Tyler, TX, United States
Tyler, TX, United States

College Station is a city in Brazos County, Texas, situated in East Central Texas in the heart of the Brazos Valley. It is north from both Houston and Austin. As of the 2010 census, College Station had a population of 93,857, which had increased to an estimated population of 100,050 as of July 2013. College Station and Bryan together make up the Bryan-College Station metropolitan area, the 15th largest metropolitan area in Texas with 228,660 people as of the 2010 census.College Station is home to the main campus of Texas A&M University, the flagship institution of the Texas A&M University System. The city owes both its name and existence to the university's location along a railroad. Texas A&M's triple designation as a Land-, Sea-, and Space-Grant institution reflects the broad scope of the research endeavors it brings to the city, with ongoing projects funded by agencies such as NASA, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research.Due largely to the presence of Texas A&M University, College Station was named by Money magazine in 2006 as the most educated city in Texas, and the 11th most educated city in the United States. Wikipedia.


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In an embodiment receiving input data over a computer network. The method also includes automatically generating topic-based metadata of the input data in relation to a multi-level taxonomy. The method also includes automatically determining parts of speech of tokens of the input data. The method also includes searching a metadata store using the tokens and the parts of speech, the searching including identifying, at a first level and a second level of the multi-level taxonomy, nodes that include metadata which sufficiently match the tokens and the parts of speech of the tokens, where the searching yields best-match grammar-based metadata. The method of also includes revising the best-match grammar-based metadata based at least in part on the automatically generated topic-based metadata.


In cattle, base color is assumed to depend on the enzymatic activity specified by the MC1R locus, i.e. the extension locus, with alleles coding for black (E(D)), red (e), and wild-type (E+). In most mammals, these alleles are presumed to follow the dominance model of E(D) > E+ > e, although exceptions are found. In Bos indicus x Bos taurus F2 cattle, some E(D)E+ heterozygotes are discordant with the dominance series for MC1R and display various degrees of red pigmentation on an otherwise predicted black background. The objective of this study was to identify loci that modify black coat color in these individuals. Reddening was classified with a subjective scoring system. Interval analyses identified chromosome-wide suggestive (P < 0.05) and significant (P < 0.01) QTL on bovine chromosomes (BTA) 4 and 5, although these were not confirmed using single-marker association or Bayesian methods. Evidence of a major locus (F = 114.61) that affects reddening was detected between 60 and 73 Mb on BTA 6 (Btau4.0 build), and at 72 Mb by single-marker association and Bayesian methods. The posterior mean of the genetic variance for this region accounted for 43.75% of the genetic variation in reddening. This region coincided with a cluster of tyrosine kinase receptor genes (PDGFRA, KIT and KDR). Fitting SNP haplotypes for a 1 Mb interval that contained all three genes and centered on KIT accounted for the majority of the variation attributed to this major locus, which suggests that one of these genes or associated regulatory elements, is responsible for the majority of variation in degree of reddening. Recombinants in a 5 Mb region surrounding the cluster of tyrosine kinase receptor genes implicated PDGFRA as the strongest positional candidate gene. A higher density marker panel and functional analyses will be required to validate the role of PDGFRA or other regulatory variants and their interaction with MC1R for the modification of black coat color in Bos indicus influenced cattle.


Sridharan S.,Texas College
BMC genomics | Year: 2012

Oxidative stress is a consequence of normal and abnormal cellular metabolism and is linked to the development of human diseases. The effective functioning of the pathway responding to oxidative stress protects the cellular DNA against oxidative damage; conversely the failure of the oxidative stress response mechanism can induce aberrant cellular behavior leading to diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders and cancer. Thus, understanding the normal signaling present in oxidative stress response pathways and determining possible signaling alterations leading to disease could provide us with useful pointers for therapeutic purposes. Using knowledge of oxidative stress response pathways from the literature, we developed a Boolean network model whose simulated behavior is consistent with earlier experimental observations from the literature. Concatenating the oxidative stress response pathways with the PI3-Kinase-Akt pathway, the oxidative stress is linked to the phenotype of apoptosis, once again through a Boolean network model. Furthermore, we present an approach for pinpointing possible fault locations by using temporal variations in the oxidative stress input and observing the resulting deviations in the apoptotic signature from the normally predicted pathway. Such an approach could potentially form the basis for designing more effective combination therapies against complex diseases such as cancer. In this paper, we have developed a Boolean network model for the oxidative stress response. This model was developed based on pathway information from the current literature pertaining to oxidative stress. Where applicable, the behaviour predicted by the model is in agreement with experimental observations from the published literature. We have also linked the oxidative stress response to the phenomenon of apoptosis via the PI3k/Akt pathway. It is our hope that some of the additional predictions here, such as those pertaining to the oscillatory behaviour of certain genes in the presence of oxidative stress, will be experimentally validated in the near future. Of course, it should be pointed out that the theoretical procedure presented here for pinpointing fault locations in a biological network with feedback will need to be further simplified before it can be even considered for practical biological validation.


Recent data demonstrated that MSCs can be activated by proinflammatory signals to introduce two negative feedback loops into the generic pathway of inflammation. In one loop, the activated MSCs secrete PGE2 that drives resident macrophages with an M1 proinflammatory phe-notype toward an M2 anti-inflammatory phenotype. In the second loop, the activated MSCs secrete TSG-6 that interacts with CD44 on resident macrophages to decrease TLR2/NFκ-B signaling and thereby decrease the secretion of proinflammatory mediators of inflammation. The PGE2 and TSG-6 negative feedback loops allow MSCs to serve as regulators of the very early phases of inflammation. These and many related observations suggest that the MSC-like cells found in most tissues may be part of the pantheon of cells that protect us from foreign invaders, tissue injury, and aging. © AlphaMed Press.


BACKGROUND: Karenia brevis is a harmful algal species that blooms in the Gulf of Mexico and produces brevetoxins that cause neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. Elevated brevetoxin levels in K. brevis cells have been measured during laboratory hypo-osmotic stress treatments. To investigate mechanisms underlying K. brevis osmoacclimation and osmoregulation and establish a valuable resource for gene discovery, we assembled reference transcriptomes for three clones: Wilson-CCFWC268, SP3, and SP1 (a low-toxin producing variant). K. brevis transcriptomes were annotated with gene ontology terms and searched for putative transmembrane proteins that may elucidate cellular responses to hypo-osmotic stress. An analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms among clones was used to characterize genetic divergence.RESULTS: K. brevis reference transcriptomes were assembled with 58.5 (Wilson), 78.0 (SP1), and 51.4 million (SP3) paired reads. Transcriptomes contained 86,580 (Wilson), 93,668 (SP1), and 84,309 (SP3) predicted transcripts. Approximately 40% of the transcripts were homologous to proteins in the BLAST nr database with an E value ≤ 1.00E-6. Greater than 80% of the highly conserved CEGMA core eukaryotic genes were identified in each transcriptome, which supports assembly completeness. Seven putative voltage-gated Na+ or Ca2+ channels, two aquaporin-like proteins, and twelve putative VATPase subunits were discovered in all clones using multiple bioinformatics approaches. Furthermore, 45% (Wilson) and 43% (SP1 and SP3) of the K. brevis putative peptides > 100 amino acids long produced significant hits to a sequence in the NCBI nr protein database. Of these, 77% (Wilson and SP1) and 73% (SP3) were successfully assigned gene ontology functional terms. The predicted single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies between clones were 0.0028 (Wilson to SP1), 0.0030 (Wilson to SP3), and 0.0028 (SP1 to SP3).CONCLUSIONS: The K. brevis transcriptomes assembled here provide a foundational resource for gene discovery and future RNA-seq experiments. The identification of ion channels, VATPases, and aquaporins in all three transcriptomes indicates that K. brevis regulates cellular ion and water concentrations via transmembrane proteins. Additionally, > 40,000 unannotated loci may include potentially novel K. brevis genes. Ultimately, the SNPs identified among the three ecologically diverse clones with different toxin profiles may help to elucidate variations in K. brevis brevetoxin production.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ADVANCED TECH EDUCATION PROG | Award Amount: 259.87K | Year: 2012

The need for automotive technicians who can service alternative-fuel vehicles is increasing rapidly due to technological advance. Automotive manufacturers are now offering diesel and compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles. The training on this type of vehicles in community and technical colleges, however, is lagging behind the industry. Many new automotive graduates from these colleges hired by dealerships and independent shops must be sent to extensive manufacturer training to service diesel and other alternative-fuel vehicles. To change this situation, Texas State Technical College Waco (TSTC), working with partners from industry, other higher education institutions and high schools, is developing a new Advanced Technical Certificate in Advanced Vehicle System, focusing on light-duty diesel, CNG and hybrid vehicles. The project involves skill analysis, curriculum development, lab equipment identification and acquisition, and curriculum implementation and refinement. The curriculum developed will be submitted to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board for inclusion in the states Workforce Course Manual.

The course and laboratory materials develop by the project can be adopted by other institutions, spurring the training of automotive technicians in alternative-fuel technologies in two-year schools nationwide, and addressing the unmet demand for this type of automotive technicians. To facilitate this effort, the project will hold a conference that will invite other community colleges to the TSTC Waco campus to learn the curriculum.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Lone Star Handicap Vans, LLC has big news for the conversion van industry that won't appear on the floor of this year’s NMEDA event. Patented advances in Promaster conversion cuts for personal and commercial use, expanded selections of new and pre-owned Caravan and Town & Country models and the appointment of new marketing and sales management personnel are among the many major moves the firm has recently made. Recently appointed VP of Marketing and Sales, Wayne Taylor explains, "While we regret not being able to attend this year’s event, we're excited about new patented design developments and enhanced safety features we're integrating into our entire line-up. A choice in floor cuts, roof heights, wheelbase widths, auto/manual toggle switch power ramps and more are among the many features that won't be seen on the show floor at NMEDA this year. However, they're ready to be seen on our website or by contacting a Lone Star Dealer." Taylor points to Lone Star’s industry best 7-year/70,000-mile warranty on all vehicles, new or pre-owned, as proof of the company’s commitment to quality and customer. The new marketing and sales head takes particular pride in the firms ‘extra-mile’ commitment to safety. “Lone Star vehicles performed better in all crash tests than any other vehicle ever tested, original or converted. Ours is the only company to pass all tests using a single vehicle," Taylor said. Lone Star Handicap Vans, LLC has been owned and operated by Bill and Norma Neidehofer for over ten years, since the firm’s inception. Lone Star recently underwent a 65,000ft manufacturing expansion and has instituted new patented design approaches to go along with an already patented lower-floor design on their Promaster models offering extra protection against gas leaks and added seat system safety. In addition, their custom side entry design has no effect on the original computer module. Something no other manufacturer in America can claim. Taylor added, “The opportunity to spearhead a company making a total mobility commitment to the handicapped and physically disabled in so many meaningful ways is the reason I chose to get into this business in the first place. After years of developing successful sales and marketing programs for MCI Worldcom, Qwest, Global Crossing and FR Conversions I feel like I’ve finally found my home in Tyler, Texas.” Joining Taylor, also from FR Conversions, is National Sales Manager Israel Santiago. A former sergeant in the U.S. Army, after his honorable discharge Santiago pursued career opportunities combining his Level-3 B2B from FIAT Industrial (CNH) and Ford Sales Executive Certification with proven revenue driven field service techniques. Israel attended Case University and has earned a Business Management degree from Central Texas College. He’s achieved Level-5 Sales/Customer Service Training Certification from Ford Motors and Case New Holland alike. For more information about Lone Star vehicles, the company or how to become a part of its expanding national dealer network contact Israel Santiago (941) 504- 1359 IS(at)LSHVans(dot)com


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

It has long been known that community colleges have the flexibility needed to respond to the cybsersecurity workforce needs in a timely manner. Community College Cyber Summit (3CS) is the only national conference that focuses bringing community colleges up to par with the best cybersecurity resources, curricula and technologies. Beat the rush and sign up now for the early bird discount for the 3CS, which takes place June 28-30 at Prince George’s Community College and National Harbor, Maryland. “I love the support and networking opportunities you find at 3CS. There is incredible diversity: geographic, background, work and educational experience, gender, and cultural. And everyone I've met shares a passion for meeting the cybersecurity workforce and educational needs of our Nation and the global world in which we live. I am inspired!”, states Susan Svane, North Central Texas College. The 3CS brings together community college educators and leaders to exchange information on cybersecurity in all technology fields. Students also are invited to participate, as there is a pre-summit job fair on June 28 as well as a student track. This year’s theme is “Strengthening Our Cyber IQ.” Presentations and workshops will be available for community college faculty and administration interested in any of these four tracks: 1) for faculty and colleges new to cybersecurity education, 2) for experienced faculty and programs, and for those colleges aspiring to apply for recognition as a Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense – Two Year (CAE2Y), 3) for teaching cybersecurity across the curriculum and throughout the nation’s critical infrastructure, and 4) for students attending the 3CS Pre-Summit Job Fair. Early bird registration is $150 and ends March 31. Community college faculty, administration and students are encouraged to register early due to limited seating. Register here: my3cs.org/registration-accommodations About Community College Cyber Summit: The Community College Cyber Summit (3CS) is organized and produced by the National CyberWatch Center, National Center for Systems Security and Information Assurance (CSSIA), CyberWatch West (CWW), Cyber Security Education Consortium (CSEC), Broadening Advanced Technological Education Connections (BATEC), and Advanced Cyberforensics Education (ACE) Consortium, which are all funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The outcomes of 3CS will leverage community college cybersecurity programs across the nation by introducing the latest technologies, best practices, curricula, products, and more. To learn more, visit my3CS.org.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has released its list of the Best Online Colleges in Texas for 2017. Highlighting both two- and four-year schools, more than 90 Texas colleges received accolades, with the University of Texas at Austin, Texas A&M University, University of North Texas, Texas Tech University and Baylor University coming in as the top four-year schools and St. Philip’s College, Odessa College, Del Mar College, Western Texas College and Texas State Technical College Waco ranking highest among two-year schools. “About 1.5 million students enrolled in post-secondary education in Texas in fall 2016,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “As Internet-based coursework becomes more accessible, students may find that online programs suit their needs better. Schools on our list have been ranked for overall quality, providing excellent options for anyone who wants more flexible education options.” To determine the Best Online Schools in Texas, each college in the state was evaluated using over a dozen unique data points to find which schools best meet students’ needs, including graduation rates, career placement services and financial aid availability. AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org also requires each school highlighted on the lists to carry institutional accreditation and hold public or private not-for-profit status. Find each school’s score and ranking or read more about the data and methodology used to determine the lists here: The Best Four-Year Online Schools in Texas for 2017 include the following: Abilene Christian University Angelo State University Baylor University Concordia University-Texas Dallas Baptist University Dallas Christian College Grace School of Theology Houston Baptist University Howard Payne University Lamar University LeTourneau University Lubbock Christian University Messenger College Midwestern State University Our Lady of the Lake University Prairie View A & M University Sam Houston State University Schreiner University Southern Methodist University Southwestern Adventist University Southwestern Assemblies of God University St Mary's University Stephen F Austin State University Sul Ross State University Tarleton State University Texas A & M International University Texas A & M University-College Station Texas A & M University-Commerce Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi Texas A & M University-Kingsville Texas A & M University-Texarkana Texas Christian University Texas Southern University Texas State University Texas Tech University Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Texas Woman's University The University of Texas at Arlington The University of Texas at Austin The University of Texas at Dallas The University of Texas at El Paso The University of Texas at Tyler The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio The University of Texas of the Permian Basin The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Trinity University University of Dallas University of Houston University of Houston-Clear Lake The Best Two-Year Online Schools in Texas for 2017 include the following: Alvin Community College Amarillo College Austin Community College District Central Texas College College of the Mainland Collin College Del Mar College El Paso Community College Frank Phillips College Grayson College Houston Community College Kilgore College Lamar Institute of Technology Lamar State College-Port Arthur Lone Star College Navarro College North Central Texas College Northwest Vista College Odessa College Palo Alto College Panola College San Antonio College South Plains College St Philip's College Tarrant County College District Temple College Texas State Technical College - West Texas Texas State Technical College-Waco Trinity Valley Community College Tyler Junior College Western Texas College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


(PRLEAP.COM) LEWISVILLE, TEXAS (March 1, 2017) – First Transit has received the International Standards Organization (ISO) 9001:2015 Quality Management System (QMS) certification for its first rail operation in North America. First Transit received the ISO certification for the operation and maintenance of the Denton County Transportation Authority (DCTA) A-train commuter rail system the company began operating in October 2016 The ISO 9001:2015 addresses various aspects of quality management and contains ISO's best-known standards. The certification provides guidance and tools for companies and organizations that want to ensure that their products and services consistently meet customers' requirements and that quality is consistently delivered."This ISO certification for the DCTA rail operation is a testament to the hard work our team takes every day to ensure customer and passenger satisfaction," said Brad Thomas, president of First Transit. "ISO certification reflects our leadership to deliver consistent quality to our rail partner."To receive ISO 9001:2015 certification, First Transit was required to pass a challenging evaluation of its operation and maintenance practices conducted by an independent auditor. The ISO 9001:2015 initiative was led and managed by First Transit's Denton and regional management teams. This certification positions both First Transit and DCTA as industry leaders in the commitment to quality management and operations that will help improve the passenger experience."This certification is a great achievement for First Transit and will benefit DCTA by allowing us to make sound decisions on how to best use our funds to purchase rail equipment, potentially expand our rail service, and have the highest level of quality and efficiency to help maintain and improve our operations," said Jim Cline, DCTA President.ISO is an independent, non-governmental organization based in Geneva, Switzerland with a membership of 163 national standards bodies. Their standards ensure that products and services are safe, reliable and of good quality. ISO reviews its standards every five years to remain current in an ever-changing business environment.About First TransitFirst Transit, Inc. has 60 years of experience and is one of the largest private-sector providers of mobility solutions in North America, moving more than 350 million passengers annually. First Transit, Inc. provides operation, management and consulting for more than 300 locations in 39 states, Canada, Puerto Rico, Panama and India for transit authorities, state departments of transportation, municipalities, hospitals, universities and private companies. First Transit employs more than 19,500 dedicated transit professionals. For additional information, please visit FirstTransit.com About Denton County Transportation AuthorityFormed in 2002 and funded in 2003, the Denton County Transportation Authority has been focused on an aggressive service implementation strategy to address the mobility needs of Denton County residents. The central element of their Service Plan is the A-train, which connects with DART's Green Line at Trinity Mills in Carrollton and provides service to five stations within Denton County. In addition to the A-train, DCTA provides Connect Bus service in Denton and Lewisville, Connect Shuttle and Community On-Demand services in Highland Village, Access service, Frisco Demand-Response service, University of North Texas (UNT) and North Central Texas College (NCTC) Campus Shuttle and vanpool services. The agency carries nearly three million passengers annually system-wide. For more information about DCTA, visit www.RideDCTA.net

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