The Cardiovascular Research Foundation

New York City, NY, United States

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation

New York City, NY, United States
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News Article | July 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

NEW YORK - July 21, 2017 -The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is pleased to announce that the first issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team is now available online. Structural Heart is an international, peer-reviewed journal focusing on diagnosing and treating diseases of the heart valves, myocardium and great vessels, as well as congenital heart disease, and the importance of the Heart Team in this process. The journal covers topics such as diagnostic techniques, percutaneous interventional procedures, cardiovascular surgery, drug treatment, findings from the laboratory, and clinical trials. "Structural heart disease is one of the most rapidly growing areas within cardiology and the source of some of the most exciting research and clinical advances in the field," said Anthony N. DeMaria, MD, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal and the Judith and Jack White Chair in Cardiology and Founding Director of the Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center at the University of California, San Diego. "The combination of increasing medical need coupled with the availability of innovative new therapies have propelled this field forward, and up until this point there has largely been a void in medical publications devoted to this topic. We hope that Structural Heart will fill that void." Led by a distinguished Editorial Board of recognized international experts in the field, Structural Heart is dedicated to disseminating the latest research and information to members of the Heart Team, as well as the wider medical community interested in structural disorders. "The emergence of structural heart disorders as a prominent part of cardiovascular practice has fostered collaboration among various professional disciplines involved in the care of these patients," said Ori Ben-Yehuda, MD, Deputy Editor of the Journal and Executive Director of the CRF Clinical Trials Center (CTC). "The field continues to be fueled by new, more accurate non-invasive diagnostic assessment, breakthrough interventional and surgical therapy, and the benefit of team decision-making and collaboration. It is our hope that Structural Heart will be a valuable addition to medical literature and an important source of information for Heart Teams around the world." The first issue of Structural Heart features the following articles: A New Home for Structural Heart Disease A. N. DeMaria and O. Ben-Yehuda Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease: New Insights A. C. T. Ng et al. The 2017 ACC/AHA Updated Valve Guidelines Regarding Mitral Regurgitation: The Guidelines Get it Right P. A. Grayburn et al. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Failed Surgical Bioprostheses: Insights from the PARTNER II Valve-in-Valve Registry on Utilizing Baseline Computed-Tomographic Assessment D. Dvir et al. Cardiac Unloading with an Implantable Interatrial Shunt in Heart Failure: Serial Observations in an Ovine Model of Ischemic Cardiomyopathy N. L. Eigler et al. Left-to-Right Interatrial Shunting: A Novel Treatment for Heart Failure in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy T. P. Vahl A Paradox between LV Mass Regression and Hemodynamic Improvement after Surgical and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement A. Kadkhodayam et al. The Left Ventricular Mass Regression Paradox following Surgical Valve Replacement: A Real Phenomenon or a Mathematical Glitch? P. Pibarot and M. A. Borger Percutaneous Ventricular Restoration Using the Parachute Device: The Parachute III Pressure-Volume Loop Sub-Study T. Patterson et al. Prognostic Value of Combination of Hemodynamic Parameters in Asymptomatic Aortic Valve Stenosis-The COFRASA/GENERAC Study T. Mathieu et al. Assessment and Prognostic Impact of Right Ventricular Function in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Undergoing Pulmonary Artery Denervation: Central Role of Global Right Ventricular Longitudinal Peak Systolic Strain S.-L. Chen et al. The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve the survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and has educated doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease. For more information, visit http://www. .


News Article | July 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Media registration is open online for TCT 2017 (Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics), the annual Scientific Symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF). TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine, attracting nearly 12,000 attendees from 90 countries all over the world. For the first time, TCT will be held in Denver, Colorado. Denver is a vibrant, active city at the base of the Colorado Rocky Mountains known for its stunning natural beauty, a thriving cultural scene, and award-winning dining. Every year, TCT features major medical research breakthroughs and gathers leading researchers and clinicians from around the world to present and discuss the latest evidence-based research in the field. TCT 2017 will also highlight state-of-the-art techniques and hands-on training, as well as high-definition live case transmissions. To learn more about the conference, please visit http://www. . Heart disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Every year, the discoveries made through hundreds of studies and late breaking trials presented at TCT lead to advancements in new medicines and devices that ultimately lead to improved care for patients with heart disease. Media may apply for registration by visiting: http://www. Details on required press credentials can be found at: http://www. The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and has educated doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease. Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. Now in its 29th year, TCT features major medical research breakthroughs and gathers leading researchers and clinicians from around the world to present and discuss the latest evidence-based research in the field. For more information, visit http://www. and http://www. .


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

NEW YORK - May 9, 2017 - The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free seminar, "Broken Hearts: Living with Heart Failure," on Tuesday, June 6, 2017 for heart failure patients and caregivers at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. The seminar, part of a series of Mini-Med Schools conducted by the CRF Women's Heart Health Initiative, will focus on providing both patients and caregivers a deeper understanding of heart failure, its symptoms, and treatment options. Heart failure occurs when the heart cannot pump enough blood and oxygen to support other organs in the body. According to the American Heart Association, the number of people diagnosed with heart failure is increasing and is projected to rise 46% by 2030, resulting in more than 8 million people living with the disease. "This rapid rise in heart failure rates inspired the CRF Women's Heart Health Initiative to educate both men and women on this important subject," said Nisha Jhalani, MD, Director of the CRF Women's Heart Health Initiative and Director, Clinical and Educational Services for the Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center. "Our goal is to have leading experts share their knowledge and provide attendees with the tools they need to take better care of themselves and their loved ones." "We hope to empower patients and their caregivers to take ownership of their health so that they can lead full and active lives," said Melana Yuzefpolskaya, MD, Associate Medical Director of the Cardiac Assisted Device Program at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center. "We want to motivate them to work closely with their physicians to follow treatment plans and closely track their symptoms to better manage their heart failure." The program will include the following presentations from renowned experts in the field: Nisha Jhalani, MD Director, CRF Women's Heart Health Initiative Director, Clinical and Educational Services, Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center Assistant Professor of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center For more information and to register, visit: http://www. . The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and has educated doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease. For more information, visit http://www. . The CRF Women's Heart Health Initiative was founded to help reduce gender disparity in cardiovascular care using a two-pronged approach: advocating for increased female representation in clinical trials and raising awareness about women and heart disease through Mini-Med School educational seminars. For more information, visit http://www. .


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CRF meeting covering the latest in transcatheter valve therapies will celebrate its 10th Anniversary June 14-17 in Chicago The agenda for the TVT (Transcatheter Valve Therapies) is now available online: http://www. . TVT 2017 is a practical three-day course featuring the latest research and state-of-the-art techniques for transcatheter aortic and mitral valve therapies. For 10 years, TVT has provided healthcare professionals with the latest advances, tools, and techniques for the treatment of valvular heart disease using nonsurgical procedures. Some of the noteworthy sessions include: 10-Year Anniversary - Structural Heart Disease and the Evolution of Transcatheter Valve Therapy Thursday, June 15, 2017; 8:00 AM - 8:50 AM Provides an overview of the rapid evolution of transcatheter valve therapies including discussions on guidelines and the impact of therapies on the global burden of heart failure. Covers take-home lessons for clinicians on the latest guidelines for managing aortic valve disease, a snapshot of clinical practice in the European Union, the relationship between TAVR procedure volumes and clinical outcomes, the emergence of TAVR programs in Japan, and other topics. Includes an overview and critical appraisal of REPRISE III, how clinical and anatomic factors determine TAVR device selection, and the safety and effectiveness of cerebral embolic protection during TAVR. Closely examines TAVR trials in intermediate-risk aortic stenosis patients (SURTAVI, PARTNER 2a/S3i), in heart failure patients with moderate aortic stenosis (TAVR UNLOAD), and asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (EARLY TAVR). Covers leaflet thrombosis and thickening, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, hemodynamic trends, and other topics. Valvular heart disease affects a large number of people who require diagnostic procedures and long-term management. Many patients have no symptoms, but for others, if not treated, advanced heart valve disease can lead to heart failure, stroke, blood clots, or death due to sudden cardiac arrest. Traditionally, valvular heart disease has been treated with surgical repair or replacement. Over the last several years, there have been important advances in concepts, tools, techniques, and patient selection using nonsurgical procedures. Transcatheter valve intervention offers the potential to reduce the procedural morbidity, mortality, and costs of surgical valve replacement or repair while accelerating patient recovery. The course directors for TVT 2017 are: Media may apply for registration by emailing jromero@crf.org. The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and has educated doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease. For more information, visit http://www. .


News Article | September 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

NEW YORK, NY - Sept. 27, 2017 - The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) has announced the press conference schedule for late-breaking trials and first report investigations that will be presented at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2017 scientific symposium. TCT, the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine, will take place October 29 - November 2 in Denver, Colorado. Late-breaking clinical trials and first report investigations will be presented in the Main Arena and highlighted during press conferences scheduled for Monday, October 30; Tuesday, October 31; Wednesday, November 1; and Thursday, November 2. The complete agenda for TCT 2017 is also available online at http://www. . Browse through a wide array of topics and learn more about individual sessions, presentations, and faculty on the TCT Web site. Media are invited to attend TCT. If you are unable to attend in person, you may still cover it remotely via Virtual TCT. Registering as media ensures that you have access to all the press conferences, trial data, abstracts, and press releases. More information on press credentials and guidelines can be found at http://www. . To apply for press credentials, visit: http://www. . EXCEL QOL: Quality of Life After PCI vs CABG in Left Main Coronary Artery Disease Suzanne J. Baron, MD DKCRUSH-V: A Randomized Trial of Double Kissing Crush vs Provisional Stenting for Treatment of Distal Left Main Bifurcation Lesions Shao-Liang Chen, MD, PhD 8:15 AM HREVS: A Randomized Trial of PCI vs CABG vs Hybrid Revascularization in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Vladimir Ganyukov, MD, PhD HARMONEE: A Randomized Trial of a Bioabsorbable Polymer-Based DES With a Luminal CD34+ Antibody Coating vs a Durable Polymer-Based DES in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Mitchell W. Krucoff, MD DARE: A Randomized Trial of a Drug-Eluting Balloon vs a Metallic DES in Patients With Coronary Artery In-Stent Restenosis Jose P.S. Henriques, MD VAMPIRE 3: A Randomized Trial of Distal Filter Protection During PCI of High-Risk Plaque Kiyoshi Hibi, MD 7:30 AM ABSORB III: 3-Year Outcomes From a Randomized Trial of a Bioresorbable Scaffold vs a Metallic DES in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Stephen G. Ellis, MD ABSORB II: 4-Year Outcomes From a Randomized Trial of a Bioresorbable Scaffold vs a Metallic DES in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease PARTNER 2A and SAPIEN 3 Cost-effectiveness: Cost-effectiveness of TAVR vs SAVR in Intermediate-Risk Patients With Aortic Stenosis David J. Cohen, MD, MSc ABSORB IV: 30-Day Outcomes From a Randomized Trial of a Bioresorbable Scaffold vs a Metallic DES in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Gregg W. Stone, MD CrossBoss First: A Randomized Trial of Antegrade Dissection and Re-entry vs Standard Wire Escalation for Crossing Coronary Artery Chronic Total Occlusions Emmanouil S. Brilakis, MD REVASC: A Randomized Trial to Assess Recovery of Left Ventricular Function After PCI of Coronary Artery Chronic Total Occlusions Kambis Mashayekhi, MD FAVOR II China: Diagnostic Accuracy of the Angiographic Quantitative Flow Ratio in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Xu Bo, MBBS FAVOR II Europe Japan: Diagnostic Accuracy of the Angiographic Quantitative Flow Ratio in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease SENIOR: A Randomized Trial of a Bioabsorbable Polymer-Based Metallic DES vs a BMS With Short DAPT in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Older Than 75 Years Olivier Varenne, MD, PhD DAPT STEMI: A Randomized Trial of 6-Month vs 12-Month DAPT After DES Implantation in STEMI Elvin Kedhi, MD, PhD REDUCE: A Randomized Trial of 3-Month vs 12-Month DAPT After Implantation of a Bioabsorbable Polymer-Based Metallic DES With a Luminal CD34+ Antibody Coating in Patients With ACS Harry Suryapranata, MD, PhD MITRAL: 30-Day Outcomes of Transcatheter MV Replacement in Patients With Severe Mitral Valve Disease Secondary to Mitral Annular Calcification or Failed Annuloplasty Rings Mayra Guerrero, MD INTREPID: 30-Day Outcomes of Transcatheter MV Replacement in Patients With Severe Mitral Regurgitation Paul Sorajja, MD TENDYNE: 1-Year Outcomes of Transcatheter MV Replacement in Patients With Severe Mitral Regurgitation David W.M. Muller, MBBS, MD TRACER: 6-Month Outcomes of Transcatheter MV Neochordal Repair in Patients With Severe Primary Mitral Regurgitation James S. Gammie, MD MAVERIC: 6-Month Outcomes of Transcatheter MV Repair in Patients With Severe Secondary Mitral Regurgitation Stephen G. Worthley, MBBS, PhD PREVAIL: 5-Year Outcomes From a Randomized Trial of Left Atrial Appendage Closure vs Medical Therapy in Patients With Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation Vivek Y. Reddy, MD ORBITA: A Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial of PCI in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Rasha Al-Lamee, MD FAME 2: 3-Year Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Outcomes of FFR-Guided PCI in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease William F. Fearon, MD TRI-REPAIR: 30-Day Outcomes of Transcatheter TV Repair in Patients With Severe Secondary Tricuspid Regurgitation Georg Nickenig, MD FORMA: 30-Day Outcomes of Transcatheter TV Repair in Patients With Severe Secondary Tricuspid Regurgitation Susheel K. Kodali, MD Receive updates on Twitter at http://twitter. and http://twitter. . The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and educate doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease. Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. Now in its 29th year, TCT features major medical research breakthroughs and gathers leading researchers and clinicians from around the world to present and discuss the latest evidence-based research in the field. For more information, visit http://www. and http://www. .


News Article | September 12, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

NEW YORK, NY - September 12, 2017 - The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) has announced the 12 late-breaking trials and 16 first report investigations that will be presented at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2017 scientific symposium. TCT, the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine, will take place October 29 - November 2, 2017 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado. Every year, TCT features major medical research breakthroughs and highlights the latest data on the most innovative treatments that will impact patient care and how physicians treat heart disease, the leading cause of death in the world. The studies selected examine the safety and effectiveness of minimally invasive techniques, pharmaceuticals, technologies, and devices that show potential to treat or prevent cardiovascular disease. Late-breaking clinical trials and first report investigations will be presented in the Main Arena and highlighted during press conferences scheduled for Monday, October 30; Tuesday, October 31; Wednesday, November 1; and Thursday, November 2. TCT press conferences will be held each morning beginning at 7:30 AM MT. The complete agenda for TCT 2017 is now available online at http://www. . Browse through a wide array of topics and learn more about individual sessions, presentations, and faculty. Media are invited to attend TCT and can apply for media credentials at: http://www. . * EXCEL QOL: Quality of Life After PCI vs CABG in Left Main Coronary Artery Disease Suzanne J. Baron * DKCRUSH-V: A Randomized Trial of Double Kissing Crush vs Provisional Stenting for Treatment of Distal Left Main Bifurcation Lesions Shao-Liang Chen * HREVS: A Randomized Trial of PCI vs CABG vs Hybrid Revascularization in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Vladimir Ganyukov * HARMONEE: A Randomized Trial of a Bioabsorbable Polymer-Based DES With a Luminal CD34+ Antibody Coating vs a Durable Polymer-Based DES in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Shigeru Saito * DARE: A Randomized Trial of a Drug-Eluting Balloon vs a Metallic DES in Patients With Coronary Artery In-Stent Restenosis Jose P.S. Henriques * VAMPIRE 3: A Randomized Trial of Distal Filter Protection During PCI of High-Risk Plaque Kiyoshi Hibi * ABSORB IV: 30-Day Outcomes From a Randomized Trial of a Bioresorbable Scaffold vs a Metallic DES in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Gregg W. Stone * ABSORB III: 3-Year Outcomes From a Randomized Trial of a Bioresorbable Scaffold vs a Metallic DES in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Stephen G. Ellis * PARTNER 2A and SAPIEN 3 Cost-effectiveness: Cost-effectiveness of TAVR vs SAVR in Intermediate-Risk Patients With Aortic Stenosis David J. Cohen * ABSORB II: 4-Year Outcomes From a Randomized Trial of a Bioresorbable Scaffold vs a Metallic DES in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Bernard R. Chevalier * CrossBoss First: A Randomized Trial of Antegrade Dissection and Re-entry vs Standard Wire Escalation for Crossing Coronary Artery Chronic Total Occlusions Emmanouil S. Brilakis * REVASC: A Randomized Trial to Assess Recovery of Left Ventricular Function After PCI of Coronary Artery Chronic Total Occlusions Kambis Mashayekhi * FAVOR II China: Diagnostic Accuracy of the Angiographic Quantitative Flow Ratio in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Bo Xu * FAVOR II Europe Japan: Diagnostic Accuracy of the Angiographic Quantitative Flow Ratio in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Jelmer Westra * SENIOR: A Randomized Trial of a Bioabsorbable Polymer-Based Metallic DES vs a BMS With Short DAPT in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Older Than 75 Years Olivier Varenne * DAPT STEMI: A Randomized Trial of 6-Month vs 12-Month DAPT After DES Implantation in STEMI Elvin Kedhi * REDUCE: A Randomized Trial of 3-Month vs 12-Month DAPT After Implantation of a Bioabsorbable Polymer-Based Metallic DES With a Luminal CD34+ Antibody Coating in Patients With ACS Harry Suryapranata * MITRAL: 30-Day Outcomes of Transcatheter MV Replacement in Patients With Severe Mitral Valve Disease Secondary to Mitral Annular Calcification or Failed Annuloplasty Rings Mayra Guerrero * INTREPID: 30-Day Outcomes of Transcatheter MV Replacement in Patients With Severe Mitral Regurgitation Paul Sorajja * TENDYNE: 1-Year Outcomes of Transcatheter MV Replacement in Patients With Severe Mitral Regurgitation David W.M. Muller * TRACER: 6-Month Outcomes of Transcatheter MV Neochordal Repair in Patients With Severe Primary Mitral Regurgitation James S. Gammie * MAVERIC: 6-Month Outcomes of Transcatheter MV Repair in Patients With Severe Secondary Mitral Regurgitation Stephen G. Worthley * PREVAIL: 5-Year Outcomes From a Randomized Trial of Left Atrial Appendage Closure vs Medical Therapy in Patients With Non-Valvular Atrial FibrillationVivek Y. Reddy * ORBITA: A Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial of PCI in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Rasha Al-Lamee * FAME 2: 3-Year Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Outcomes of FFR-Guided PCI in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease William F. Fearon * TRI-REPAIR: 30-Day Outcomes of Transcatheter TV Repair in Patients With Severe Secondary Tricuspid Regurgitation Georg Nickenig * FORMA: 30-Day Outcomes of Transcatheter TV Repair in Patients With Severe Secondary Tricuspid Regurgitation Susheel K. Kodali Receive updates on Twitter at http://twitter. and http://twitter. . The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and educate doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease. Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. Now in its 29th year, TCT features major medical research breakthroughs and gathers leading researchers and clinicians from around the world to present and discuss the latest evidence-based research in the field. For more information, visit http://www. and http://www. .


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Study indicates PCI of NIRS-defined lipid-rich plaque is safe and not associated with a greater incidence of adverse outcomes compared to PCI of non lipid-rich plaque WASHINGTON - November 1, 2016 - Two-year results from COLOR, the first large-scale multicenter prospective study of its kind, found that PCI on coronary artery lipid-rich plaque (LRP) detected by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was not associated with subsequent major adverse cardiac events (MACE) compared to PCI of non-LRPs. Findings were reported today at the 28th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. The clinical impact of lipid-rich plaque (LRP) in patients with coronary atherosclerosis undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is poorly understood. Autopsy-based studies have suggested that LRP may be associated with increased PCI risk and subsequent events. Catheter-based near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can identify the presence and extent of LRP in the coronary artery. Previous case reports, as well as small studies, have suggested an association between LRP as assessed by NIRS and peri-procedural outcomes after PCI. The COLOR registry was a prospective, multicenter, observational study designed to determine whether LRP detected by NIRS is associated with subsequent major adverse cardiac events (MACE). LRP was detected using an intracoronary NIRS imaging catheter that provides an assessment of coronary lipid distribution. Lipid core burden index (LCBI) was calculated as the fraction of yellow pixels within a scanned region multiplied by 1000. A total of 1,899 patients at 22 sites in the United States underwent NIRS during a clinically indicated catheterization procedure. The primary endpoint was MACE (a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, revascularization and hospitalization) at two years. MACE occurring within two years were adjudicated by an independent clinical events committee and further classified as to whether they arose from the originally treated coronary segments (culprit) or untreated segments (non-culprit). The relationship between baseline LCBI and MACE at two years was also evaluated. Pre-intervention NIRS of treated coronary segment(s) was available in 1,168 patients (1,265 lesions), and NIRS of untreated segment(s) was available in 927 patients (1,072 lesions). The overall rate of MACE at two years was 14.1% for all patients, 6.0% related to the culprit lesion, 8.3% related to the non-culprit lesion related, and 2.4% indeterminate. Culprit lesion related MACE at two years was 6.3% for maxLCBI4mm "In this large-scale registry, non-culprit lesion related events were a little more common than culprit lesion post-PCI related events during two-year follow-up," said Giora Weisz, MD, Chairman of Cardiology at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, Israel. "The results also indicate that PCI of NIRS-defined lipid rich plaques was safe, and was not associated with increased peri-procedural or long-term adverse outcomes compared to PCI of non-LRPs. Additional studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of NIRS-defined non-culprit LPRs." The COLOR trial was funded by InfraReDx, Inc. Dr. Weisz reported being a medical advisory board member for AngioSlide, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Calore, Corindus, Medtronic, Medivisor, MI Medical Incentives, TriSol, and Vectorius. He also disclosed grant/research support from AngioSlide, Boehringer Ingelheim, Corindus, and Matrizyme, as well as ownership in Filterlex. The results of the COLOR Trial will be presented on Tuesday, November 1 at 12:30 PM ET in the Main Arena (Ballroom, Level 3) at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and has educated doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease. Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. Now in its 28th year, TCT features major medical research breakthroughs and gathers leading researchers and clinicians from around the world to present and discuss the latest evidence-based research in the field. For more information, visit http://www. and http://www. .


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Initial results of LAA closure device for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation demonstrate device safety and low rates of major adverse events WASHINGTON - November 2, 2016 - Initial results from the largest, prospective evaluation of a percutaneous transcatheter left atrial appendage (LAA) closure device (Amplatzer Amulet) for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation show that the device has a high implant success rate and low major adverse events. Findings from the AMULET OBSERVATIONAL STUDY were reported today at the 28th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. The study enrolled 1,073 patients between June 2015 and September 2016 at 64 clinical sites in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Australia and South America. 1,060 patients had device implantation, giving a technical success rate of 98.8%. Major adverse events (MAEs) within 7 days of implant included ischemic stroke (0.3%, n=3), pericardial effusion requiring intervention (0.5%, n=5), embolization (0.1%, n=1), and bleeding (0.9%, n=10). There were three deaths (0.2%) that occurred within seven days of attempted implant, two of which were adjudicated as procedure or device related, and one as unrelated to the device. At 1-3 month follow-up, the majority of patients were on antiplatelet therapy only and the CoreLab analyzed results of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) showed a closure rate of 99%. "These results indicate that the Amplatzer Amulet is safe and associated with low rates of peri-procedural and early adverse events, as well as demonstrating high closure rates," said David Hildick-Smith, MD, from the Sussex Cardiac Centre, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals in Brighton, United Kingdom. "In addition, antiplatelet therapy appears to be an effective treatment strategy post-implantation in the short-term. Additional long-term data is necessary to confirm these promising early findings." The AMULET trial was funded by St. Jude Medical. Dr. Hildick-Smith reported grant/research support and consulting fees/honoraria from St Jude Medical, Boston Scientific, Medtronic, Gore, Abbott, Occlutech and Edwards. The results of the AMULET OBSERVATIONAL STUDY will be presented on Wednesday, November 2 at 9:40 AM ET in the Main Arena (Ballroom, Level 3) in the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and has educated doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease. Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. Now in its 28th year, TCT features major medical research breakthroughs and gathers leading researchers and clinicians from around the world to present and discuss the latest evidence-based research in the field. For more information, visit http://www. and http://www. .


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WASHINGTON - November 1, 2016 - Final results from the RESPECT trial found that percutaneously closing a patent foramen ovale (PFO) using the Amplatzer PFO Occluder was superior to medical management in the prevention of recurrent ischemic stroke in patients who previously had a cryptogenic stroke. Findings were reported today at the 28th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the device for recurrent stroke prevention in patients with a PFO and history of cryptogenic stroke on the basis of these data. A PFO is a small hole between the atria that did not close completely early in life and which can allow a venous system clot to enter the left atrium and travel to the brain causing a stroke. Current guidelines call for medical management with anticoagulants or antiplatelet drugs for patients with PFO following a cryptogenic stroke. The RESPECT study examined the use of a device that closes the hole percutaneously versus medical management. From 2003 to 2011, a total of 980 subjects between 18 and 60 years of age were randomized to PFO Closure (N=499) or medical management (N=481) at 69 sites in the United States and Canada. The newest study results further extended follow-up, analyzing data from August 2003 through May 2016 for outcomes of recurrent ischemic strokes and recurrent ischemic strokes of unknown mechanism. The mean follow-up for the PFO group was 6.3 years and 5.5 years for the medical management group [total patient years: 3,141 (PFO) and 2,669 (medical management)]. Key findings showed that in the intention-to-treat cohort, there was a 45% relative risk reduction [HR 0.55 (95% CI: 0.305, 0.999) Log-rank 2-sided P-value: 0.046] in recurrent ischemic stroke for the PFO group and a 62% risk reduction [HR 0.38 (95% CI: 0.18, 0.79) Log-rank 2-sided P-value: 0.007] from recurrent ischemic stroke of unkown mechanism. An additional sensitivity analysis of all-cause stroke in patients under age 60 showed a 58% relative risk reduction [HR 0.42 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.83) Log-rank 2-sided P-value=0.010). Technical success (delivery and release of the device) of the PFO closure was 99.1% and procedural success (implantation without in-hospital serious adverse event) was 96.1%. In addition, there were no intra-procedural strokes, device embolization, device thrombosis or device erosion. Major vascular complications (0.9%) and device explants (0.4%) were also low. "The long-term results of the RESPECT trial show that PFO closure was more beneficial than medical management alone in reducing recurrent stroke," said David E. Thaler, MD, PhD, Chairman of the Department of Neurology, Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine, Associate Professor of Neurology, Tufts University School of Medicine and Director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Tufts Medical Center. "PFO closure can be considered an appropriate treatment option for patients with cryptogenic stroke to reduce their risk of recurrent stroke, but collaboration between a cardiologist and neurologist is important for proper patient selection." The RESPECT trial was funded by St. Jude Medical. Dr. Thaler reported consulting fees/honoraria from St. Jude Medical. The results of the RESPECT Trial will be presented on Tuesday, November 1 at 12:15 PM ET in the Main Arena (Ballroom, Level 3) at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and has educated doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease. Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. Now in its 28th year, TCT features major medical research breakthroughs and gathers leading researchers and clinicians from around the world to present and discuss the latest evidence-based research in the field. For more information, visit http://www. and http://www. .


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WASHINGTON - October 30, 2016 - The large multinational randomized BIONICS study found that a novel ridaforolimus-eluting stent (BioNIR) was non-inferior to a zotarolimus-eluting stent (Resolute) for one-year clinical outcomes in a broad, less selected 'more comers' population. Results of this trial will be submitted to the FDA for U.S. approval of this novel drug-eluting stent. Findings were reported today at the 28th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. The ridaforolimus-eluting stent is a thin-strut (90 μm) cobalt chromium stent that elutes the rapamycin analogue ridaforolimus from a durable elastomeric polymeric coating. The multicenter randomized trial was conducted at 76 medical centers in the U.S., Canada, Europe, and Israel and enrolled a broad range of patients with coronary artery disease including patients with Non-ST Elevation MI (NSTEMI) as well as complex lesions. The primary endpoint was target lesion failure (TLF) at one year, the composite rate of cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction (TV-MI), and ischemia driven target lesion revascularization (ID-TLR). Secondary endpoints were one year major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), target vessel failure (TVF) and individual component endpoints, definite/probable stent thrombosis and procedural success. A total of 1,919 patients were randomized 1:1 to the BioNIR ridaforolimus-eluting stent (n= 958, 1,275 lesions) or Resolute zotarolimus-eluting stent (n=961, 1,277 lesions) stent. The baseline clinical characteristics were well balanced between the two arms, as were angiographic baseline characteristics with the exception of severe calcification (13.3% in the BioNIR group vs. 10.5% in the Resolute group, P=0.03). The primary endpoint of TLF at one year was identical for both at 5.3% (P=0.98). In addition, the rates of cardiac death (0.5% vs. 0.2%, P=0.29), TV-MI (3.1% vs. 3.3%, P=0.81) and ID-TLR (3.0% vs. 2.4%, P=0.38) were similar. Definite/probable stent thrombosis was 0.4% (4/921) for the ridaforolimus-eluting stent and 0.6% (6/927) for the zotarolimus-eluting stent (P=0.75). Device success was 98.3% for the ridaforolimus-eluting compared to 99.5% for the zotarolimus-eluting stent (P=0.004). "One-year clinical outcomes from the BIONICS study clearly show that the ridaforolimus-eluting stent was non-inferior to the zotarolimus-eluting stent with identical target lesion failure rates," said principal investigator, David E. Kandzari, MD. Dr. Kandzari is Director of Interventional Cardiology and Chief Scientific Officer at the Piedmont Heart Institute in Atlanta, GA. "In addition, it had a low stent thrombosis rate with no events beyond 30 days." The BIONICS trial was funded by Medinol and designed and conducted by the CRF Clinical Trials Center in collaboration with Novella Clinical which provided site management. Dr. Kandzari reported grant or research support from Abbott Vascular, Boston Scientific, Medtronic, Biotronik, St. Jude Medical/Thoratec, and Ablative Solutions, and consulting fees/honoraria from Boston Scientific, Medtronic, Micell Technologies, and St. Jude Medical. The results of the BIONICS Trial will be presented on Sunday, October 30 at 9:40 AM ET in the Main Arena (Ballroom, Level 3) of the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is a nonprofit research and educational organization dedicated to helping doctors improve survival and quality of life for people suffering from heart and vascular disease. For over 25 years, CRF has helped pioneer innovations in interventional cardiology and has educated doctors on the latest treatments for heart disease. Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. Now in its 28th year, TCT features major medical research breakthroughs and gathers leading researchers and clinicians from around the world to present and discuss the latest evidence-based research in the field. For more information, visit http://www. and http://www. .

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