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Bangkok, Thailand

Friend R.M.,Institute for Social and Environmental Transition ISET International | Thinphanga P.,Thailand Environment Institute | Macclune K.,Institute for Social and Environmental Transition ISET International | Henceroth J.,Institute for Social and Environmental Transition ISET International | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment | Year: 2015

Purpose – This paper aims to fill a conceptual gap in the understanding of rapidly changing characteristics of local risk, addressing how the notion of the local might be reframed, and how opportunities for multi-scale interventions for disaster risk reduction might be identified. Design/methodology/approach – The paper illustrates the significance of the systems and services on which urbanization depends – water, food, energy, transport and communications – to consider the cascading impacts at multiple scales often beyond the administrative boundaries of cities, and how vulnerabilities and risks are distributed unevenly across different groups of people. Findings – The process of rapid urbanization in the Mekong Region represents a fundamental transformation of ecological landscapes, resource flows, livelihoods and demographics. In addition to the location of urbanization, it is these transformative processes and the critical dependence on inter-linked systems that shape the overall picture of urban disaster and climate vulnerability. Research limitations/implications – By drawing on research and practical experience in two of the most rapidly urbanizing countries in the world, Thailand and Vietnam, the approach and findings have implications for understanding global patterns of urbanization. Practical implications – The paper contributes to considering practical actions whether in terms of policy or project implementation for both the assessment of disaster and climate risk, and for actions to reduce vulnerability and promote resilience. Social implications – The paper draws largely from social science perspectives, highlighting the dynamism of social organization in urbanizing contexts, and the implications for risk and vulnerability. Originality/value – The paper draws on original research in Thailand and Vietnam that takes urbanization as the starting point for assessing vulnerability and risk. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Source


Reed S.O.,Institute for Social and Environmental Transition International ISET | Friend R.,Institute for Social & Environmental Transition International | Jarvie J.,Mercy Corps | Henceroth J.,Institute for Social & Environmental Transition International | And 4 more authors.
Climate and Development | Year: 2014

The capacity of actors and institutions to learn and reorganize is central to the resilience of complex systems, particularly in the context of rapidly urbanizing cities. A process of qualitative, reflective research among practitioners within the Asian Cities Climate Change Resilience Network (ACCCRN) showed that development projects and programmes can contribute meaningfully to this capacity when they introduce projects as “experiments”. While projects did provide desired tangible benefits to certain groups of actors, many of the most significant contributions to resilience were related to knowledge, networks, information, and greater engagement of citizens with the state. This emphasis on the capacity to learn and reorganize provides a counterpoint to ideas around “implementation” and “mainstreaming” normally promoted within climate change adaptation practice – and, importantly, can help enrich these practices to maximize their effectiveness. This paper focuses on international development projects in particular, although findings have implications for other types of adaptation and resilience initiatives supported by governments, private sector, or community-based organizations. © 2014 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis. Source


Henceroth J.,Institute for Social and Environmental Transition ISET International | Friend R.M.,Institute for Social and Environmental Transition ISET International | Thinphanga P.,Thailand Environment Institute | Van Gai Tran P.,Institute for Social and Environmental Transition ISET International | Nghiem T.P.,Institute for Social and Environmental Transition ISET International
International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment | Year: 2015

Purpose – This paper aims to review and develop lessons learned from the United Nations Office of Disaster Risk Reduction Local Government Self Assessment Tool (LGSAT) experience in four cities. The capacity to understand, learn from and respond to or reorganize in the face of change is at the core of urban resilience to disasters, climate change and major shocks. Self assessments, like the LGSAT, can be used to engage city stakeholders in critically assessing and understanding their capacity according to a set of standards of resilience. Design/methodology/approach – City stakeholders in four cities, Hat Yai and Udon Thani, Thailand and Hue and Lao Cai, Vietnam, completed the LGSAT in an open multi-stakeholder process as part of urban climate resilience programs. Findings – Completing the LGSAT provided important and valuable information about institutional capacity that is important for disaster risk reduction and climate change efforts. Multi-stakeholder processes allowed for greater and more sustained dialogue among groups that may not have a chance to interact regularly and helped build trust and relationships that contribute to climate resilience and disaster risk reduction efforts. Originality/value – Further, the inclusion of multiple viewpoints allowed for more nuanced and novel consideration of issues and in multiple cities led to new projects that focused on building institutional and agent capacity. The LGSAT process relied on facilitation that was able to guide discussion, ensure safe spaces for dialogue and address stakeholder questions. Finally, while the tool was applied to questions of climate change in this process, there is still room to improve the tool to more adequately and directly address issues of climate change risk. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Source


Premrudee K.,National Metal and Materials Technology Center | Jantima U.,National Metal and Materials Technology Center | Kittinan A.,National Metal and Materials Technology Center | Naruetep L.,Thailand Environment Institute | And 2 more authors.
Environment Protection Engineering | Year: 2013

Over the past ten years, the automobile manufacturing basis has shifted to Thailand, thus transforming the country into an automobile industrial hub in Asia. An integral part of this industry, lead acid battery manufacturing has exhibited tremendous growth with increasing trends toward new manufacturing technology. This research aimed to study life cycle assessments of lead-acid automobile battery manufactured in Thailand by comparing conventional batteries with calcium-maintenance free batteries. Global warming and acidification are the largest environmental impacts associated with both battery types. Changing from conventional batteries to calcium-maintenance free batteries is able to reduce environmental impact by approximately 28% due to longer usage life and reduced utilization of manufacturing resources and energy. The greenhouse gases and acidification caused by one conventional battery amounted to 102 kg CO 2 and 0.94 kg SO2, respectively. These amounts decrease to 72 kg CO2 and 0.56 kg S02, respectively, when calcium-maintenance free technology is used. Raw material procurement is found to have the greatest environmental impact, followed by product usage. In this study, the information on environmental impact is incorporated with MET matrix principles to propose guidelines for environmental improvement throughout the battery life cycle. Source

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