholars to pursue research in green energy technology that may promote the development of next-generation vehicles capable of utilizing alternative fuels. Global development of industry and technology in the 20th century, increased production of vehicles and the growing population have resulted in massive consumption of fossil fuels. Today, the automotive industry faces three challenges regarding environmental and energy issues: Although the demand for oil alternatives—such as natural gas, electricity and hydrogen—may grow, each alternative energy source has its disadvantages. Currently, oil remains the main source of automotive fuel; however, further research and development of alternative energies may bring change. Electrochemical research has already informed the development and improvement of innovative batteries, electrocatalysts, photovoltaics and fuel cells. Through this fellowship, ECS and TRINA hope to see more innovative and unconventional technologies borne from electrochemical research. The fellowship will be awarded to a minimum of one candidate annually. Winners will receive a restricted grant of no less than $50,000 to conduct the research outlined in their proposal within one year. Winners will also receive a one-year complimentary ECS membership as well as the opportunity to present and/or publish their research with ECS. To qualify, a candidate must be under 40 years of age and working in North America. The candidate must submit an original research proposal for review by the ECS Toyota Young Investigator Fellowship Committee. The proposed research theme must not overlap with other research grants or other funded research projects. Depending on the research progress and the results obtained at the completion of the award period, Toyota may elect to enter into a research agreement with the recipient to continue the work. The recipient must publish their findings in a relevant ECS journal and/or present at an ECS meeting within 24 months of the end of the research period. Prof. Patrick Cappillino, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Mushroom-derived Natural Products as Flow Battery Electrolytes: to investigate the use of a naturally occurring and biologically produced compound in non-aqueous redox-flow batteries (NRFB) to tune three important attributes while retaining extraordinary metal-binding properties: redox potential; solubility in NRFB solvents; peripheral electrostatic and steric properties. Prof. Yogesh (Yogi) Surendranath, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Methanol Electrosynthesis at Carbon-Supported Molecular Active Sites: to synthesize a selective electrocatalyst for methane to methanol conversion by ligating single site transition metal compounds known to activate methane with graphitic carbon surfaces that allow for facile charge transfer. Dr. David Go, University of Notre Dame. Plasma Electrochemistry: A New Approach to Green Electrochemistry: to demonstrate the feasibility of using plasma electrochemistry to process carbon dioxide (CO ) for the production of alternative fuels, thereby ushering in a novel electrochemically-driven approach to both capture and reutilize CO , reducing the overall carbon footprint of automobiles.


Abstract: ECS published its first Editors' Choice article on Tuesday, March 22, 2016 in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society. The article, entitled "Communication--Comparison of Nanoscale Focused Ion Beam and Electrochemical Lithiation in β-Sn Microspheres," details transformative findings in the dosage and spatial distribution of lithiation. Editors' Choice articles are a special designation of ECS's newly established Communication articles, which are designed to highlight breakthrough preliminary research and bolster the scientific discovery process. ECS journal editors designate exemplary Communication articles as Editors' Choice when the research presented is transformative, detailing either novel advancements in a field or completely new discoveries. "This paper introduces the use of a focused Li-ion beam (Li-FIB) as a new tool that is designed to probe lithiation mechanism at the nanoscale," says Nick Wu, Associate Editor of the Journal of The Electrochemical Society. "This technique, which employs a focused Li-ion beam with spot size of a few tens of nanometers and kinetic energy of a few keV, enables precise dosage and spatial distribution of lithiation." Papers chosen as Editors' Choice are regarded as having the highest quality, impact, significance, and scientific or technological interest to electrochemical and solid state science and technology. In order to disseminate these findings to the scientific community at large and open the door to faster developments of practical applications, all Editors' Choice articles are published Open Access. "Furthermore," Wu says, "lithiation in this technique is carried out in the absence of electrolytes so that it allows the study of lithiation dynamics solely in the bulk or surface layers (coatings) of the electrode material without the confounding influences from the electrolyte interactions." Each paper undergoes the same rigorous peer-review process associated with ECS journals, with Editors' Choice articles showing extraordinary direction, concept, interpretation, field, or way of doing something. About The Electrochemical Society Leading the world in electrochemistry and solid state science and technology for more than 110 years, The Electrochemical Society (ECS) was founded in 1902 as an international nonprofit, educational organization. ECS now has more than 9,000 individual and institutional members in more than 75 countries. Home of the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, the oldest peer-reviewed journal in its field, the ECS Digital Library provides searchable online access to the collection of ECS technical journals and other publications. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


Reference electrodes (REs) are used to measure the voltages of individual electrodes that make up the battery cell. "Such information is critical, especially when developing batteries for larger-scale applications, such as electric vehicles, that have far greater energy density and longevity requirements than typical batteries in cell phones and laptop computers," said Argonne battery researcher Daniel Abraham, co-author of a newly published study in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society. "This kind of detailed information provides insight into a battery cell's health; it's the type of information that researchers need to evaluate battery materials at all stages of their development." Argonne battery researchers have been at the forefront of using REs to evaluate the performance of lithium-ion cells, Abraham said. Their studies have provided crucial insights into cell aging phenomena, including the effects of test temperatures and cycling voltages. Mitigating the root causes of aging can increase cell longevity and improve the commercial viability for applications that require long-term battery durability. Until recently, Argonne battery researchers would use only one RE, based on a lithium-tin (Li-Sn) alloy, to collect information. However, Abraham's team found that by sandwiching a Li-Sn RE between the positive and negative electrodes, while simultaneously positioning a pure Li metal RE next to the stack, they could obtain insights into electrode state-of-charge shifts, active material use, active material loss and impedance changes. In testing the new RE configuration, researchers used a cell containing a lithiated oxide cathode (NCM-523), an Argonne-developed silicon-graphite anode (Si-Gr) and various electrolytes, including ones with fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) or vinylene carbonate (VC) additives. Both NCM-523 and Si-Gr are materials of interest for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries being developed to extend the driving range of vehicles. "Silicon-containing electrodes could double the energy stored in lithium-ion cells," said Abraham. But because Si-containing cells degrade more quickly, the Argonne team wanted to know the impact of the FEC and VC addition to the cell electrolyte. "Our new RE configuration confirms the beneficial impact of these additives, not only in reducing capacity loss but also in mitigating the impedance rise displayed by cells without these additives," he added. More information: Matilda Klett et al. Electrode Behavior RE-Visited: Monitoring Potential Windows, Capacity Loss, and Impedance Changes in Li (Ni Co Mn ) O /Silicon-Graphite Full Cells , Journal of The Electrochemical Society (2016). DOI: 10.1149/2.0271606jes


Williams M.,The Electrochemical Society | Reifsnider K.,University of South Carolina
International Journal of Hydrogen Energy | Year: 2011

The present paper provides a thermodynamic foundation and interpretation of the concept of exergetic efficiency. The interpretation focuses on solid oxide fuel cell behavior, specifically the impedance of SOFCs as an indicator of exergetic efficiency. Subsequently, that concept is extended to the consideration of changes in response during long-term operation, resulting in a discussion of the possible use of exergetic efficiency with the interpretation in terms of impedance as a method of prognosis of expected performance based on observed impedance changes. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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