Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Pan Z.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army | Chen J.,Sanatorium for 71521 Army Retired Cadres | Qu L.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army | Cui Y.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine | Year: 2015

Objective: To obtain anatomical data on intertubercular sulcus of humerus, evaluate the correlation between intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head, to guide the positioning of torsion angle of prosthesis during total shoulder arthroplasty and provide references for shoulder prosthesis design. Methods: Using a Siemens Ultrahigh speed 64- rows multi-slices spiral CT scanner and 20 dried adult humeral specimens (intact specimen, no fractures or pathological damage), of these, left lateral in 10 cases, right lateral in 10 cases, male or female all inclusive, specimens are all provided by Anatomy Department of Weifang Medical College, scan ranged from the highest point of humeral head to the distal ends of trochlea. And scanned data were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: There is a linear correlation between the distance from intertubercular sulcus to central axis line of humeral head, position angle of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head at the beginning slice of intertubercular sulcus. There is a linear correlation between position angle of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head at the slice of surgical neck. Conclusion: There is a linear correlation between position of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head, in total shoulder arthroplasty, using intertubercular sulcus as anatomical landmark will help to accurately position torsion angle of individualized prosthesis. Position angle of intertubercular sulcus is an objective, flexible positioning indicator. © 2015, E-Century Publishing Corporation. All rights reserved. Source


Pan Z.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army | Zhang H.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army | Sun C.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army | Qu L.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army | Cui Y.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery | Year: 2015

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of arthroscopy-assisted reconstruction of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligament using Endobutton for treating acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. Methods: From March 2012 to May 2013, a total of 22 patients with fresh AC joint dislocation (Rockwood type III and type V) were treated with arthroscopy-assisted Endobutton reconstruction of the CC ligament. The regular post-operation follow-up was performed. Shoulder joint function was assessed with Constant–Murley scores. Postoperative efficacy of the surgery was evaluated using the Karlsson criterion. Results: The 22 patients were followed postoperatively for an average of 24 months (16–31 months). Among them, 20 patients achieved good functional recovery with no pain. Two patients had slight pain in the acromion during shoulder joint motion with limited abduction at 3 months, both of whom had recovered at 6 months. Radiography confirmed anatomical reduction of the AC joint in all patients. At 1 year, the Constant–Murley scores were 93.1 ± 2.4 points on the injured side versus 94.2 ± 2.7 points on the uninjured side. The difference did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05). Postoperative Karlsson evaluation ranked 20 patients (90.9 %) as grade A and 2 as grade B (9.1 %) at the 3-month follow-up. All patients had become grade A at 6 months. None of the patients had brachial plexus or peripheral vascular injuries. Conclusion: Arthroscopy-assisted reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament by Endobutton fixation is a safe, easy method for treating AC joint dislocation. It provides reliable fixation, causes little trauma, and has a fast recovery. © 2014, The Author(s). Source


Pan Z.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army | Qu L.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army | Cui Y.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army | Guan Q.,The Eighty Ninth Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine | Year: 2016

Introduction: This research was to study the anatomical features of the retroversion angle of humeral heads (RA) and the bicipital groove among Asian population using CT and to make correlation between RA and two parameters of bicipital groove. The two parameters of bicipital groove were the distance between bicipital groove and the central axis of humeral head (Distance D), and bicipital groove orientation. Methods: Twenty dry adult humeral specimens from an anatomy department of a medical college underwent spiral CT scan. RA and the two anthropometric parameters of the bicipital groove on transverse plane including the initial part of the bicipital groove (IP slice), the plane where the humeral head had the largest diameter (LD slice), and the surgical neck (SN slice) were measured. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the features of the parameters and the correlation coefficient between these parameters. Results: The average RA was 32.10 ± 14.10 (range: 0.43-54.69) without statistical difference between the left and the right side. Both the correlation coefficient between Distance D and RA and the correlation coefficient between bicipital groove orientation and RA were significantly negative on IP slices and insignificantly negative on LD slices. On SN slices, the correlation coefficient between Distance D and RA was negative without statistical difference (P=0.06); the correlation coefficient between bicipital groove orientation and RA was significantly negative (P=0.027). Conclusions: There was a negative correlation between Distance D and RA, and between bicipital groove orientation and RA. These anatomical data are probably helpful for orthopedic surgery. © 2016, E-Century Publishing Corporation. All rights reserved. Source

Discover hidden collaborations