Westerville, OH, United States

The American Ceramic Society

www.ceramics.org
Westerville, OH, United States

The American Ceramic Society is a non-profit professional association for the ceramics and glass community, with a focus on scientific research, emerging technologies, and practical applications. It comprises more than 10,000 members from 80 countries, with membership including engineers, scientists, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, students, and marketing and sales representatives. It is located in Westerville, Ohio. Visit ceramics.org to explore the ways ACerS can help navigate this unique class of materials. Wikipedia.

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Thomas J.J.,Schlumberger | Thomas J.J.,The American Ceramic Society | Musso S.,Schlumberger | Prestini I.,Schlumberger
Journal of the American Ceramic Society | Year: 2014

The kinetics of hydration of magnesium oxide (MgO) powder to form magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) were measured using isothermal calorimetry at different temperatures, and the morphology of the powders before and after hydration were examined. The hydration kinetics of light-burned MgO exhibit a hydration rate peak similar to that of portland cement hydration, whereas the hydration kinetics of hard-burned MgO are comparatively slower at the same temperature, and exhibit a continuously declining hydration rate after the first several minutes of reaction. The hydration kinetics of both lightburned and hard-burned MgO can be fit using a boundary nucleation and growth model that has previously been applied to the hydration of portland cement and tricalcium silicate. Activation energy values for MgO hydration were determined from the fitted rate constants and were also measured directly using small temperature excursions according to a recently proposed method. For light-burned MgO the resulting values are in good agreement and indicate a value of 77 kJ/mol. For the hard-burned MgO the activation energy values vary considerably depending on temperature and how the activation energy is measured, but are always lower than the value obtained for the light-burned MgO. © 2013 The American Ceramic Society.


Vienna J.D.,Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | Vienna J.D.,The American Ceramic Society
International Journal of Applied Glass Science | Year: 2010

Nuclear power plays a key role in maintaining current worldwide energy growth while minimizing the greenhouse gas emissions. A disposition path for used nuclear fuel (UNF) must be found for this technology to achieve its promise. One likely option is to recycle UNF and immobilize the high-level waste (HLW) by vitrification. Vitrification is the technology of choice for immobilizing HLW from defense and commercial fuel reprocessing around the world. Recent advances in both recycling technology and vitrification show great promise in closing the U.S. nuclear fuel cycle in an efficient fashion. This article summarizes the recent trends, developments, and future options in waste vitrification for both defense waste cleanup and closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States. © 2010 The American Ceramic Society and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Liu C.,Wuhan University of Technology | Heo J.,Pohang University of Science and Technology | Heo J.,The American Ceramic Society
International Journal of Applied Glass Science | Year: 2013

Tunable absorption and photoluminescence (PL) of lead chalcogenide quantum dots (QDs) doped in glasses due to the quantum confinements effect have been actively investigated for application as saturable absorbers, laser sources, and fiber-optic amplifiers. Optical properties of QDs have been carefully monitored by controlling their sizes through heat treatment and rare-earth ion doping. Two- and three-dimensional precipitation of lead chalcogenide QDs were also realized using silver ion exchange and femtosecond laser irradiation in combination with thermal treatment. Prototypes of microstructured single-mode fibers and tapered fiber amplifiers containing QDs proved potentials of these materials for fiber-optic amplifiers application. Further research works on QD-doped solid core fibers, surface passivation of quantum dots and their application for the mid-infrared optical devices are necessary. © 2013 The American Ceramic Society and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Mellott N.P.,Alfred University | Mellott N.P.,The American Ceramic Society | Pantano C.G.,Pennsylvania State University
International Journal of Applied Glass Science | Year: 2013

Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and solution analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to investigate the molecular scale processes responsible for the roughening of glass surfaces due to aqueous corrosion. The study of atomically smooth fiber and melt surfaces allowed direct investigation of the atomic and molecular scale effects of dissolution on surface roughness. The combined use of these analytical techniques clearly showed that the change in RMS roughness with aqueous corrosion could be directly related to the concentration of silica released to solution from the glass; cation leaching alone did not generate detectable roughening. It is well known that nano-/microscale surface roughness can influence strength, optical response, adsorptivity, and other surface properties of glass. It is shown here that the roughening of silicate glass surfaces can be expected based on the amount of silica released from the glass and does not show a dependence on the extent of modifier ion leaching. It is also suggested that the glass composition dependence of this roughening may be a measure of the nanoscale heterogeneity of the glass network structure. © 2013 The American Ceramic Society and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Garino T.J.,Sandia National Laboratories | Garino T.J.,The American Ceramic Society | Nenoff T.M.,Sandia National Laboratories | Krumhansl J.L.,Sandia National Laboratories | Rademacher D.X.,Sandia National Laboratories
Journal of the American Ceramic Society | Year: 2011

Spent nuclear fuel contains 129I, which is of particular concern due to its very long half-life, its potential mobility in the environment, and its deleterious effect on human health. In spent fuel reprocessing schemes under consideration, a gas stream containing 129I2 would be passed through a bed of Ag-loaded zeolites such as Ag-mordenite (Ag-MOR). We have investigated the use of a low-temperature sintering bismuth-silicon-zinc- oxide glass powder mixed with either AgI or AgI-MOR to produce dense glass composite material waste forms that can be processed at 550°C, where AgI volatility is low. We have demonstrated that when fine silver flake is added to the mixture, any adsorbed I2 released during heating of AgI-MOR reacts with the silver to form AgI in situ. Furthermore, we have shown that mixtures of the glass with the AgI-MOR or AgI are durable in aqueous environments. Finally, we have developed a process to fabricate core/shell waste forms where the core of AgI-MOR or AgI and glass is encased in a shell of glass that protects the core from contact with the environment. To prevent cracking of the shell due to thermal expansion mismatch between the core and shell, amorphous silica was added to the shell to form a composite with a lower coefficient of thermal expansion. © 2011 The American Ceramic Society.


Wray P.E.,The American Ceramic Society
Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings | Year: 2010

Scientific and technical developments coupled with a surge in demand in emerging markets for industrial and consumer goods have begun to accentuate current and potential problems with sourcing strategic minerals and metals. This includes materials already in broad usage in major industries (e.g., bauxite) and materials whose usage is expected to grow geometrically and that are linked to significant progressive societal developments (lithium and rare earths). While, in theory, the amount of reserves of these special raw materials may be adequate, their location and ownership, often in underdeveloped nations, is transforming the bargaining powers and interests of various owners, businesses and governments. Some nations and enterprises appear to be grasping the significance of the materials problems and are taking aggressive geopolitical steps to manage their long-terms risks. Other nations, such as the United States, appear more lackadaisical and disorganized in their approach and arguably are increasing the risk of negative outcomes to their economic, scientific and diplomatic standings. Nations that will be in the best position are those that are making sober and multipronged assessments of the risks posed by materials shortages and are willing to move apace to take methodical multilateral steps to address these risks.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 24.60K | Year: 2012

NON-TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION: This project supports a workshop focused on the professional development and networking of Principal Investigators (PIs) who have active National Science Foundation (NSF) grants from the Ceramics Program in the Division of Materials Research. The goals of workshop are to: (1) educate PIs about the NSF proposal submission, review, award, oversight and management processes; (2) provide an environment for researchers within the field of ceramics to collaborate and share information about their research projects; (3) improve communication about research accomplishments; (4) address key issues in the field; and (5) engage PIs in discussions to improve processes to help the American Ceramic Society (ACerS) and NSF increase the effectiveness of ceramics research. As well, ACerS will continue to develop the website for this community (http://ceramics.org/knowledge-center/national-science-foundation/) that showcases the accomplishments of the NSF-funded researchers and educators in ceramics. Specifically, this website links together researchers, abstracts of their NSF-funded projects, publications, press releases and other highlights.

TECHNICAL DETAILS: This two-day workshop will take place June 13-14, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia. Each participant will provide both an oral and poster presentation highlighting their research and education activities. The core part of the workshop includes sessions about writing effective highlights; reporting requirements; delivering your opinion in proposal reviews; news about NSF merit review and funding opportunities; the Materials Genome Initiative; facilities, instrumentation and cooperation in the USA; American competitiveness and innovation; broadening participation; and the Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP). As well, an additional discussion topic will focus on the roles and responsibilities of PIs, professional societies and government agencies. A post-workshop tutorial will cover: aspects of NSF proposal submissions.


The website for the 2012 meeting will be found on this list: http://ceramics.org/meetings/event-calendar.
Website for 2011 Ceramics PI workshop: http://ceramics.org/knowledge-center/national-science-foundation/nsf-ceramic-materials-pi-workshop-2011-archive
and the website for 2010 Ceramics PI workshop: http://ceramics.org/meetings/meetings-archives/nsf-ceramic-materials-pi-workshop-archive.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 39.12K | Year: 2010

NON-TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION: This project supports a workshop focused on the professional development of Principal Investigators (PIs) who have active National Science Foundation (NFS) grants from the Ceramics Program in the Division of Materials Research, and the development of a website for this community. The goals of workshop are to: (1) educate PIs about the NSF proposal submission, review, award and oversight processes; (2) provide an environment for researchers within the field of ceramics to collaborate and share information about their research projects; (3) improve communication about research accomplishments; and (3) engage PIs in discussions about the roles and responsibilities of PIs, professional societies and funding agencies. As well, a website will be developed that will better showcase the accomplishments of the NSF-funded researchers and educators in ceramics.

TECHNICAL DETAILS: This two-day workshop will take place in early September 2010 at NSF Headquarters. Topics that will be covered include: the NSF review process; the solicitation Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI); NSF project accomplishments and reporting requirements; Government Performance Results Act (GPRA) highlights and press releases; and the roles and responsibilities of PIs, professional societies and NSF. At the end of the workshop, a discussion and survey will be conducted with the participants to inform future PI meetings. The resulting website will link together researchers, abstracts of their NSF-funded projects, publications, press releases and other highlights.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 14.90K | Year: 2010

The purpose of this award is to support the participation of undergraduate students at the 112th Annual American Ceramic Society (ACerS) meeting to be held in conjunction with the annual 2010 Materials Science and Technology Meeting (MS&T-10) in Houston, TX, October 17-21, 2010. This meeting brings together people across the entire spectrum of activities in the Ceramics community. The funds will be used to cover the cost of conference registration, travel to Houston, TX and per diem for 20 US students. The costs of a facility tour during the conference, as well as participation in the ACerS Annual Awards and Honors Banquet, will also be covered. All the students will be expected to give an oral presentation at the meeting, assuming his or her abstract is accepted.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 23.34K | Year: 2011

NON-TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION: This project supports a workshop focused on the professional development and networking of Principal Investigators (PIs) who have active National Science Foundation (NSF) grants from the Ceramics Program in the Division of Materials Research. The goals of workshop are to: (1) educate PIs about the NSF proposal submission, review, award, oversight and management processes; (2) provide an environment for researchers within the field of ceramics to collaborate and share information about their research projects; (3) improve communication about research accomplishments; (4) address key issues in the field; and (5) engage PIs in discussions to improve processes to help the American Ceramic Society (ACerS) and NSF increase the effectiveness of ceramics research. As well, ACerS will continue to develop the website for this community (http://ceramics.org/knowledge-center/national-science-foundation/) that showcases the accomplishments of the NSF-funded researchers and educators in ceramics. Specifically, this website links together researchers, abstracts of their NSF-funded projects, publications, press releases and other highlights.

TECHNICAL DETAILS: This two-day workshop will take place July 28-29, 2011 in Arlington, Virginia. Each participant will provide both an oral and poster presentation highlighting their research and education activities. The core part of the workshop includes sessions about data management, publishing in high profile journals, membership and studies at the National Academies, and issues resulting in the underrepresentation of women in science. As well, an additional discussion topic will focus on the roles and responsibilities of PIs, professional societies and government agencies. Pre- and post-workshop tutorials cover: NSF reporting requirements, writing press releases for the public, key aspects of NSF proposal submissions, and delivering your opinion in proposal reviews.

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