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Buaban S.,The Bureau of Biotechnology in Livestock Production | Kuchida K.,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine | Suzuki M.,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine | Masuda Y.,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine | And 2 more authors.
Animal Science Journal | Year: 2016

This study was designed to: (i) estimate genetic parameters and breeding values for conception rates (CR) using the repeatability threshold model (RP-THM) and random regression threshold models (RR-THM); and (ii) compare covariance functions for modeling the additive genetic (AG) and permanent environmental (PE) effects in the RR-THM. The CR was defined as the outcome of an insemination. A data set of 130 592 first-lactation insemination records of 55 789 Thai dairy cows, calving between 1996 and 2011, was used in the analyses. All models included fixed effects of year × month of insemination, breed × day in milk to insemination class and age at calving. The random effects consisted of herd × year interaction, service sire, PE, AG and residual. Variance components were estimated using a Bayesian method via Gibbs sampling. Heritability estimates of CR ranged from 0.032 to 0.067, 0.037 to 0.165 and 0.045 to 0.218 for RR-THM with the second, third and fourth-order of Legendre polynomials, respectively. The heritability estimated from RP-THM was 0.056. Model comparisons based on goodness of fit, predictive abilities, predicted service results of animal, and pattern of genetic parameter estimates, indicated that the model which fit the desired outcome of insemination was the RR-THM with two regression coefficients. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science Source


Buaban S.,The Bureau of Biotechnology in Livestock Production | Duangjinda M.,Khon Kaen University | Suzuki M.,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine | Masuda Y.,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2015

The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for various fertility traits on Holstein upgraded dairy heifers and cows in a smallholder system under tropical conditions using data sets from the Thailand national recording scheme. The investigated traits were age at first service (AFS), age at first calving (AFC), days from calving to first service (DTFS), days between first and last service (DFLS), days open (DO), calving interval (CI), number of services per conception (NSPC), and conception at first service (FSC). The data consisted of 68,555, 34,401, and 54,004 records on heifers, primiparous, and multiparous cows, respectively, calving between 1996 and 2011. Gibbs sampling was employed to obtain (co)variance components using both univariate and bivariate analyses with linear and threshold animal models. Virgin heifers had better fertility performance than primiparous and multiparous cows. The reproductive performance in primiparous cows was inferior compared with multiparous cows. Cows with higher Holstein-Friesian blood showed lower reproductive efficiency. Estimated heritabilities for most of the fertility traits were 0.04 or less except for AFS (0.26) and AFC (0.25). The estimated genetic correlations among fertility traits within parity indicated that selection for cows with high conception rate could lead to shortened DO and CI, as well as DTFS. The FSC and NSPC could be used as the best indicators for heifer and cow fertility and could be complemented by other traits, which were genetically considered as different traits such as DTFS and DFLS in terms of a fertility index. This would enable efficient selection for better fertility. Genetic correlations for fertility traits in primiparous and multiparous cows were very high (>0.90), but those between heifers and cows were lower (0.03 to 0.83). The latter results indicated that fertility traits of heifers and cows should be considered as different traits. © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Source


Buaban S.,The Bureau of Biotechnology in Livestock Production | Duangjinda M.,Khon Kaen University | Suzuki M.,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine | Masuda Y.,Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2015

The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for various fertility traits on Holstein upgraded dairy heifers and cows in a smallholder system under tropical conditions using data sets from the Thailand national recording scheme. The investigated traits were age at first service (AFS), age at first calving (AFC), days from calving to first service (DTFS), days between first and last service (DFLS), days open (DO), calving interval (CI), number of services per conception (NSPC), and conception at first service (FSC). The data consisted of 68,555, 34,401, and 54,004 records on heifers, primiparous, and multiparous cows, respectively, calving between 1996 and 2011. Gibbs sampling was employed to obtain (co)variance components using both univariate and bivariate analyses with linear and threshold animal models. Virgin heifers had better fertility performance than primiparous and multiparous cows. The reproductive performance in primiparous cows was inferior compared with multiparous cows. Cows with higher Holstein-Friesian blood showed lower reproductive efficiency. Estimated heritabilities for most of the fertility traits were 0.04 or less except for AFS (0.26) and AFC (0.25). The estimated genetic correlations among fertility traits within parity indicated that selection for cows with high conception rate could lead to shortened DO and CI, as well as DTFS. The FSC and NSPC could be used as the best indicators for heifer and cow fertility and could be complemented by other traits, which were genetically considered as different traits such as DTFS and DFLS in terms of a fertility index. This would enable efficient selection for better fertility. Genetic correlations for fertility traits in primiparous and multiparous cows were very high (>0.90), but those between heifers and cows were lower (0.03 to 0.83). The latter results indicated that fertility traits of heifers and cows should be considered as different traits. © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Source

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