Manchester, United Kingdom
Manchester, United Kingdom

Time filter

Source Type

Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.1-2 | Award Amount: 15.56M | Year: 2011

Europe has a number of advantages as regards developing translational cancer research, yet there is no clear European strategy to meet the increasing burden posed by cancer. The FP6 Eurocan\Plus project analysed the barriers underlying the increasing fragmentation of cancer research and stressed the need to improve collaboration between basic/preclinical and comprehensive cancer centres (CCCs), institutions in which care and prevention is integrated with research and education. Furthermore, it proposed the creation of a platform of interlinked cancer centres with shared infrastructures and collaborative projects to facilitate rapid advances in knowledge, and their translation into better cancer care. In response to these challenges and in line with the call, EurocanPlatform will work towards the goal of decreasing cancer mortality by dealing with three main areas of strategic research: prevention, early detection and improved treatments. It will build the necessary resources and know-how for the entire research continuum: basic research, early and late translational research, clinical research, epidemiological research, implementation in care and population based outcome research. There will be a strong focus on discovery-driven translational cancer research in five selected tumours: breast, head-neck, lung, malignant melanoma and pancreatic cancer. Joint structures and programmes for early detection will contribute to optimal treatment, and novel prevention research programmes will integrate prevention activities in clinical cancer centres as well as public prevention. Collaborations will also include molecular pathway-driven clinical research supported by joint structures for omics, biobanking and biomarker validation to support clinical trials aimed at enhancing patient benefits by individualised treatments. EurocanPlatform is unique in its nature and represents a commitment from cancer centres to join forces and resources in order to fight cancer.


News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In a second boost for Manchester in as many months, a single city-wide bid has been awarded £12.5m by the Department of Health to fund the cutting-edge research space, highly trained staff and specialist equipment required to develop and deliver pioneering new treatments across three NHS sites in Greater Manchester. This new award is a major achievement for Greater Manchester Devolution, demonstrating synergy that can only be achieved by bringing together clinical and research expertise from across health and academia to deliver patient-orientated commercial and academic clinical research studies. It will enable expansion of existing clinical research capacity across Manchester and is hosted by Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CMFT) in partnership with The Christie NHS Foundation Trust (The Christie), University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust (UHSM) and The University of Manchester. Clinical Research Facilities (CRF) at CMFT, The Christie and UHSM, currently facilitate a total of 6500 visits per year from patients and healthy volunteers involved in research studies. They provide 24-hour, seven-day inpatient and outpatient research services, including those for children and infants, with over 50 research beds and 20 outpatient consultation rooms across Greater Manchester. Manchester's unique proposal will make research more accessible to people of all ages and backgrounds across the city region, as well as expanding the volume and types of research undertaken. In September, the Department of Health announced a £28.5m investment in Manchester under its Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) scheme, which recognises Manchester's international reputation and will drive forward research in the areas of musculoskeletal disease, hearing health, respiratory disease, dermatology and three cancer themes (prevention, radiotherapy and precision medicine). This latest investment is provided under the NIHR Clinical Research Facility Scheme and will enable the Manchester CRFs to support researchers working in these areas and many others, representing major causes of premature death and disability for patients in Manchester and beyond. The Manchester CRFs are supported by the Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC). Lord Peter Smith, Chair of Greater Manchester Health and Social Care Partnership Board said: "This reinforces Manchester's strong credentials in experimental medicine. The CRFs will play a key role in working with patients, academic and commercial research partners to implement the Greater Manchester Health and Social Care Devolution." Professor Nick Webb, Director of the Manchester CRF explained: "Our new One Manchester approach consolidates assets across our CRFs and will explore novel ways to drive efficiencies and maximise the impact of our research across Greater Manchester. "We know that disease burden remains disproportionately high in Manchester and especially in socially disadvantaged groups. Working with the BRC and NHS organisations across Manchester, our focus will be to increase accessibility of research for people of all ages and backgrounds right across the city region and beyond." Sir Michael Deegan, Chief Executive at CMFT said: "Experimental medicine studies can be extremely complex and intensive, requiring specialist facilities. This investment will enable us to expand our world-leading research in this area and provide more patients in Manchester with the opportunity to trial new medicines." Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell, President & Vice-Chancellor at The University of Manchester, added: "We're delighted to receive this investment, which recognises the excellent research infrastructure we already have in Manchester and will help to further accelerate the translation of basic laboratory research through to treatments that benefit patients." Minister for Public Health and Innovation Nicola Blackwood said: "Our investment in this area so far has led to a variety of breakthroughs, including the first new asthma treatment in a decade, and a promising treatment for peanut allergies in children, to name just two. "We know that such ground breaking clinical research simply would not happen without the support of these Clinical Research Facilities. "I'm delighted to announce this funding to support the skilled personnel and cutting-edge facilities we need to keep Manchester at the forefront of clinical research."


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.2.4.1-3 | Award Amount: 7.82M | Year: 2013

Long-term side-effects of radiotherapy impact on the quality-of-life (QoL) of cancer survivors. These side-effects could be reduced if predicted in advance. Previous work identified clinical and biological predictors but a major, coordinated approach is needed to validate them so they can be used clinically. The EU has ~17.8 million people living with a prior diagnosis of cancer of whom ~7 million received radiotherapy. In the long-term, potentially 20% of those suffering with mild to severe side-effects (~1.4 million) might benefit from alleviation of symptoms, with resulting reductions in the cost of care in the EU. REQUITE aims to develop validated clinical models and incorporate biomarkers to identify before treatment cancer patients at risk of side-effects and use the models to design interventional trials aimed at reducing side-effects and improving QoL in cancer survivors who underwent radiotherapy. REQUITE will: 1. carry out a multi-centre, longitudinal, observational study to collect standardised data and samples in breast, prostate and lung cancer patients; 2. validate biomarkers with published evidence of predictive value; 3. replicate published clinical models and incorporate replicated biomarkers to create validated predictive algorithms; 4. use the prospectively validated models and biomarkers to design interventional trial protocols aiming to reduce side-effects and improve QoL in high-risk patients. REQUITE builds on collaborations with a proven history of data sharing, enlarged to a consortium with expertise in patient recruitment, knowledge management, biomarker testing and predictive model development. SME involvement for biomarker assays will facilitate future clinical implementation and commercial exploitation. The outcome of this project will be validated predictive models for three common cancers and trial protocols using the models to investigate interventions aimed at reducing long-term side-effects and improving the QoL of cancer survivors.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 | Award Amount: 2.84M | Year: 2009

Considerable resources are devoted to fighting cancer throughout Europe, yet these efforts are not producing the results that health practitioners and citizens might expect. This is partly due to the fragmentation and duplication of research efforts within Member states and the lack of co-ordination at European level. However it can also be attributed to the need to retain and most importantly develop researchers within the EU who have the research skills required to make a real contribution to cancer treatment. The need for quality researchers is particularly acute within the emerging interdisciplinary field of Adoptive Cell Therapy. This promising advance in cancer treatment is based on the exploitation of tumour immunology and genetic technology and built on the specific ideas and techniques originally proposed by the European and Israeli scientists who are members of the ATTRACT network. To facilitate further development within the field of adoptive cell therapy, it is crucial that a co-ordinated and intersectoral approach (combining both the research community and industry) is taken, an approach that broadens the portfolio of skills currently retained within the EU research community. Through the integration Europes undisputed leaders in the field of adoptive cell therapy established in the 2005 FP6 ATTACK project, the ATTRACT network aims to foster the development of a pool of ESRs and ERs by equipping them with the multidisciplinary and complementary skills needed to not only initiate further advances in the field but to become future leaders within the field of adoptive cell therapy for cancer treatment. Such skills are global in demand making each researcher a highly desirable candidate for employment and very mobile across the different career domains.


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Investor / analyst luncheon event on ORY-1001 to be held Monday, December 5th BARCELONA, SPAIN and CAMBRIDGE, MA--(Marketwired - November 14, 2016) - Oryzon Genomics ( : ORY) (ISIN Code: ES0167733015), a public clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company leveraging epigenetics to develop therapies in diseases with strong unmet medical need, today announced that the Company will present preliminary safety and efficacy clinical data of its investigational drug ORY-1001, a LSD1 selective inhibitor, at a poster session at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) 58th Annual Meeting and Exposition, being held December 3-6, 2016 in San Diego, California. Oryzon will host an investor and analyst luncheon on Monday, December 5, 2016 at at 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM PST at the San Diego Marriott Gaslamp Quarter Hotel. Management, investigators Tim Somervaille (The Christie NHS Foundation Trust) and Francesc Bosch (University Hospital Vall d'Hebron), and Roche representative Gwen Nichols (Roche Translational Clinical Research Center) will discuss ORY-1001 Phase I/IIA data in Acute Myeloid Leukemia. The luncheon will be webcast, and an archived version of the webcast will be available for replay following the event and can be accessed on the Oryzon website. Safety, Phamacokinetics (PK), Pharmacodynamics (PD) and Preliminary Activity in Acute Leukemia of Ory-1001, a First-in-Class Inhibitor of Lysine-Specific Histone Demethylase 1A (LSD1/KDM1A): Initial Results from a First-in-Human Phase 1 Study The abstract is available on the official website of ASH-2016 Conference https://ash.confex.com/ash/2016/webprogram/Paper93141.html. ORY-1001 (RG6016), Oryzon's first clinical asset, is a highly potent and selective Lysine Specific Demethylase-1 (LSD1) inhibitor for the treatment of leukemia and other malignancies, currently in Phase I/IIA in Acute leukemia, that was partnered with Roche in a global deal in 2014. Beyond hematological malignancies, LSD1 inhibition has been proposed as a valid therapeutic approach in some solid tumors such as Small cell lung cancer (SCLC). SCLC represents 15% of lung neoplasms and is an aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Survival in refractory settings is typically less than one year, exemplifying the need for more effective therapeutics. Recent published results suggest that epigenetic modulation mediated by LSD1 inhibition may be effective to treat SCLC. About Oryzon Founded in 2000 in Barcelona, Spain, Oryzon (ISIN Code: ES0167733015) is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company considered as the European champion in Epigenetics. The company has one of the strongest portfolios in the field and a clinical asset already partnered with Roche. Oryzon's LSD1 program is currently covered by +20 patent families and has rendered two compounds in clinical trials. In addition, Oryzon has ongoing programs for developing inhibitors against other epigenetic targets. The company has a strong technological platform for biomarker identification and performs biomarker and target validation for a variety of malignant and neurodegenerative diseases. Oryzon's strategy is to develop first in class compounds against novel epigenetic targets through Phase II clinical trials, at which point it is decided on a case-by-case basis to either keep the development in-house or to partner or outlicense the compound for late stage development and commercialization. The company has offices in Barcelona and Cambridge, Massachusetts. For more information, visit www.oryzon.com. FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS This communication contains forward-looking information and statements about Oryzon Genomics, S.A., including financial projections and estimates and their underlying assumptions, statements regarding plans, objectives and expectations with respect to future operations, capital expenditures, synergies, products and services, and statements regarding future performance. Forward-looking statements are statements that are not historical facts and are generally identified by the words "expects", "anticipates", "believes", "intends", "estimates" and similar expressions. Although Oryzon Genomics, S.A. believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, investors and holders of Oryzon Genomics, S.A. shares are cautioned that forward-looking information and statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict and generally beyond the control of Oryzon Genomics, S.A., that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied or projected by, the forward-looking information and statements. These risks and uncertainties include those discussed or identified in the documents sent by Oryzon Genomics, S.A. to the Comisión Nacional del Mercado de Valores, which are accessible to the public. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. The auditors of Oryzon Genomics, S.A, have not reviewed them. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on the forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date they were made. All subsequent oral or written forward-looking statements attributable to Oryzon Genomics, S.A. or any of its members, directors, officers, employees or any persons acting on its behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statement above. All forward-looking statements included herein are based on information available to Oryzon Genomics, S.A. on the date hereof. Except as required by applicable law, Oryzon Genomics, S.A. does not undertake any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.1-9 | Award Amount: 7.93M | Year: 2011

Loco-regional treatment is the mainstay of cancer cures in non small lung and head and neck cancer. For advanced stage cancer, dose intense multimodality treatment is required yet affected by substantial side effects. Our aim is to improve treatment outcome in locally advanced head and neck and lung cancer patients by: 1. Optimizing local control by introducing novel radiation techniques resulting in redistribution of the radiation dose, creating inhomogeneous dose distribution towards the most active part of the tumour instead of conventional homogenous doses. This redistribution can be performed without increase of toxicity. As recently reported radiation accidents in the US demonstrate, QA is of outmost importance for safe radiation delivery in complex treatments. To assure accurate delivery over time, we will monitor both the patients geometry as well as the delivered dose using image guided adaptive plan modifications and 3D in-vivo dosimetric verification. 2. Maximizing the benefit of combined modality treatment Both cisplatin and Cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy have shown to improve local control and survival but both drugs have severe side effects. As these drugs are not active in all patients, there is a large need to select patients which are sensitive to either drug. For this purpose the uptake of Cetuximab will be estimated by imaging tumour uptake with Zr89 labelled Cetuximab, while cisplatin sensitive tumours can be selected by biomarkers. This proposal will: 1 optimise efficiency by selecting patients on treatment specific tumour response predictors and tailoring radiation to most active parts of the tumour. 2 improve quality of life by withholding ineffective, toxic treatments and redistribution of dose. 3 decrease community costs by reserving expensive treatments for those who will benefit. This will be studied in randomized phase II clinical trials in top European institutes, followed by phase III trials outside this proposal.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.1.4-4 | Award Amount: 8.26M | Year: 2012

The aim of this research is to exploit technology for nucleic acid delivery through the clinical testing of adoptive engineered T cells to treat cancer. Recent innovative developments in cancer gene-immunotherapy have led to very encouraging early clinical results. However, the use of engineered T cells is a challenging and complex field with further development and more proof-of-principle trials needed. This proposal builds upon previous EU funded pre-clinical projects and comprises a multidisciplinary and translational research group with wide-ranging relevant expertise. Building on encouraging clinical results targeting NY-ESO-1 in melanoma and the availability of clinical grade vector, the consortium proposes to rapidly initiate two landmark studies in this field: the first to examine the activity of engineered T cells in oesophago-gastric cancer as an example of a hard to treat common epithelial cancer; the second to undertake a randomised phase II study to determine whether an optimised cell production system developed by the partners improves the current clinical response rates in patients with metastatic melanoma treated with NY-ESO-1 targeted T-cells. Success in these trials will enable the consortia and others to carryout larger trials and potentially approval of this type of therapy as a treatment for multiple cancer types. The inclusion of a major industrial partner focused on cell therapy technology and two SMEs focus on the delivery of cell therapy will facilitate future development of this area following these trials; indeed the project also includes plans to further automate and streamline cell processing to facilitate this development. This project would enhance European expertise and competitiveness in an important emerging market. The research will also support the European biotechnology industry which will be important for the exploitation of these therapies and the successful outcome of this project.


Davidson S.,The Christie NHS Foundation Trust
Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology | Year: 2011

Cisplatin-based combinations can potentially improve response rates in patients with cervical cancer, but unacceptable toxicity must be avoided. Quality of life (QoL) measures are increasingly used to assess the benefits versus limitations of chemotherapy regimens. A MEDLINE search of English language publications from January 2000 to December 2008 was conducted using the search terms: 'quality of life' OR 'QoL' OR 'HRQoL' AND 'cervical cancer'. Abstracts from the Association of Clinical Oncology meeting, 2008, were also searched. Article inclusion was based on abstract content. Several cervical cancer therapies have shown response rate improvements in combination with cisplatin, including topotecan and paclitaxel. However, only topotecan/cisplatin demonstrates a significant overall survival advantage over cisplatin monotherapy, while both topotecan/cisplatin and paclitaxel/cisplatin demonstrate comparable impact on QoL to cisplatin alone. Few trials of combination chemotherapy for cervical cancer have directly assessed QoL. The combination of topotecan/cisplatin significantly increases overall survival rates without reducing patient QoL. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Patent
The Christie Nhs Foundation Trust | Date: 2012-06-21

The present invention relates to a phantom for use in the auditing or verification of a proposed radiation therapy regime for administration to a patient. The phantom comprises a housing which is shaped to simulate the anatomical shape of a human head and neck; and a radiation detector module configured to receive at least one radiation detector. The housing defines a cavity in which the radiation detector module can be removeably received such that the radiation detector module occupies a predetermined location within the simulated head and neck of the housing. Said predetermined location encompasses areas of the housing which simulate a target site to which it is proposed to administer radiation to the patient and a location of at least one organ that is susceptible to harm by administration of said radiation.


Patent
The Christie Nhs Foundation Trust | Date: 2012-06-27

The present invention relates to a phantom for use in the auditing or verification of a proposed radiation therapy regime for administration to a patient. The phantom comprises a housing which is shaped to simulate the anatomical shape of a human head and neck; and a radiation detector module configured to receive at least one radiation detector. The housing defines a cavity in which the radiation detector module can be removeably received such that the radiation detector module occupies a predetermined location within the simulated head and neck of the housing. Said predetermined location encompasses areas of the housing which simulate a target site to which it is proposed to administer radiation to the patient and a location of at least one organ that is susceptible to harm by administration of said radiation.

Loading The Christie NHS Foundation Trust collaborators
Loading The Christie NHS Foundation Trust collaborators