Houston, TX, United States
Houston, TX, United States

Texas Southern University is a historically black university located in Houston, Texas, accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.The University was established in 1927 as the Houston Colored Junior College. It developed through its private college phase as the four-year Houston Colored College. On March 3, 1947, the state declared this to be the first state university in Houston; it was renamed Texas State University for Negroes. In 1951, the name changed to Texas Southern University.Texas Southern University is one of the largest and most comprehensive HBCU in the nation. TSU is one of only four independent public universities in Texas and the only HBCU in Texas recognized as one of America's Top Colleges by Forbes magazine. TSU is the leading producer of college degrees to African Americans and Hispanics in Texas and ranks fourth in the nation in doctoral and professional degrees conferred to African Americans. The University is a member-school of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Texas Southern University and The Board Of Regents Of The University Of Texas System | Date: 2016-11-29

The present invention relates to methods for treating an infectious disease in a subject in need thereof via administration of a therapeutically effective amount of compounds described herein. The methods may utilize particular compounds, for example, a quinoline, a hydrazone, a quinone, or a pyrimidine derivative thereof or a pharmaceutical salt thereof.


Patent
Texas Southern University and The Board Of Regents Of The University Of Texas System | Date: 2016-11-29

The present invention relates to methods for treating an infectious disease in a subject in need thereof via administration of a therapeutically effective amount of compounds described herein. The methods may utilize particular compounds, for example, a quinoline, a hydrazone, a quinone, or a pyrimidine derivative thereof or a pharmaceutical salt thereof.


Patent
Texas Southern University | Date: 2016-12-01

The present invention relates to methods for treating an infectious disease in a subject in need thereof via administration of a therapeutically effective amount of compounds described herein. The methods may utilize particular compounds, for example, a quinoline, a hydrazone, a quinone, or a pyrimidine derivative thereof or a pharmaceutical salt thereof.


Patent
Texas Southern University | Date: 2017-02-01

Provided herein are the metalloborane compounds, MOF-metalloborane compositions, and hydrogen storage system used for high density hydrogen storage. The compounds and compositions may have the structure M_(2)B_(6)H_(6 )or MOF-M_(2)B_(6)H_(6)-dicarboxylic acid. Particularly the transition metal M may be titanium or scandium and the MOF may be MOF5. The hydrogen storage systems hydrogen absorbed to the metalloborane compounds or to the MOF-metalloborane compositions. Methods of storing hydrogen are provided comprising flowing or passing hydrogen gas for absorptive contact with the metalloborane compounds or to the MOF-metalloborane compositions. Also provided is a method for calculating the hydrogen storage capacity of a metalloborane is provided in which random sampling of the thermodynamic states of a two-system model of hydrogen in the presence of a metal organic framework-metalloborane crystal structure is used to calculate probability of hydrogen absorption.


Shishodia S.,Texas Southern University
BioFactors | Year: 2013

Curcumin derived from the tropical plant Curcuma longa has a long history of use as a dietary agent, food preservative, and in traditional Asian medicine. It has been used for centuries to treat biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. The preventive and therapeutic properties of curcumin are associated with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Extensive research over several decades has attempted to identify the molecular mechanisms of curcumin action. Curcumin modulates numerous molecular targets by altering their gene expression, signaling pathways, or through direct interaction. Curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1), growth factors (e.g., VEGF, EGF, FGF), growth factor receptors (e.g., EGFR, HER-2, AR), enzymes (e.g., COX-2, LOX, MMP9, MAPK, mTOR, Akt), adhesion molecules (e.g., ELAM-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1), apoptosis related proteins (e.g., Bcl-2, caspases, DR, Fas), and cell cycle proteins (e.g., cyclin D1). Curcumin modulates the activity of several transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1, STAT) and their signaling pathways. Based on its ability to affect multiple targets, curcumin has the potential for the prevention and treatment of various diseases including cancers, arthritis, allergies, atherosclerosis, aging, neurodegenerative disease, hepatic disorders, obesity, diabetes, psoriasis, and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of modulation of gene expression by curcumin. © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 2.25M | Year: 2014

The Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) Program, within the Division of Human Resource Development (HRD), was established by Congressional mandate in 1991 to significantly increase the quality and quantity of students historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) who successfully complete baccalaureate degrees in STEM and who continue to graduate studies in these fields. The Houston alliance is a comprehensive partnership that includes the countrys largest school districts, two community college systems, one doctoral-granting Historically Black College and University (HBCU) and two Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs).

As a senior-level alliance, H-LSAMP will support new efforts in student transition, student support mechanisms for non-traditional students, the inclusion of social support mechanisms to facilitate STEM retention, and the institutionalization of high-impact practices developed during earlier LSAMP funding. Over the five-year project, Houston LSAMP Senior Alliance will: (1) Graduate 4,000 minority students in STEM disciplines, 2) Provide all directly supported students with the opportunity to participate in research activities, 3) Have at least sixty percent of directly supported students attend professional or graduate school, 4) Retain at least eighty percent of minority STEM undergraduates, including transfer students, in STEM majors. Upon completion of the award period, the H-LSAMP project will have provided the opportunity for all supported students to meaningfully participate in research activities, including international research.

Evaluation activities will have three major components. 1) Interviews of participants, staff, and faculty to identify in real time which intervention activities need adjustment, i.e., formative feedback, as well as assess both the measured and perceived impact of project-based activities; 2) Gathering, analyzing, and reporting specific measures that operationalize each project goal or objective; and 3) The use of multivariate models isolating and measuring how the specific intervention strategies and support mechanisms relate to success. Construction of these models will be guided by the literature on academic and social integration, engagement, and achievement, and will draw upon appropriate statistical techniques, e.g., factor analysis and structural equation modeling. The results of these analyses will contribute to the literature on broadening participation and achievement in STEM and serve as a guide for other universities and alliances who share these goals.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 400.00K | Year: 2015

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) through Targeted Infusion Projects supports the development, implementation, and study of evidence-based innovative models and approaches for improving the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may pursue STEM graduate programs and/or careers. The project at Texas Southern University seeks to infuse innovative electrical and computer engineering specialized artificial intelligence (AI) tools into traditional engineering problem-solving routines with a problem-based learning approach to bridge current curricula gaps, enhance engineering students problem-solving and critical thinking skills, expose them to new technology, prepare them for diverse and multidisciplinary workforce requirements, and attract and encourage students to pursue professional engineering licensure or post-graduate studies in engineering field. The activities and strategies are evidence-based and a strong plan for formative and summative evaluation is part of the project.

There are five key objectives: 1) to develop an interactive and comprehensive intelligent database to document, compare, and analyze cutting-edge AI applications in the civil engineering field and use it as the platform and educational media for curricula development and implementation; 2) to develop one new interdisciplinary course AI Tools for Engineering Problem Solving for senior engineering students; 3) to enrich current curricula by integrating innovative AI application case studies into twelve existing civil engineering junior and senior level courses; 4) to foster an interdisciplinary academic setting by hosting a server-based intelligent database; and 5) to support undergraduate students early involvement in research. The project activities can serve as a model for other institutions that desire to strengthen undergraduate education in their engineering and technology programs.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 991.21K | Year: 2014

Platinum group elements derived from automobile catalytic converters have increased in roadside soil, plants, and air. However, little is known about the mechanism of platinum group elements toxicity and its impact on living organisms. With National Science Foundation support, Texas Southern University will initiate a research program that integrates systems biology, genomics, proteomics, and bio-informatics approaches to develop computer models capable of characterizing stress responses in eukaryotic cells as well as understand how environmental toxicants impact bacterial members of the gut microbiota. The project will employ a multidisciplinary team to educate graduate, undergraduate, and rising high school students, expand and strengthen the existing Ph.D. program in Environmental Toxicology, facilitate the professional development of junior faculty, and enhance the institutions research infrastructure.

Intellectual Merit:
The proposed activity will contribute to the current knowledge of environmental exposure to patinum group elements and vanadium and associated biomolecular effects and potential health risks. An array of new technologies and innovative approaches in molecular biology, nanotechnology, and computer modeling will be employed to assess exposure to patinum group elements and vanadium, and study environmental stress responses in eukaryotic cells and gut microbiota. The proposed research will (1) assess the exposure to platinum group elements and vanadium in nano-size atmospheric particulate matter and associated health risk, (2) examine the effect of platinum group elements and vanadium on transcription factors, MAP kinases and pro-inflammatory cytokines in human lung epithelial cells and use computer models to predict the pathways and characterize various responses to platinum group elements in eukaryotic cells, and (3) characterize platinum group elements and vanadium exposure to representative prokaryotic members of the gut microbiota and develop a microbial biosensor for human disease.

Broader Impacts:
The results of this investigation will be employed to develop predictive computer models for biomolecular pathways involved and advanced potential risk prediction tools that can help environmental quality managers make informed decisions in developing more efficient management strategies. In addition, by examining common affected pathways in microbes and eukaryotic cells, simple biological biosensors may be developed for the assessment of the effects of these pollutants on humans. The project combines education and research efforts to prepare high-caliber doctoral scientists in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics related fields by strengthening and expanding the existing Ph.D. program in Environmental Toxicology. By training African-American and other minority undergraduate and graduate students in emerging areas of environmental biology, biomaterials science, bio-engineering, and synthetic biology, the institution will continue to increase the numbers of well-prepared minority professionals engaged in research, teaching, and management, and develop the STEM workforce. Project activities will strengthen the institutions research infrastructure and promote innovative partnerships within scientific communities, enhance basic biology research, technology development/transfers and commercialization.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 400.00K | Year: 2016

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) through Targeted Infusion Projects supports the development, implementation, and study of evidence-based innovative models and approaches for improving the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may pursue science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) graduate programs and/or careers. This project seeks to infuse the undergraduate biology curriculum at Texas Southern University with geospatial informational science and technology (GIST). This will help prepare students to address global challenges in the fields of geospatial information, ecology, environmental science, and natural resource management. The activities and strategies are evidence-based and formative and summative evaluation are an integral part of the project.

This project has the objectives to 1) promote student interest in geospatial informatics thereby addressing the global need for an increasingly diversified geospatial workforce, 2) foster critical thinking and enhance problem solving skills to better prepare students for future careers demanding geospatial skills in a range of fields, 3) equip students with cutting edge geospatial technology skills to collect field data, create and interpret geospatial maps, and 4) increase the number of underrepresented students applying for graduate programs and internships in geospatial-related STEM-fields. This will be accomplished by adding geospatial content to modules in existing courses, creating a GIST-focused course, developing a new undergraduate certificate in geospatial science, and implementing a GIST undergraduate research program. Through a range of planned dissemination activities, this project has the potential to affect the implementation of GIST components at a range of institutions.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: EARS | Award Amount: 286.65K | Year: 2014

Innovative use of wireless devices such as smartphones in various mobile applications has exacerbated the congestion over cellular spectrum. On the other hand, many licensed spectrum blocks are left unused. Although cognitive radios (CR) technology has emerged as an enabler for unlicensed users to opportunistically access the unused licensed spectrum, most previous works commonly assume that each user is equipped with a CR which can operate across a wide range of spectrum. This may be possible in theory, but may not be practical for light-weight devices such as cell phones. How to effectively utilize the CR technology to build more flexible networks so that even non-CR capable devices can benefit from the opportunistic access to the unused spectrum is therefore in dire need.

In this project, the PIs propose a novel cognitive mesh assisted cellular network (CMCN) and investigate: 1) the architectural design of CMCN so that unoccupied licensed spectrum can be efficiently utilized and non-cognitive cellular devices can benefit from the CR technology, 2) spectrum and energy efficient CR mesh router placement under uncertain spectrum availability, 3) how to construct a fine-grained spectrum map to facilitate efficient spectrum allocation and intelligent traffic delivery, and 4) experimental validation and implementation for the proposed design. The research outcome provides a viable solution to the spectrum congestion in cellular systems. Moreover, with this flexible architecture, telecommunication industries can be rejuvenated with new innovations, leading to further development of cellular networks with high capacity and better support of new applications such as mobile healthcare, which has significant impact on individuals lives and further provides greater opportunities for job creation and economic growth. The results of the project will be disseminated through publications and presentations. Finally, this project will actively recruit and train minority students for the future workforce and mentor junior faculty.

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