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News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A new Consumer Reports analysis of more than 1,300 hospitals finds that 56 percent of U.S. hospitals have C-section rates above the national target for low-risk births. The report also reveals startling variations in C-section rates from hospital to hospital, even those within the same zip code. The message to mothers? Your biggest risk for an unnecessary C-section may be the hospital you choose. Roughly one in three babies born in this country, or about 1.3 million children each year, are now delivered by cesarean section, the most common surgery performed in U.S. hospitals. “Research suggests that for childbirth, women pick their doctor first, not their hospital. Our goal is to get women thinking about the hospital too, since the hospital you choose can play a big role in determining your risk of a C-section,” says Doris Peter, Ph.D., director, Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center. The C-section hospital ratings – all free – are available online at CR.org/hospitalratings. In many cases, cesarean sections are absolutely necessary. But often they are not: Almost half are done in situations where babies could be delivered vaginally instead, according to research. “Most hospitals are doing far too many unnecessary C-sections and women, armed with this data, can help Consumer Reports send a message to hospitals that we want them to improve,” said Peter. Consumer Reports’ goal is two-fold: first, to make C-section rates public to help new moms make smart choices, and second, to use the ratings as a mechanism to bring high rates down and thus drive positive marketplace change. The risk of having a C-section is higher in the Northeast and South, and lower in the West and Midwest. Four states had C-section rates of 30 percent or higher: West Virginia (31 percent), Florida (31 percent), Louisiana (32 percent), and Nebraska (34 percent, where there is only one hospital reporting data). And four states had rates below 18.5 percent: South Dakota (17 percent), Idaho (17 percent), New Mexico (17 percent), and Minnesota (18 percent). The national benchmark set by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is 23.9 percent or less. The variation among individual hospitals is even more dramatic. For large hospitals, C- section rates range from 7 percent at Crouse Hospital in Syracuse, New York, to 51 percent at South Miami Hospital in Miami, Florida. And just outside of Miami, Hialeah Hospital had the highest C-section rate (65 percent) of all hospitals rated by Consumer Reports. Even when hospitals are located within close proximity, variations in C-Section rates can be substantial. Consumer Reports found this pattern in multiple locations including the following cities: St. Louis, Missouri; Cincinnati, Ohio; and Fort Worth, Texas. “This variation is a critical point in our analysis because there is a big, important take away for moms. You cannot afford not to know the track record of the hospital where you’re delivering,” says Peter. Furthermore, in a recent study in the journal Birth, more than half of women said they would travel 20 miles farther to have their baby at a hospital with a C-section rate that was 20 percentage points lower. Some hospitals aren’t making it easy for women to know their C-section rates, Peter said. Consumer Reports does not have data for more than half of the estimated 3,000 hospitals that deliver babies because hospitals aren’t required to report that information to the public. “We applaud those hospitals who do share their C-section data, particularly the ones who do poorly. We see this as a critical step in the direction toward greater transparency and openness,” says Peter. Most worrisome are the hospitals that perform more than 5,000 births every year and do not publicly report their data, of which there are 28. Consumer Reports contacted the three hospitals with the most births and to date, only one, Memorial Hermann Greater Heights Hospital, responded. New York- Presbyterian Hospital in New York City and Northside Hospital in Atlanta did not respond to requests for comment. The following states had more than two of these large non-reporting hospitals: Florida, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and Texas. New York has a total of eight non-reporting hospitals, most of which are located in New York City: Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park; Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn; Mount Sinai Hospital, NYC; Mount Sinai St. Lukes – Roosevelt, NYC; New York Methodist, Brooklyn; New York- Presbyterian Hospital, NYC; North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset; NYU Langone Medical Center, NYC. Overall, there were 216 hospitals with C-section rates above 33.3 percent for low-risk deliveries, earning CR’s worst rating. Of these hospitals, the 22 listed below were the ones that delivered the most babies within a year. Conversely, there were 203 hospitals with rates of 18.4 percent or lower, earning CR’s best rating. Twenty- two of them were hospitals that delivered a high volume of babies. South Miami Hospital, Miami, Fla     51 Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY     44 Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ     43 Woman’s Hospital of Texas, Houston, TX     41 Midland Memorial Hospital, Midland, TX     40 Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, VA     39 Las Palmas Medical Center, El Paso, TX     39 Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, Plano, TX     39 Memorial Regional Hospital, Hollywood, FL     38 Henrico Doctors’ Hospital, Richmond, VA     37 Doctor’s Hospital at Renaissance, Edinburg, TX     37 Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, FL     37 Riverside Community Hospital, Riverside, CA     36 Bayshore Medical Center, Pasadena, TX     35 Jackson Health System, Miami, FL     35 Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, FL     34 St. Joseph’s Healthcare System, Paterson, NJ     34 Medical Center at Bowling Green, Bowling Green, KY     34 Baylor All Saints Medical Center at Fort Worth, Fort Worth, TX     34 Wesley Medical Center, Wichita, KS     34 Inova Alexandria Hospital, Alexandria, VA     34 Baptist Medical Center, San Antonio, TX     34 About Consumer Reports Consumer Reports is an independent, nonprofit organization that works side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world. For 80 years, CR has provided evidence-based product testing and ratings, rigorous research, hard-hitting investigative journalism, public education, and steadfast policy action on behalf of consumers’ interests. Unconstrained by advertising or other commercial influences, CR has exposed landmark public health and safety issues and strives to be a catalyst for pro-consumer changes in the marketplace. From championing responsible auto safety standards, to winning food and water protections, to enhancing healthcare quality, to fighting back against predatory lenders in the financial markets, Consumer Reports has always been on the front lines, raising the voices of consumers. __________ MAY 2017 © 201​7​ Consumer Reports. The material above is intended for legitimate news entities only; it may not be used for advertising or promotional purposes. Consumer Reports® is an expert, independent, nonprofit organization whose mission is to work side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world. We accept no advertising and pay for all the products we test. We are not beholden to any commercial interest. Our income is derived from the sale of Consumer Reports® magazine, ConsumerReports.org® and our other publications and information products, services, fees, and noncommercial contributions and grants. Our Ratings and reports are intended solely for the use of our readers. Neither the Ratings nor the reports may be used in advertising or for any other commercial purpose without our prior written permission. Consumer Reports will take all steps open to it to prevent unauthorized commercial use of its content and trademarks.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Damaging tangles of the protein tau dot the brains of people with Alzheimer's and many other neurodegenerative diseases, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which plagues professional boxers and football players. Such tau-based diseases can lead to memory loss, confusion and, in some, aggressive behavior. But there is no easy way to determine whether people's symptoms are linked to tau tangles in their brains. Now, however, a team led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found a way to measure tau levels in the blood. The method accurately reflects levels of tau in the brain that are of interest to scientists because they correlate with neurological damage. The study, in mice and a small group of people, could be the first step toward a noninvasive test for tau. While further evaluation in people is necessary, such a test potentially could be used to quickly screen for tau-based diseases, monitor disease progression and measure the effectiveness of treatments designed to target tau. The research is published April 19 in Science Translational Medicine. "We showed that you can measure tau in the blood, and it provides insight into the status of tau in the fluid surrounding cells in brain," said senior author David Holtzman, MD, the Andrew B. and Gretchen P. Jones Professor and head of the Department of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Tau is a normal brain protein involved in maintaining the structure of neurons. But when tau forms tangles, it damages and kills nearby neurons. "People with tau diseases have a wide range of symptoms because basically, wherever tau is aggregating, those parts of the brain are degenerating," Holtzman said. "So if it's in a memory area, you get memory problems. If it's in a motor area, you get problems with movement." A blood-based screening test, likely years away, would be a relatively easy way to identify people whose symptoms may be due to problems with tau, without subjecting them to potentially invasive, expensive or complicated tests. "We have no test that accurately reflects the status of tau in the brain that is quick and easy for patients," Holtzman said. "There are brain scans to measure tau tangles, but they are not approved for use with patients yet. Tau levels can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord, but in order to get to that fluid, you have to do a spinal tap, which is invasive." In the brain, most tau proteins are inside cells, some are in tangles, and the remainder float in the fluid between cells. Such fluid constantly is being washed out of the brain into the blood, and tau comes with it. However, the protein is cleared from the blood almost as soon as it gets there, so the levels, while detectable, typically remain very low. Holtzman, postdoctoral researcher Kiran Yanamandra, PhD, and MD/PhD student Tirth Patel, along with colleagues from C2N Diagnostics, AbbVie, the University of California, San Francisco, and Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, reasoned that if they could keep tau in the blood longer, the protein would accumulate to measurable levels. Allowing the protein to accumulate before measuring its levels would magnify - but not distort - differences between individuals, in the same way that enlarging a picture of a grain of sand alongside a grain of rice does not change the relative size of the two, but does make it easier to measure the difference between them. The researchers injected a known amount of tau protein directly into the veins of mice and monitored how quickly the protein disappeared from the blood. The researchers showed that half the protein normally disappears in less than nine minutes. When they added an antibody that binds to tau, the half-life of tau was extended to 24 hours. The antibody was developed in the laboratories of Holtzman and Marc Diamond, MD, of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and is currently licensed to C2N Diagnostics, which is collaborating with the pharmaceutical company AbbVie in developing the technology. To determine whether the antibody could amplify tau levels in an animal's blood high enough to be measured easily, they injected the antibody into mice. Within two days, tau levels in the mice's blood went up into the easily detectable range. The antibody acted like a magnifying glass, amplifying tau levels so that differences between individuals could be seen more easily. Tau levels in people's blood also rose dramatically in the presence of the antibody. The researchers administered the antibody to four people with a tau disease known as progressive supranuclear palsy. Their blood levels of tau rose 50- to 100-fold within 48 hours. "It's like a stress test," Holtzman said. "We appear to be bringing out the ability to see what's coming from the brain because the antibody amplifies differences by prolonging the time the protein stays in the blood." Measuring tau levels in the blood is only useful if it reflects tau levels in the brain, where the protein does its damage, the researchers said. Both high and low levels of tau in the fluid that surrounds the brain could be a danger sign. Alzheimer's and chronic traumatic encephalopathy both are associated with high levels of soluble tau, whereas progressive supranuclear palsy and other genetic tau diseases are thought to be associated with low levels. To see whether elevated brain tau is reflected in the blood, the researchers treated mice with a chemical that injures neurons. The chemical causes tau to be released from the dying neurons, thereby raising tau levels in the fluid surrounding the cells. The scientists saw a corresponding increase of tau in the blood in the presence of the anti-tau antibody. To lower tau levels, the researchers turned to genetically modified mice that, as they age, have less and less tau floating in their cerebrospinal fluid. Such mice at 9 months old had significantly lower tau levels in their blood than 3-month-old mice with the same genetic modification, again demonstrating the antibody's ability to reflect levels of tau in the brain. "It will be helpful in future studies to see if the measurement of tau in the blood following antibody treatment in humans reflects the state of tau in the brain," Holtzman said.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Damaging tangles of the protein tau dot the brains of people with Alzheimer’s and many other neurodegenerative diseases, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which plagues professional boxers and football players. Such tau-based diseases can lead to memory loss, confusion and, in some, aggressive behavior. But there is no easy way to determine whether people’s symptoms are linked to tau tangles in their brains. Now, however, a team led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found a way to measure tau levels in the blood. The method accurately reflects levels of tau in the brain that are of interest to scientists because they correlate with neurological damage. The study, in mice and a small group of people, could be the first step toward a noninvasive test for tau. While further evaluation in people is necessary, such a test potentially could be used to quickly screen for tau-based diseases, monitor disease progression and measure the effectiveness of treatments designed to target tau. The research is published April 19 in Science Translational Medicine. “We showed that you can measure tau in the blood, and it provides insight into the status of tau in the fluid surrounding cells in the brain,” said senior author David Holtzman, M.D., the Andrew B. and Gretchen P. Jones Professor and head of the Department of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Tau is a normal brain protein involved in maintaining the structure of neurons. But when tau forms tangles, it damages and kills nearby neurons. “People with tau diseases have a wide range of symptoms because basically, wherever tau is aggregating, those parts of the brain are degenerating,” Holtzman said. “So if it’s in a memory area, you get memory problems. If it’s in a motor area, you get problems with movement.” A blood-based screening test, likely years away, would be a relatively easy way to identify people whose symptoms may be due to problems with tau, without subjecting them to potentially invasive, expensive or complicated tests. “We have no test that accurately reflects the status of tau in the brain that is quick and easy for patients,” Holtzman said. “There are brain scans to measure tau tangles, but they are not approved for use with patients yet. Tau levels can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord, but in order to get to that fluid, you have to do a spinal tap, which is invasive.” In the brain, most tau proteins are inside cells, some are in tangles, and the remainder float in the fluid between cells. Such fluid constantly is being washed out of the brain into the blood, and tau comes with it. However, the protein is cleared from the blood almost as soon as it gets there, so the levels, while detectable, typically remain very low. Holtzman, postdoctoral researcher Kiran Yanamandra, Ph.D., and M.D./Ph.D. student Tirth Patel, along with colleagues from C2N Diagnostics, AbbVie, the University of California, San Francisco, and Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, reasoned that if they could keep tau in the blood longer, the protein would accumulate to measurable levels. Allowing the protein to accumulate before measuring its levels would magnify – but not distort – differences between individuals, in the same way that enlarging a picture of a grain of sand alongside a grain of rice does not change the relative size of the two, but does make it easier to measure the difference between them. The researchers injected a known amount of tau protein directly into the veins of mice and monitored how quickly the protein disappeared from the blood. The researchers showed that half the protein normally disappears in less than nine minutes. When they added an antibody that binds to tau, the half-life of tau was extended to 24 hours. The antibody was developed in the laboratories of Holtzman and Marc Diamond, M.D., of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and is currently licensed to C2N Diagnostics, which is collaborating with the pharmaceutical company AbbVie in developing the technology. To determine whether the antibody could amplify tau levels in an animal’s blood high enough to be measured easily, they injected the antibody into mice. Within two days, tau levels in the mice’s blood went up into the easily detectable range. The antibody acted like a magnifying glass, amplifying tau levels so that differences between individuals could be seen more easily. Tau levels in people’s blood also rose dramatically in the presence of the antibody. The researchers administered the antibody to four people with a tau disease known as progressive supranuclear palsy. Their blood levels of tau rose 50- to 100-fold within 48 hours. “It’s like a stress test,” Holtzman said. “We appear to be bringing out the ability to see what’s coming from the brain because the antibody amplifies differences by prolonging the time the protein stays in the blood.” Measuring tau levels in the blood is only useful if it reflects tau levels in the brain, where the protein does its damage, the researchers said. Both high and low levels of tau in the fluid that surrounds the brain could be a danger sign. Alzheimer’s and chronic traumatic encephalopathy both are associated with high levels of soluble tau, whereas progressive supranuclear palsy and other genetic tau diseases are thought to be associated with low levels. To see whether elevated brain tau is reflected in the blood, the researchers treated mice with a chemical that injures neurons. The chemical causes tau to be released from the dying neurons, thereby raising tau levels in the fluid surrounding the cells. The scientists saw a corresponding increase of tau in the blood in the presence of the anti-tau antibody. To lower tau levels, the researchers turned to genetically modified mice that, as they age, have less and less tau floating in their cerebrospinal fluid. Such mice at 9 months old had significantly lower tau levels in their blood than 3-month-old mice with the same genetic modification, again demonstrating the antibody’s ability to reflect levels of tau in the brain. “It will be helpful in future studies to see if the measurement of tau in the blood following antibody treatment in humans reflects the state of tau in the brain,” Holtzman said.


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Damaging tangles of the protein tau dot the brains of people with Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which plagues professional boxers and football players. Now, however, scientists have found a way to measure tau levels in the blood. Tau-based diseases can lead to memory loss, confusion, and, in some cases, aggressive behavior. But researchers had no easy way to determine whether people’s symptoms are linked to tau tangles in their brains. “…basically, wherever tau is aggregating, those parts of the brain are degenerating.” The new method accurately reflects levels of tau in the brain that correlate with neurological damage. The study, in mice and a small group of people, could be the first step toward a noninvasive test for tau. While further evaluation in people is necessary, such a test potentially could be used to quickly screen for tau-based diseases, monitor disease progression, and measure the effectiveness of treatments designed to target tau. “We showed that you can measure tau in the blood, and it provides insight into the status of tau in the fluid surrounding cells in the brain,” says David Holtzman, professor and head of the neurology department at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and senior author of the study in Science Translational Medicine. Tau is a normal brain protein involved in maintaining the structure of neurons. But when tau forms tangles, it damages and kills nearby neurons. “People with tau diseases have a wide range of symptoms because basically, wherever tau is aggregating, those parts of the brain are degenerating,” Holtzman says. “So if it’s in a memory area, you get memory problems. If it’s in a motor area, you get problems with movement.” Hear Holtzman explain the findings: document.createElement('audio'); https://www.futurity.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Tau-antibody-.mp3 A blood-based screening test, likely years away, would be a relatively easy way to identify people whose symptoms may be due to problems with tau, without subjecting them to potentially invasive, expensive or complicated tests. “We have no test that accurately reflects the status of tau in the brain that is quick and easy for patients,” Holtzman says. “There are brain scans to measure tau tangles, but they are not approved for use with patients yet. Tau levels can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord, but in order to get to that fluid, you have to do a spinal tap, which is invasive.” In the brain, most tau proteins are inside cells, some are in tangles, and the remainder float in the fluid between cells. Such fluid constantly is being washed out of the brain into the blood, and tau comes with it. However, the protein is cleared from the blood almost as soon as it gets there, so the levels, while detectable, typically remain very low. Long half-life Researchers reasoned that if they could keep tau in the blood longer, the protein would accumulate to measurable levels. Allowing the protein to accumulate before measuring its levels would magnify—but not distort—differences between individuals, in the same way that enlarging a picture of a grain of sand alongside a grain of rice does not change the relative size of the two, but does make it easier to measure the difference between them. Toxic ‘garbage day’ might explain how Alzheimer’s spreads The researchers injected a known amount of tau protein directly into the veins of mice and monitored how quickly the protein disappeared from the blood. Half the protein normally disappears in less than nine minutes. When they added an antibody that binds to tau, the half-life of tau was extended to 24 hours. Like a magnifying glass To determine whether the antibody could amplify tau levels in an animal’s blood high enough to be measured easily, they injected the antibody into mice. Within two days, tau levels in the mice’s blood went up into the easily detectable range. The antibody acted like a magnifying glass, amplifying tau levels so that differences between individuals could be seen more easily. Alzheimer’s toxin ‘stacks up’ to get into cells Tau levels in people’s blood also rose dramatically in the presence of the antibody. The researchers administered the antibody to four people with a tau disease known as progressive supranuclear palsy. Their blood levels of tau rose 50- to 100-fold within 48 hours. Both high and low levels of tau in the fluid that surrounds the brain can be a danger sign. “It’s like a stress test,” Holtzman says. “We appear to be bringing out the ability to see what’s coming from the brain because the antibody amplifies differences by prolonging the time the protein stays in the blood.” Measuring tau levels in the blood is only useful if it reflects tau levels in the brain, where the protein does its damage, the researchers say. Both high and low levels of tau in the fluid that surrounds the brain could be a danger sign. Alzheimer’s and chronic traumatic encephalopathy both are associated with high levels of soluble tau, whereas progressive supranuclear palsy and other genetic tau diseases are thought to be associated with low levels. To see whether elevated brain tau is reflected in the blood, mice were treated with a chemical that injures neurons. The chemical causes tau to be released from the dying neurons, resulting in a rise in tau levels in the fluid surrounding the cells. The scientists saw a corresponding increase of tau in the blood in the presence of the anti-tau antibody. To lower tau levels, researchers turned to genetically modified mice that, as they age, have less and less tau floating in their cerebrospinal fluid. Such mice at 9 months old had significantly lower tau levels in their blood than 3-month-old mice with the same genetic modification, again demonstrating the antibody’s ability to reflect levels of tau in the brain. “It will be helpful in future studies to see if the measurement of tau in the blood following antibody treatment in humans reflects the state of tau in the brain,” Holtzman says. Additional researchers from Washington University in St. Louis, C2N Diagnostics, AbbVie, the University of California, San Francisco, and Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital are coauthors of the work. Holtzman and other authors developed the antibody used in this study and are inventors on a submitted patent licensed by Washington University to C2N Diagnostics LLC. This patent subsequently was licensed to AbbVie. The National Institutes of Health and C2N Diagnostics, the Tau Consortium, and the JPB Foundation funded the research. Source: Washington University in St. Louis The post Antibody magnifies tau for potential Alzheimer’s test appeared first on Futurity.


Guarascio A.J.,Duquesne University | Faust A.C.,Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital | Sheperd L.,Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital | O'Donnell L.A.,Duquesne University
Annals of Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2015

Ebola virus disease (EVD) poses significant clinical care implications for pharmacists. Emergency preparedness efforts should be undertaken to ensure vital response to EVD. Pharmacists should consider factors such as enhanced use of resources for front-line EVD patient care along with procurement of investigational medications. Appropriate and timely preparation, distribution, and administration of treatment for patients with EVD in the setting of substantial critical illness as well as infection control measures are essential. Aggressive supportive care and early, goal-directed therapy are cornerstones of therapy, whereas investigational treatments for EVD will likely play a larger, more well-defined role as future clinical trials are conducted. © The Author(s) 2014.


ST. LOUIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--C N Diagnostics today reported results from its Phase 1 study testing ABBV-8E12 (Formerly C N-8E12) in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). ABBV-8E12 is a humanized anti-tau monoclonal antibody currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease and PSP, both progressive brain diseases currently lacking effective treatment options. Results from the first-in-human study were reported this morning as part of a Late-Breaking Oral Session at the Clinical Trials in Alzheimer’s Disease (CTAD) 2016 conference in San Diego, CA. Dr. Diana Kerwin, a key investigator to the study and Chief of Geriatrics as well as Director, Texas Alzheimer’s and Memory Disorders at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, presented the results. The presentation was entitled: “Safety, Tolerability and Pharmacokinetics of ABBV-8E12: A Humanized Anti-tau Monoclonal Antibody, in a Phase 1, Single Ascending Dose, Placebo-controlled Study in Subjects with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.” The study enrolled 30 subjects with PSP across 12 clinical sites throughout the United States. Patients were randomly assigned in a double-blinded manner to receive a one-time dose of either placebo or ABBV-8E12 at escalating doses up to 50 mg/kg. Subjects were followed out to 84 days post-dosing for safety, tolerability, and allergic reactions, as well as metabolism of the drug from the bloodstream. Study participants were, on average, 69 years of age, with 53% being males. Demographic characteristics of the patients were well balanced across the different dose groups. ABBV-8E12 was safe and well tolerated when administered intravenously in single doses of up to 50 mg/kg. No dose-limiting toxicities occurred, and adverse event frequency and severity did not vary by dose or when compared to placebo. Further, no allergic reactions occurred in any of the study participants. Metabolism and brain penetration levels of the drug were also consistent with what has previously been observed for other monoclonal antibodies. “We are extremely thankful to the patients and their family members who committed their time and energy to this study,” stated Dr. Joel Braunstein, CEO of C N Diagnostics. “The burden to patients in any Phase 1 trial is high, but the information we have gathered from this study is vitally important. This was one of the first human clinical studies to test the safety of tau passive immunotherapy in individuals with PSP. We can now use these results to design longer-term studies that will assess the therapeutic potential of ABBV-8E12 in clinical indications where misfolded tau appears to play an essential role in disease progression.” C N established a global therapeutic partnership with AbbVie, Inc during 2015. With AbbVie’s leadership, the companies will soon launch Phase 2 clinical testing of ABBV-8E12 in both Alzheimer’s Disease and PSP. C N Diagnostics, LLC (www.c2ndiagnostics.com) formed by scientific co-founders Drs. David Holtzman and Randall Bateman of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO and LifeTech Research, a technology research and venture development firm (www.lifetechresearch.com). In March 2015, C N formed a global partnership with AbbVie to develop and commercialize a portfolio of anti-tau antibodies (including ABBV-8E12) for the treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease and other neurological disorders. In July 2015, C N and AbbVie announced FDA Orphan Drug Designation of ABBV-8E12 for the treatment of PSP. Beside its therapeutic development efforts, C N is commercializing a suite of biomarker tests to enable drug discovery, clinical drug development at lower risk and cost, and early detection of debilitating neurodegenerative disorders before symptom onset. The company's products include the SILK-Aβ®, SILK-ApoE™, SISAQ-Aβ™, and SISAQ-Tau™ Assays, which rely upon stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry for the measurement of the kinetics, or in vivo metabolism, and quantitation of brain derived proteins. Beyond Alzheimer's Disease, products are in development to target Parkinson's Disease, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, traumatic brain injury, schizophrenia and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, among other conditions. For additional information, please contact info@c2ndiagnostics.com or call 1-877-C2N-DIAG (1-877-226-3424).


Radford N.B.,Cooper Clinic | DeFina L.F.,The Cooper Institute | Barlow C.E.,The Cooper Institute | Kerr A.,The Cooper Institute | And 3 more authors.
Atherosclerosis | Year: 2015

Objective: To assess the effect of cardiorespiratory fitness on the association between the initiation of statin therapy and incident diabetes. Patients and methods: In a prospective observational study, we studied 6519 generally healthy men and 2334 women with two preventive health examinations from December 15, 1998 through December 18, 2013 which included measurement of fitness levels, statin therapy, risk factors for diabetes, and incident diabetes. Results: 93 cases of incident diabetes occurred during an average follow-up of 3.0 years. After multivariable adjustment, an increased odds of incident diabetes with statin use was observed in those patients with impaired fasting glucose at baseline (odds ratio [OR]: 2.15, [95% CI:1.26 to 3.67]), but not among individuals with normal glucose levels (OR:1.85, [95% CI: 0.76 to 4.52]). Cardiorespiratory fitness attenuated but did not eliminate the increased risk of incident diabetes with statin use. Conclusion: In a population of relatively healthy patients, statin use was not associated with incident diabetes in patients with normal fasting glucose at baseline. However, it was associated with incident diabetes in those patients with impaired fasting glucose at baseline, though this risk was substantially reduced by increasing fitness. In addition, increasing cardiorespiratory fitness was inversely associated with incident diabetes whether or not a patient was treated with a statin. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Ellenbogen P.H.,Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital
Journal of the American College of Radiology | Year: 2015

Imagine the world without the ACR. Imagine that Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen had died before November 8, 1895. Imagine that Albert Soiland, MD, had not founded the ACR in 1923. What would medicine look like now? The ACR is important in many ways: advocacy and economics, education, quality and safety, clinical research, publication, leadership, and diversity. The ACR is vital to patients, radiologists, and other physicians. The ACR is unique: No other organization or group of societies could fill the void. So instead of imagining a world without the ACR, imagine a better world - one in which patients always come first, and all imaging professionals are active members of the ACR. We are the lucky ones - we can change the world. © 2015 American College of Radiology.


Nina Pham, the nurse who was infected by the deadly Ebola virus after being part of the team that treated the first person diagnosed with it in the United States, has reached a settlement over the lawsuit that she filed against the Dallas hospital where she worked. Pham was infected with Ebola after treating Thomas Duncan, who contracted the virus in Liberia. He was admitted to the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas but succumbed to the virus two weeks later. Last year, Pham said that the lawsuit against Texas Health Resources, the parent company of the hospital, was due to the absence of proper safety equipment and resources needed to handle the Ebola case, with the hospital staff not receiving proper training and instructions on what they needed to do in the situation. Pham said that all the information that was given to her for protection when Duncan was taken in, before it was confirmed that he had Ebola, were what her manager simply searched for online and printed out. The lawsuit accused the hospital of negligence and deception in how it handled having Duncan as a patient and its lack of support for its workers. There was no amount specified for the damages being sought. Lawyers for Nina Pham announced that a settlement has been reached with Texas Health Resources over the lawsuit, with the terms of the deal remaining undisclosed. The hospital, however, still denies the claims made in the lawsuit. The lawsuit said Pham was "a casualty of a hospital system's failure to prepare for a known and impending medical crisis," as it described the chaotic situation that ensued at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital once Duncan was diagnosed with Ebola. Nurses, who did not receive any formal training or guidance from supervisors were left to scramble for protective clothing that they could wear. Clear drop cloths were then taped to the ceiling and walls to put up a makeshift containment facility, with nurses needing to dispose hazardous waste themselves despite not being trained to do so. After the death of Duncan, Pham was told that she was safe from Ebola. She then spent time with her friends and family, but two days afterward, she started feeling sick. After a visit to a hospital, it was confirmed that she was infected with the virus. Fortunately, she was able to recover. The settlement with Texas Health Resources could finally be the end of a difficult chapter in Pham's life. However, the same could not be said for Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, as the World Health Organization warned earlier in the year that the African countries are still under threat from the Ebola virus. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

NASHVILLE, Tenn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Montecito Medical Real Estate, a premier owner of medical office buildings throughout the U.S., has entered into an agreement to acquire Rockwall Medical Plaza, a 20,007-square-foot medical office building and surgery center just east of Dallas, Texas. Strategically located on the campus of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital and constructed last year, Rockwall Medical Plaza is anchored by an ambulatory surgery center joint-ventured by Texas Health Resources an

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