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Finley C.E.,The Cooper Institute
Journal of the American Dietetic Association | Year: 2010

Previous research examining the relationships among glycemic index, glycemic load, and the metabolic syndrome has resulted in inconsistent findings. The objective of this study was to examine whether glycemic index and glycemic load are associated with prevalent metabolic syndrome and its components after adjustment for cardiorespiratory fitness, an objective measure of physical activity habitus. Cross-sectional study. Women (n=1,775) and men (n=9,137) who completed a comprehensive medical examination between October 1987 and March 1999, including maximal treadmill exercise test and 3-day dietary records at the Cooper Clinic, Dallas, TX. Metabolic syndrome and its components, defined by the revised Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate sex-specific odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals to evaluate the associations among glycemic index, glycemic load, and prevalent metabolic syndrome and its components, while adjusting for potential confounding variables. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 24% in men and 9% in women. A positive association across quintiles of glycemic index and metabolic syndrome, elevated triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in men was observed in the fully adjusted model (P for trend<0.05). In women, glycemic index was positively associated with large waist girth, low HDL-C, and elevated triglycerides (P for trend<0.05 for all) after multivariate adjustment including cardiorespiratory fitness. Glycemic load was positively associated with elevated triglycerides and low HDL-C (P for trend<0.0001) and inversely associated with prevalence of large waist girth and elevated glucose (P for trend<0.0001) in men. Among women, glycemic load was positively associated with elevated triglycerides (P for trend=0.04) and low HDL-C (P for trend<0.0001) in the multivariate model including cardiorespiratory fitness. A lifestyle that includes a low glycemic diet can improve metabolic risk profiles in men and women. Prospective studies examining glycemic index, glycemic load, and metabolic syndrome that control for cardiorespiratory fitness are needed. Copyright © 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Source


Chapman S.B.,University of Texas at Dallas | Aslan S.,Advance MRI LLC | Spence J.S.,University of Texas at Dallas | DeFina L.F.,The Cooper Institute | And 3 more authors.
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience | Year: 2013

Physical exercise, particularly aerobic exercise, is documented as providing a low cost regimen to counter well-documented cognitive declines including memory, executive function, visuospatial skills, and processing speed in normally aging adults. Prior aging studies focused largely on the effects of medium to long term (>6 months) exercise training; however, the shorter term effects have not been studied. In the present study, we examined changes in brain blood flow, cognition, and fitness in 37 cognitively healthy sedentary adults (57-75 years of age) who were randomized into physical training or a wait-list control group. The physical training group received supervised aerobic exercise for 3 sessions per week 1 h each for 12 weeks. Participants' cognitive, cardiovascular fitness and resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) were assessed at baseline (T1), mid (T2), and post-training (T3). We found higher resting CBF in the anterior cingulate region in the physical training group as compared to the control group from T1 to T3. Cognitive gains were manifested in the exercise group's improved immediate and delayed memory performance from T1 to T3 which also showed a significant positive association with increases in both left and right hippocampal CBF identified earlier in the time course at T2. Additionally, the two cardiovascular parameters, VO2 max and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) showed gains, compared to the control group. These data suggest that even shorter term aerobic exercise can facilitate neuroplasticity to reduce both the biological and cognitive consequences of aging to benefit brain health in sedentary adults. © 2013 Chapman, Aslan, Spence, DeFina, Keebler, Didehbani and Lu. Source


Trademark
The Cooper Institute | Date: 2011-09-06

Computer software for use in nutrition and educational assessment and instruction for children and youth, and materials included therewith, namely, instructional computer manuals, printed assessment reports in the field of nutrition, and printed educational and teaching materials in the field of nutrition, sold as a unit.


Trademark
The Cooper Institute | Date: 2013-01-28

Software as a service featuring software for use in fitness, nutrition, educational testing and assessments for children and youth; collecting data obtained from the testing and assessment and reporting of the results; educational services, namely, providing on-line nutritional education, physical activity and assessments video games.


Trademark
The Cooper Institute | Date: 2015-04-29

Computer software in the field of physical fitness, namely, computer software for use in database management, analytics and electronic storage of data used as an assessment and reporting tool for physical fitness. Providing temporary use of a web-based software application for use in database management, analytics and electronic storage of data in the field of physical fitness; Providing temporary use of a non-downloadable web application for use in database management, analytics and electronic storage of data in the field of physical fitness providing; Software as a service, namely, hosting digital content on the Internet in the nature of software for use by others promoting physical fitness in school children by providing a standardized physical fitness test, collecting the data obtained from the testing, and reporting the results to each child.

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