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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Girls Who Code founder and CEO Reshma Saujani will deliver the address at Scripps College’s 87th Commencement exercises on Saturday, May 13, 2017. Saujani founded Girls Who Code in 2012 as a national nonprofit organization to help close the gender gap in technology by equipping young women with the computing skills to pursue 21st-century opportunities. Saujani is also the author of the book, Women Who Don’t Wait in Line, in which she advocates for a new model of female leadership focused on embracing risk and failure, promoting mentorship and sponsorship, and charting one’s own course, personally and professionally. “Saujani is inspiring and passionate about issues that matter to our young women. I am delighted that she will join us for commencement and eagerly anticipate her address to the Class of 2017,” Scripps College President Lara Tiedens said. Saujani began her career as an attorney and activist. In 2010, she entered the political scene as the first Indian American woman to run for U.S. Congress. During the race, Reshma visited local schools and saw the gender gap in computing classes firsthand, which led her to start Girls Who Code. She has also served as Deputy Public Advocate for New York City. She is a graduate of the University of Illinois, Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and Yale Law School. “I believe deeply that supporting young girls to be courageous and to learn to program are two important traits needed to move us forward as a society,” Saujani says. “I am delighted to speak to Scripps College Class of 2017 students who stand at the intersection of liberal arts and technology, and who have demonstrated their courage as change makers on campus, in their communities, and in their respective paths in life as they graduate.” Meagan McIntyre, a Scripps College senior class representative, noted her class’s reciprocal interest in Saujani as their commencement speaker. “As an influential woman in the technology industry with a commitment to promoting STEM education for girls, Reshma Saujani is an inspiration not only to Scripps' Class of 2017, but to women everywhere,” McIntyre said. “With her leadership in promoting gender equity as well as her courage to take risks, Reshma embodies the integrity and idealism that our community values. We are honored and very excited to have her speak at our commencement.” Saujani has been named one of Fortune’s 40 under 40, a Wall Street Journal Magazine Innovator of the Year, one of the 50 Most Powerful Women in New York by the New York Daily News, CNBC’s Next List, Forbes’s Most Powerful Women Changing the World, Fast Company’s 100 Most Creative People, Crain’s New York 40 Under 40, Ad Age’s Creativity 50, and Business Insider’s 50 Women Who Are Changing the World. In pointing out that the Scripps selection process may be different than other similar institutions, McIntyre explained that Scripps students reviewed commencement speaker suggestions and input received from over half of their graduation class beginning early in their junior year. The committee compiled a list of about 20 potential speakers and surveyed the entire class on their preferences and top choices. “The selection process is centered on students and strives to find a speaker that captures the values the Class of 2017 shares,” McIntyre said. Scripps College was founded in 1926 by Ellen Browning Scripps, a pioneering philanthropist and influential figure in the worlds of education, publishing, and women’s rights. Today, Scripps is a nationally top-ranked liberal arts college and women’s college with approximately 980 students, and is a member of The Claremont Colleges in Southern California. The mission of Scripps College is to educate women to develop their intellects and talents through active participation in a community of scholars, so that as graduates they may contribute to society through public and private lives of leadership, service, integrity, and creativity.


Urban M.C.,University of Connecticut | Holt R.D.,University of Florida | Gilman S.E.,The Claremont Colleges | Tewksbury J.,University of Washington
Journal of Animal Ecology | Year: 2011

Most predictions about species responses to climate change ignore species interactions. Helland and colleagues (2011) test whether this assumption is valid by evaluating whether ice cover affects competition between brown trout [Salmo trutta (L.)] and Arctic charr [Salvelinus alpines (L.)]. They show that increasing ice cover correlates with lower trout biomass when Arctic charr co-occur, but not in charr's absence. In experiments, charr grew better in the cold, dark environments that typify ice-covered lakes. Decreasing ice cover with warmer winters could mean more trout and fewer charr. More generally, their results provide an excellent example, suggesting that species interactions can strongly modify responses to climate change. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2011 British Ecological Society.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Slovenian philosopher and cultural theorist Slavoj Žižek comes to The Claremont Colleges on February 28 for a talk on political economy and the current political moment. Made possible by a collaboration between Claremont Graduate University and Pomona College, Žižek’s lecture is titled “From Surplus-Value to Surplus-Enjoyment.” Žižek is also a co-founder of the Slovenian Liberal Democratic Party and was named by Foreign Policy as a “Top 100 Global Thinker.” This lecture is free and open to the public. Why: An opportunity to hear a leading public intellectual’s perspective on the current global political climate. Founded in 1925, Claremont Graduate University is one of a select few American universities devoted solely to graduate-level education with more than 2,000 students pursuing graduate degrees in more than 20 distinct areas of study. The university belongs to a consortium of schools in Southern California that includes Pomona College, Pitzer College, Claremont McKenna College, Scripps College, Harvey Mudd College, and Keck Graduate Institute.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Department of Justice (DOJ) Office on Violence Against Women recently announced The Claremont Colleges will receive a grant totaling $749,998 to help students who are victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. The DOJ award will strengthen existing resources and fund new programming and supportive services delivered by the EmPOWER Center, established in 2015. The funding will benefit students from all seven of The Claremont Colleges, which include Scripps, Harvey Mudd, Pomona, Claremont McKenna, and Pitzer Colleges; and graduate schools Keck Graduate Institute and Claremont Graduate University. The Claremont Colleges were among 45 colleges and universities in the nation, and the only higher education institutions in California, to receive the DOJ award. “We are extremely pleased to be able to expand the important work of assisting the seven campuses deliver effective, comprehensive, and coordinated strategies supporting survivors, reducing campus sexual violence, and improving our institutions’ responses to these incidences,” said Charlotte Johnson, Scripps vice president for student affairs and dean of students, who will serve as lead administrator for the funding. Johnson and Sharon Basso, vice president for student affairs and dean of students at Claremont McKenna College, jointly oversee the EmPOWER Center on behalf of The Claremont Colleges. Johnson explained that funds assigned to the project will support services, education, and programming provided by The Claremont Colleges, Claremont University Consortium, and community partners, which include House of Ruth, Project Sister, and the Claremont Police Department. Johnson anticipates the funding will allow the EmPOWER Center and its partners to serve more than 12,500 students at The Claremont Colleges over the next three years. “The DOJ funding further underscores The Claremont Colleges’ leadership role in addressing these issues,” Johnson added. Under Director Rima Shah, the EmPOWER Center has significantly increased the number of students reached through orientation and other year-round education programs to build awareness and prevent sexual and dating violence on campuses, has established an expanded 7C student advisory board whose members meet monthly, and collaborates closely with student advocate groups who provide confidential peer-to-peer support. Since its official opening in January 2016, the seven-college program has also successfully doubled its in-house counseling hours; increased awareness about resources; successfully launched a healthy masculinity initiative aimed at involving male-identifying students across the consortium in programming around consent, rape culture, and healthy relationships; implemented confidential support groups and collaborative trainings for professional and student staff who most often come in contact with survivors. In addition to the work of the EmPOWER Center, each college supports its own Title IX office to combat sexual harassment, gender-based discrimination, and sexual violence. “We are so excited for the tremendous resources this grant will bring to the 7Cs. It will help strengthen and expand our efforts and go a long way in helping to build a community of care at the colleges,” said EmPOWER Center director, Rima Shah. The EmPOWER Center serves undergraduate institutions Scripps, Harvey Mudd, Pomona, Claremont McKenna, and Pitzer Colleges; and graduate schools Keck Graduate Institute and Claremont Graduate University, the seven-college consortium known as The Claremont Colleges. EmPOWER Center seeks to collaborate closely with students, staff, faculty, and community partners to build awareness and sensitivity around issues related to sexual violence, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking through prevention education, information dissemination, and training programs for students, staff, and faculty. The Center also provides counseling and holistic support to 7C students impacted by these forms of violence.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Claremont University Consortium has received a $1.5 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to establish a new Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) to help faculty members enhance their teaching through programming, consultation services and support programs. The design of the CTL has been informed by research on teaching and learning centers and is designed to assist faculty in adopting evidence-based, student-centered teaching strategies while building capacity for the colleges to carry out the work of making excellence inclusive. The Center for Teaching and Learning will be the first major collaborative initiative on teaching and learning across the The Claremont Colleges. It will support existing teaching-related efforts at the colleges and facilitate the sharing of effective teaching strategies. The Center will work with the Academic Deans Committee of The Claremont Colleges to share knowledge and offer programs and services, including workshops, seminars and institutes. Scripps College will serve as lead college for this effort, with Amy Marcus-Newhall, vice president for academic affairs and dean of faculty at Scripps, serving as lead dean. For its first two years, the CTL will be led by Darryl Yong, on leave from Harvey Mudd College, where he is a professor of mathematics. He is well known at Harvey Mudd and the other Claremont Colleges for his knowledge of pedagogy, outstanding teaching ability and commitment to inclusive pedagogy. While Yong is a mathematician, he is a math/music double major (HMC ’96) and has worked closely with faculty members in many disciplines in his role as associate dean for diversity during the past five years. He directed HMC’s Mellon Foundation-supported summer bridge program and is also an investigator on a flipped classroom study with HMC professors Nancy Lape, Eliot Bush and Rachel Levy. “The CTL will have significant and positive effects on the quality of instruction in classrooms across The Claremont Colleges. It is so exciting to have Darryl Yong take on the inaugural directorship,” says Marcus-Newhall. “Faculty will undoubtedly view the CTL as a valuable resource to further develop their teaching pedagogies through innovative and inclusive best practices.” The Claremont Colleges seek to address the value of inclusiveness and the persistent realities of exclusivity by creating welcoming learning environments through inclusive pedagogy and curricula. The CTL will help faculty adopt these practices to promote more equitable outcomes for students. “Faculty have a direct influence on helping students feel welcome at our institutions as well as helping them learn,” says Yong. Yong and other CTL staff will be housed in Honnold Library, a facility shared by all of the colleges. The CTL aspires to serve as a catalyst for collaboration across The Claremont Colleges on matters relating to teaching and learning by supporting the work that the institutions are already doing, connecting faculty to needed expertise, advancing the scholarship of teaching and learning and supporting departmental and institutional initiatives. The CTL is one of several collaborations among The Claremont Colleges. Recent projects include the Faculty Career Enhancement Program, the launch of a 5-College Environmental Analysis Program, a 5-College project to develop new resources in the digital humanities, and targeted initiatives at individual colleges. To learn more about the Center for Teaching and Learning, visit http://teaching.claremont.edu.


Angert A.L.,Colorado State University | Crozier L.G.,National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Rissler L.J.,University of Alabama | Gilman S.E.,The Claremont Colleges | And 2 more authors.
Ecology Letters | Year: 2011

Although some organisms have moved to higher elevations and latitudes in response to recent climate change, there is little consensus regarding the capacity of different species to track rapid climate change via range shifts. Understanding species' abilities to shift ranges has important implications for assessing extinction risk and predicting future community structure. At an expanding front, colonization rates are determined jointly by rates of reproduction and dispersal. In addition, establishment of viable populations requires that individuals find suitable resources in novel habitats. Thus, species with greater dispersal ability, reproductive rate and ecological generalization should be more likely to expand into new regions under climate change. Here, we assess current evidence for the relationship between leading-edge range shifts and species' traits. We found expected relationships for several datasets, including diet breadth in North American Passeriformes and egg-laying habitat in British Odonata. However, models generally had low explanatory power. Thus, even statistically and biologically meaningful relationships are unlikely to be of predictive utility for conservation and management. Trait-based range shift forecasts face several challenges, including quantifying relevant natural history variation across large numbers of species and coupling these data with extrinsic factors such as habitat fragmentation and availability. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

War, indigenous cultures and inner transformation ferment in Revolution and Ritual: The Photographs of Sara Castrejón, Graciela Iturbide and Tatiana Parcero, at the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery of Scripps College from Aug. 26, 2017–Jan.7, 2018. Scripps College joins 70 other cultural institutions in Southern California who are participating in the Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA art exhibitions and programs sponsored by the Getty Foundation in the coming year. In this exhibition, the Williamson focuses on the works of three Mexican women photographers who explore and transform notions of Mexican identity in images that range from the documentary to the poetic. An opening reception will be held at the gallery on Sat., Sept. 9 from 7-9 p.m. Earlier that day, from 3-4 pm, a panel discussion on the exhibition will take place. These events are free and open to the public. “This is the first exhibition in the US to feature Sara Castrejón,” commented Dr. Mary MacNaughton, project director. “It is a rare opportunity to see the works of one of the few women photographers of the Mexican revolution—and the one who most thoroughly documented the struggle.” While Castrejón’s photos portray people under the intense pressure of war, Graciela Iturbide’s images shed light on life in Mexico’s indigenous cultures. Tatiana Parcero takes the medium in yet another direction, creating self-portraits that incorporate spliced images of her body with cosmological maps and Aztec codices. By bringing their work into conversation, Revolution and Ritual invites readers to consider how photography has been transformed over the past century in Mexico and how it continues to respond to artists’ interest in representing present and past, self and other. The exhibit draws on Scripps College’s academic strength in feminist and gender studies and the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery’s expanding photography collection, with its special emphasis on women who have shaped the photographic field. This exhibition will be accompanied by a full-color catalog with essays by leading scholars in Latin American photography, including John Mraz (Photographing the Mexican Revolution, 2012), Marta Dahó (Graciela Iturbide, 2011), and Esther Gabara (Errant Modernism: The Ethos of Photography in Mexico and Brazil, 2008), and plates devoted to each artist. The catalog will be distributed by Getty Publications. Revolution and Ritual is part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. Supported by grants from the Getty Foundation, Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA takes place from September 2017 through January 2018 at cultural institutions across Southern California, from Los Angeles to Palm Springs, and from San Diego to Santa Barbara. Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of the Getty. The presenting sponsor is Bank of America. The Williamson Gallery received lead grants from the Getty in support of the planning and implementation of the exhibition and publication. The gallery is located on the Scripps College campus at 251 E. 11th Street in Claremont, CA. During exhibitions, the gallery is open to the public, free of charge, Wed. through Sun., from noon-5 p.m. For more information, please visit rcwg.scrippscollege.edu, call (909) 607-3397 or contact kdelman@scrippscollege.edu Scripps College was founded in 1926 by Ellen Browning Scripps, a pioneering philanthropist and influential figure in the worlds of education, publishing, and women’s rights. Today, Scripps is a nationally top-ranked liberal arts college and women’s college with approximately 950 students, and is a member of The Claremont Colleges in Southern California. The mission of Scripps College is to educate women to develop their intellects and talents through active participation in a community of scholars, so that as graduates they may contribute to society through public and private lives of leadership, service, integrity, and creativity.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

On the evening of Tuesday, November 15, 2016, Keck Graduate Institute(KGI) hosted the Claremont community for a historic ribbon-cutting ceremony at its new office spaces on the corner of North Indian Hill and First Street in the Claremont Village. The event celebrated KGI’s growth as an institution and its geographic expansion to the Claremont Village. KGI’s main campus remains directly south of the Claremont Village with access from Indian Hill and Santa Fe. As the sun set, members of the Claremont community, colleagues from The Claremont Colleges, and KGI faculty and staff gathered around the stage outside the building. The ceremony began with KGI President Sheldon Schuster, Claremont Mayor Sam Pedroza, Claremont Chamber of Commerce Chair Nikki Coulas, and KGI Deans Kathy Webster, Sofia Toro, and Larry Grill on stage. Also in attendance were Mayor Pro Tem Larry Schroeder and City Manager Tony Ramos. President Schuster welcomed the crowd that had gathered on the walkway and sidewalk outside. Schuster spoke about what the new building meant to KGI: “Looking beyond its physical space, this building is a testament to KGI’s growth as an institution.” Schuster talked about the benefits of KGI joining the Claremont Village. He explained that the design of the building’s interior was intended to inspire, motivate, and prepare students for success. The building features “a variety of spaces conducive to the collaborations and team projects that are a hallmark of a KGI education,” said Schuster. Mayor Pedroza spoke about the creative use of the building and presented Schuster with a certificate from the city, as, he said with a smile, it was the “first of many certificates we’re going to be bringing to KGI.” Following the mayor, Chamber of Commerce Chair Nikki Coulas presented Schuster with a plaque from the Chamber of Commerce, saying, “On behalf of the Chamber of Commerce, we are very excited on your move north into town.” Coulas also praised the beautiful interior of the building. While the deans held the ends of a teal ribbon, President Schuster and Mayor Pedroza took hold of the scissors, together, and cut through the ribbon. Later in the evening, while discussing the new space with guests, President Schuster said, “It’s a symbol—the ribbon. It’s cutting a ribbon with the past.” The ribbon-cutting symbolizes a new era of possibilities for KGI. A tour of the new space followed the ceremony. The tour revealed student collaboration spaces, administrative offices, and conference rooms. Most rooms are equipped with whiteboard walls and updated technology to make it easy for students, faculty, and staff to communicate their ideas. As guests mingled with students, faculty, and staff, they were offered refreshments, information about KGI, and the opportunity to purchase KGI merchandise from Huntley Bookstore. The event also featured artist Michael Cooper, who drew a large whiteboard mural on the wall of the third floor conference room. Guests watched the mural unfold before their eyes, as they discussed KGI, science, and their connections to one another. The mural was a colorful interconnected scientific burst, which nicely mirrored the excitement and energy of the evening.


Grinberg Y.Y.,University of Chicago | Milton J.G.,The Claremont Colleges | Kraig R.P.,University of Chicago
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Spreading depression (SD) is thought to cause migraine aura, and perhaps migraine, and includes a transient loss of synaptic activity preceded and followed by increased neuronal excitability. Activated microglia influence neuronal activity and play an important role in homeostatic synaptic scaling via release of cytokines. Furthermore, enhanced neuronal function activates microglia to not only secrete cytokines but also to increase the motility of their branches, with somata remaining stationary. While SD also increases the release of cytokines from microglia, the effects on microglial movement from its synaptic activity fluctuations are unknown. Accordingly, we used time-lapse imaging of rat hippocampal slice cultures to probe for microglial movement associated with SD. We observed that in uninjured brain whole microglial cells moved. The movements were well described by the type of Lévy flight known to be associated with an optimal search pattern. Hours after SD, when synaptic activity rose, microglial cell movement was significantly increased. To test how synaptic activity influenced microglial movement, we enhanced neuronal activity with chemical long-term potentiation or LPS and abolished it with TTX. We found that microglial movement was significantly decreased by enhanced neuronal activity and significantly increased by activity blockade. Finally, application of glutamate and ATP to mimic restoration of synaptic activity in the presence of TTX stopped microglial movement that was otherwise seen with TTX. Thus, synaptic activity retains microglial cells in place and an absence of synaptic activity sends them off to influence wider expanses of brain. Perhaps increased microglial movements after SD are a long-lasting, and thus maladaptive, response in which these cells increase neuronal activity via contact or paracrine signaling, which results in increased susceptibility of larger brain areas to SD. If true, then targeting mechanisms that retard activity-dependent microglial Lévy flights may be a novel means to reduce susceptibility to migraine. © 2011 Grinberg et al.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

In 2013, the family of Tia Palermo, a longtime resident of Livingston County, established a scholarship at Scripps College in her memory. Through her dedication and hard work, Tia supported herself as she obtained a bachelor’s degree in education. One of her daughters, Zoe Ravich McNitt ’12, attended Scripps College, a private women’s liberal arts college in Southern California. She says, “My parents both believed in the power of women’s education, and my mother adored the Scripps College campus and what the college stood for as a women’s institution.” Scripps College welcomes applications from students in the upstate New York counties of Livingston, Wyoming, Orleans, Genesee, Erie, Niagara and Monroe to apply for admission. If admitted, an incoming student from one of these counties who demonstrates financial need would be eligible for the Tia Palermo Scholarship, which provides anywhere from a partial to a full scholarship as determined by that student’s demonstrated financial need. For more information about applying to Scripps College, please visit http://www.scrippscollege.edu, call (909) 621-8149, or email admission(at)scrippscollege(dot)edu. For questions about applying or about financial aid, please visit: http://www.scrippscollege.edu/admission/. Interested parents or students may also contact Patrick Moore, Director of Financial Aid at Scripps College at 909-621-8275 or pmoore(at)scrippscollege(dot)edu. Scripps College was founded in 1926 by Ellen Browning Scripps, a pioneering philanthropist and influential figure in the worlds of education, publishing, and women’s rights. Today, Scripps is a nationally top-ranked liberal arts college and women’s college with approximately 980 students, and is a member of The Claremont Colleges in Southern California. The mission of Scripps College is to educate women to develop their intellects and talents through active participation in a community of scholars, so that as graduates they may contribute to society through public and private lives of leadership, service, integrity, and creativity.

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