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Palo Alto, CA, United States

Lansdorp-Vogelaar I.,Erasmus Medical Center | Karsa L.V.,The Detection Group
Endoscopy | Year: 2012

Multidisciplinary, evidence-based guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening and diagnosis have been developed by experts in a project coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The full guideline document covers the entire process of population-based screening. It consists of 10 chapters and over 250 recommendations, graded according to the strength of the recommendation and the supporting evidence. The 450-page guidelines and the extensive evidence base have been published by the European Commission. The first chapter deals with the evidence for the effectiveness of CRC screening; key operational parameters such as age-range, interval between two negative screening examinations, and some combinations of tests; and cost-effectiveness. The content of the chapter is presented here to promote international discussion and collaboration by making the principles and standards recommended in the new EU Guidelines known to a wider professional and scientific community. Following these recommendations has the potential to enhance the control of colorectal cancer through improvement in the quality and effectiveness of the screening process, including multi-disciplinary diagnosis and management of the disease. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York. Source


Karsa L.V.,The Detection Group | Patnick J.,University of Oxford | Segnan N.,University of Turin
Endoscopy | Year: 2012

Multidisciplinary, evidence-based guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening and diagnosis have been developed by experts in a project coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The full guideline document covers the entire process of population-based screening. It consists of 10 chapters and over 250 recommendations, graded according to the strength of the recommendation and the supporting evidence. The 450-page guidelines and the extensive evidence base have been published by the European Commission. The content of the executive summary is presented here to promote international discussion and collaboration by making the principles and standards recommended in the new EU Guidelines known to a wider professional and scientific community. Following these recommendations has the potential to enhance the control of colorectal cancer through improvement in the quality and effectiveness of screening programmes and services. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York. Source


Steele R.J.C.,Ninewells Hospital | Rey J.-F.,Institute Arnault Tzanck | Lambert R.,The Detection Group
Endoscopy | Year: 2012

Multidisciplinary, evidence-based guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening and diagnosis have been developed by experts in a project coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The full guideline document covers the entire process of population-based screening. It consists of 10 chapters and over 250 recommendations, graded according to the strength of the recommendation and the supporting evidence. The 450-page guidelines and the extensive evidence base have been published by the European Commission. The chapter on professional requirements and training includes 23 graded recommendations. The content of the chapter is presented here to promote international discussion and collaboration by making the principles and standards recommended in the new EU Guidelines known to a wider professional and scientific community. Following these recommendations has the potential to enhance the control of colorectal cancer through improvement in the quality and effectiveness of surveillance and other elements in the screening process, including multi-disciplinary diagnosis and management of the disease. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York. Source


Park J.Y.,International Agency for Research on Cancer IARC | von Karsa L.,The Detection Group | Herrero R.,International Agency for Research on Cancer IARC
Clinical Endoscopy | Year: 2014

Despite the substantial burden of gastric cancer worldwide, population strategies for primary prevention have not been introduced in any country. Recognizing the causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection, there is increasing interest in population-based programs to eradicate the infection to prevent gastric cancer. Nonetheless, the paucity of available evidence on feasibility and efectiveness has prevented implementation of this approach. Tere are very few secondary prevention programs based on screening with endoscopy or radiography, notably in the Republic of Korea and Japan, two of the countries with the highest incidence rates of gastric cancer. In Korea, where the organized screening program is in place, survival rate of gastric cancer is as high as 67%. More research is needed to quantify the specifc contribution of the screening program to observed declines in mortality rates. Gastric cancer screening is unlikely to be feasible in many Low-Middle Income Countries where the gastric cancer burden is high. Prevention strategies are still under development and the optimal approach may difer depending on local conditions and societal values. Te present review gives an overview of the etiology and burden of the disease, and possible prevention strategies for countries and regions confronted with a signifcant burden of disease. © 2014 Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Source


Sankaranarayanan R.,The Detection Group | Nessa A.,Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University | Esmy P.O.,Christian Fellowship Community Health Center | Dangou J.-M.,World Health Organization
Best Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology | Year: 2012

The need for simple, cost-effective screening approaches for cervical cancer prevention in low-resource countries has led to the evaluation of visual screening with 3-5% acetic acid. The low reproducibility and wide variation in accuracy reflect the subjective nature of the test. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 80%, 92%, 10% and 99%, respectively, for detecting cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse lesions. Realistic sensitivity of a quality- assured single visual inspection with acetic acid is around 50%. A single round of visual inspection with acetic acid screening has been associated with a 25-35% reduction in cervical cancer incidence and the frequency of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse lesions in randomised-controlled trials. Despite all its limitations, implementing visual inspection with acetic acid screening in low-resource countries may provide a pragmatic approach to building up human resources and infrastructure that may facilitate the highly anticipated low-cost, rapid human papilloma virus testing in the near future. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

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