Denton, TX, United States
Denton, TX, United States

Tetra Pak is a multinational food packaging and processing company of Swedish origin with head offices in Lund, Sweden, and Lausanne, Switzerland. The company offers packaging solutions, filling machines and processing solutions for dairy, beverages, cheese, ice-cream and prepared food, including distribution tools like accumulators, cap applicators, conveyors, crate packers, film wrappers, line controllers and straw applicators.Tetra Pak was founded by Ruben Rausing and built on Erik Wallenberg's innovation, a tetrahedron-shaped plastic-coated paper carton, from which the company name was derived. In the 1960s and 1970s the development of the Tetra Brik package and the aseptic packaging technology made possible a cold chain supply, substantially facilitating distribution and storage. From the beginning of the 1950s to the mid-1990s the company was headed by the two sons of Ruben Rausing, Hans and Gad, who took the company from a family business of six employees, in 1954, to a multinational corporation. Tetra Pak is currently the largest food packaging company in the world by sales, operating in more than 170 countries and with over 23,000 employees . The company is privately owned by the family of Gad Rausing through the Swiss-based holding company Tetra Laval, which also includes the dairy farming equipment producer DeLaval and the PET bottle manufacturer Sidel. In November 2011, the Tetra Brik carton package was represented at the exhibition Hidden Heroes – The Genius of Everyday Things at the London Science Museum/Vitra Design Museum, celebrating "the miniature marvels we couldn’t live without". The aseptic packaging technology has been called the most important food packaging innovation of the 20th Century by the Institute of Food Technologists and the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences called the Tetra Pak packaging system one of Sweden’s most successful inventions of all time. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP-2010-3.1-1 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2011

Systems provide value through their ability to fulfill stakeholders needs. Inevitably, these needs evolve over time and diverge from an original systems capabilities. Thus, the system must be disposed of or periodically upgraded at substantial cost. The objective of the AMISA project is to develop a generic, quantitative methodology for architecting manufacturing lines, product systems and customer services for optimal adaptability to unforeseen changes in stakeholder needs, technology development, and government regulations. The methodology will be validated in six real-life pilot projects to provide concrete evidence that it is: 1) Generic and tailorable, 2) Scalable, 3) Usable and 4) Cost effective. AMISA will deliver a step-change in the performance of European industry, characterized by a higher reactivity to needs and more economically compatible products and services. Manufacturing systems or products/services designed for adaptability will save 20% either in cost or cycle time and increase their valuable lifespan by 25%. During manufacturing these systems will consume less energy and natural resources and produce less pollution and waste. Adaptable systems will also be more amenable to adjustments in regulatory frameworks (i.e. environmental, health, safety, etc.). The AMISA consortium is composed of four large manufacturers and two SMEs representing the Food, Machinery, Aerospace, Automotive, Communication and Optronics sectors. The consortium also includes four research centers with experience in fusing engineering and economic theories with practical applications in industry and government. Since AMISA deals with systemic issues, its expected impact is vastly wider than just the industries that are directly involved in the project. Accordingly, the project will operate within an international framework, including U.S. scientists and collaboration with relevant Intelligent Manufacturing System (IMS) projects.


News Article | April 27, 2012
Site: www.theguardian.com

Even before the financial crisis, the Occupy movement and the new era of austerity, the Sunday Times Rich List was an odd kind of fixture in the media landscape. The annual roll call of the wealthiest 1,000 individuals or families in the UK has always triggered the full range of our ambivalent responses to people with staggering amounts of money: envy, admiration, disdain, awe, and that special flavour of inverse snobbery that stems from being convinced that you've spent your life more meaningfully than the head of the Tetra Pak food-packaging empire, whatever the impact on your bank balance. Now, though, for reasons we all understand, attitudes towards the super-rich are changing: disdain is hardening into anger; ambivalence has been replaced with hostility. Despite a still-weak economy, the collective wealth of the 2011 Rich List increased by £60.2bn on the previous year, and in the 2012 list, which is published tomorrow, that divergence looks set to get larger. In the end, the Rich List is only a list, but in a climate such as today's, it inevitably acquires a certain grotesque aspect. The Rich Listers are not merely the 1%, but the 0.01%, and this fanfared celebration of their assets feels like a celebration of things that nobody feels like celebrating: bankers' bonuses, complex corporate tax-avoidance structures, the stifling grip of aristocratic family wealth. Still, in focusing on the Haves and the Have-Nots, let us not forget a third group – the people you might call the Had Once, But Then Blew It All On A Private Jet With Gold Plumbing In The Bathroom. That's a somewhat unfair way of summarising the fate of the Irish hospitality magnate Sean Quinn (in reality, the near-collapse of Anglo Irish Bank had much more to do with his being declared bankrupt). But it will serve as a general label for those featured today in Weekend magazine's inaugural Not-So-Rich-Any-More List – a selection of former plutocrats who crashed out of the list in spectacular fashion. Those featured on the list vary widely: some overreached in their business ventures; others overreached in their lavish personal lifestyles; one tried to reach over the laws against fraud. But it is striking that none was done in by circumstances wholly outside their control. Schadenfreude is not an emotion to be proud of, and in the case of the Not-So-Rich-Any-More List, it may not even be warranted: many of those here are almost certainly still vastly wealthier than you or I. (It is a testament to the times in which we live that still having a few million put aside gets you nowhere in the rankings of the rich.) And their having received a modest dose of reality does nothing at all, of course, to ameliorate structural inequalities in the economy. Still, maybe it's useful to be reminded that stratospheric wealth offers no immunity to failure, or to foolish decisions; and that the lives of the mega-rich can be as subject to precipitous ups and downs as anyone else's. If you must indulge in schadenfreude, you might as well direct it at these people. And if you find yourself feeling sorry for them instead, congratulations: you're more empathic than most people, and that's worth much more than an aeroplane bathroom with taps made of gold. Business: Construction; hospitality Rich List rating: No 12 in 2008, worth £3.73bn Sean Quinn started his career in a literal hole and ended it in a metaphorical one. In 1974, aged 26, he realised his family's 23-acre dairy farm was sitting on vast swaths of gravel and shale. With a single mechanical shovel, Quinn started digging, and all of a sudden he had a profit-making quarry. A year later, he diversified into concrete and cement, and by the early 80s he was making roof tiles. Quinn left school at 15, allegedly unable to read or write, but by 2008, with assets of £3.73bn, he was Ireland's richest man. He had shares in hotel and insurance companies, and all the while he professed a love for the simple life: for Gaelic football, for small-stake poker games on a Tuesday night, and a private jet furnished with gold. But by this year, the jet was gone and, technically, so was the small-stake poker. Following the near collapse of Anglo Irish Bank, in which he had a 25% stake, Quinn was declared bankrupt – first in Belfast and then, in January, in Dublin. Business: Property Rich List rating: No 14 in 2007, worth £3bn "Money," Simon Halabi once said, "is generated by making money, and that has really been my greatest success." They are words property tycoon Halabi may now regret, not just because they border on tautology, but because they are no longer true. Halabi was once the 14th richest businessman in Britain. Born in Syria around 50 years ago, he used inherited money to invest in British property. By 2007, he had built a property empire worth £3bn and his investments included the Shard, a soon-to-be-completed London skyscraper; the offices of bankers JP Morgan and insurers Aviva; and Mentmore Towers, the Rothschilds' one-time ancestral seat. Halabi dreamed of turning Mentmore into a six-star hotel, along with 94 Piccadilly, the crumbling former home of Lord Palmerston. His achilles heel was Esporta, a chain of health clubs he bought for £475m in 2006, but that was in administration by the end of 2007. Then the housing market collapsed, weakening demand for much of his office space, and by 2009 he was heavily in debt. Mentmore was mothballed, and work never started on the derelict 94 Piccadilly. Halabi was declared bankrupt in April 2010, and his last known address was a hotel room in Switzerland. Business: Hospitality Rich List rating: No 244 in 2010, worth £292m Andrew Davis's hotel business should really have failed a lot earlier than it did. "Davis," said fellow hotelier Peter Hauser, "did not understand how to run hotels", an argument that was underscored in 2004 when seven of the 25 properties in Davis's Von Essen hotel group were struck from the Good Hotel Guide after a series of Fawlty Towers-style bungles. Yet Von Essen kept on growing, and in the following six years Davis's personal wealth almost doubled to reach £292m. No one was that sure where his money had initially come from, or who he really was. He said he went to Gordonstoun, Prince Charles's old school, but really he went to Reigate Grammar. He claimed Von Essen was named after an aristocratic European relative, though this remains doubtful. All people could really be sure of was his charm. "A mixture of Benny Hill and Frankie Howerd: immensely entertaining and very raucous," Michael Winner once said of the hotelier. "He could sell a barrel-load of ice to an Eskimo," said Lord Roy Vaughan, who himself once sold Davis four hotels, "and the next day he'd sell him another one." But charm could get Davis only so far and in 2011, barely a year after his first – and only – appearance on the Sunday Times Rich List, Von Essen finally went into administration. Business: Pharmaceuticals Rich List rating: Joint 303rd in 1994, worth £40m Herpes was how Wensley Haydon-Baillie first hit the jackpot. In the 1980s, the City financier invested heavily in Porton International, a drugs company that claimed it was developing a cure for the disease. A cure never materialised, but interest in the company was still high enough 10 years later for Haydon-Baillie to sell it at a huge profit. He made other clever investments – a struggling engineering firm, for example, that he turned into a successful electronics manufacturer – and he made friends in high places. Prince Michael of Kent was best man at his marriage to Samantha Acland, a secretary. He also had a taste for the high life. He bought some of the largest stately homes in Europe, a collection of Spitfires and six Rolls-Royces, which he supposedly inspected every morning. All this cost too much to maintain and by 1998 Haydon-Baillie was £13m in debt, unable even to pay his television licence. Things may have picked up since: in 2006, it was reported that he had bought two of the world's largest passenger hovercraft, and he now also owns a very big yacht. Business: Property; fraud Rich List rating: Joint 76th in 1996, worth £200m "John Palmer," reported the Sunday Times Rich List in 1996, "runs a large and lucrative timeshare operation on Tenerife." In fact, it was rather more lucrative than it should have been. In 2001, it emerged that Palmer had conned more than 16,000 people into paying £30m for shares in 450 Tenerife holiday homes to which they never received access. He was jailed for eight years, released in 2005, and declared bankrupt. It was not his only brush with authority. In the 80s, Palmer – a former scrap merchant and coin dealer – was accused of melting down gold stolen during the 1983 Brink's-Mat heist. Palmer – nicknamed Goldfinger – was acquitted, but in 1991 he was separately convicted of mortgage fraud. In 2007, following a seven-year investigation, Spanish authorities imprisoned him for a series of crimes ranging from money laundering to drugs trafficking. He was never charged, was released after two years, but remains on bail. Rival crime bosses are said to have placed a £1m bounty on Palmer's head. Business: Construction Rich List rating: No 75 (in Ireland) in 2008, worth £138m John Fleming was bankrupted by an unfinished block of flats. Ironically, he built his reputation in the construction business by getting the job done. The son of a Cork fisherman, Fleming started out in the 70s building sheds and outhouses for farmers. He was soon a byword for quality, and within a decade had secured major public contracts to build new schools and water pipelines. In the late 80s, he helped build one of the biggest bypasses in Ireland, and in the 90s he began developing hotels and industrial parks. By 2008, Fleming's wealth had reached £138m and he was the 75th richest person in Ireland. He kept himself grounded. He volunteered with the local lifeboat team, and in 2007 was given a medal in recognition of his long-term service. But by then he had already overstretched himself professionally. At the height of the Irish housing bubble in 2006, Fleming paid over the odds for a residential site in Sandyford, a suburb of Dublin. The development would have housed 880 flats, but the block was only half-finished when the housing market crashed. Fleming's firm was left with debts of €1bn, his financial house came tumbling down, and he filed for bankruptcy in 2010. Business: Technology Rich List rating: Joint 227th in 1999, worth £100m When he died in 1991, newspaper baron Robert Maxwell notoriously left his seven children with nothing but debt. Eight long years passed without a Maxwell in the Rich List – and then, in 1999, two broke back in at once. Christine and Isabel Maxwell – twin sisters born in 1951 – had emigrated to California in the 70s and were now involved in the dotcom boom. They helped run McKinley, an early search engine. In 1995, McKinley was sold to their rivals Excite, with the Maxwell sisters given 850,000 shares. In 1999, Excite was bought by AtHome, an internet service provider, in what was then one of the largest internet mergers. The value of the Maxwells' shares rocketed 2,000% and gave them a windfall of £100m. But it did not last long. Like many dotcom companies, AtHome peaked at the start of the new millennium and was bankrupt by October 2001. The Maxwells were not destitute, but their stay in the Rich List lasted only two years. Isabel now runs her own communications agency and lives in New York; Christine lives in the south of France.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.63M | Year: 2011

The aims of InnHF project are to offer a multidisciplinary training in the field of risk assessment and maintenance management integrated with human factors, in tight contact with companies and universities within this consortium; to strengthen and structure initial training of researchers in system engineering at European level; to attract students to scientific careers; to provide trained researchers with the necessary skills to work in industry; and to improve career perspectives by broad skills development. The INNHF scientific main objective is thus to formalize an approach and make it possible to integrate the current and developing assessment methods recommended or required by recognized industrial standards and methodologies, with an easy to use but complete human factors and system health management approach, the following goals will be achieved: 1) Review of the applicability of most recent generation standards that are not yet fully acquired by different industries and verification of their effectiveness in safety assessment. 2) Devising a method to account qualitatively and quantitatively for the human factor in the wider applied risk assessment methodologies. Verifying how a proper account of the impact of human and organizational factors (H&OF) in the operational phase may provide a sensitive change in the results of the assessments. 3) Reviewing the methods to account qualitatively and quantitatively for maintenance effectiveness, taking also into account HOFs, verifying how a proper account of the maintenance strategy may provide a sensitive change in the results of the assessments. 4) To translate the results of the analysis performed through the novel approach in a factual design improvement initiative for new or existing plant or machinery able to provide leverage for competitive advantage (maximum availability, minimum unscheduled shutdowns of production, economic maintenance, minimum incident incident and accident).


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

This report studies Filling and Sealing Machine in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering  Norden Machinery  KHS GmbH  Aman Engineering  IMA  Payper  Marchesini Group  Vemag  Rizzolio  All-Fill  Amtec Packaging Machines  Mg2  Oliver + Batlle  Cryo Star  Effytec  Handtmann Maschinenfabrik  Krones  Tetra Pak  Weckerle  Sinoped  shenhu Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Filling and Sealing Machine in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like  North America  Europe  China  Japan  Southeast Asia  India Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into  Type I  Type II  Type III Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Filling and Sealing Machine in each application, can be divided into  Chemical  Food & Beverage  Machinery & Hardware  Medical Global Filling and Sealing Machine Market Research Report 2016  1 Filling and Sealing Machine Market Overview  1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Filling and Sealing Machine  1.2 Filling and Sealing Machine Segment by Type  1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Filling and Sealing Machine by Type in 2015  1.2.2 Type I  1.2.3 Type II  1.2.4 Type III  1.3 Filling and Sealing Machine Segment by Application  1.3.1 Filling and Sealing Machine Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015  1.3.2 Chemical  1.3.3 Food & Beverage  1.3.4 Machinery & Hardware  1.3.5 Medical  1.4 Filling and Sealing Machine Market by Region  1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Filling and Sealing Machine (2011-2021) 7 Global Filling and Sealing Machine Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis  7.1 Norden Machinery  7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.1.2 Filling and Sealing Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.1.2.1 Type I  7.1.2.2 Type II  7.1.3 Norden Machinery Filling and Sealing Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.2 KHS GmbH  7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.2.2 Filling and Sealing Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.2.2.1 Type I  7.2.2.2 Type II  7.2.3 KHS GmbH Filling and Sealing Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.3 Aman Engineering  7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.3.2 Filling and Sealing Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.3.2.1 Type I  7.3.2.2 Type II  7.3.3 Aman Engineering Filling and Sealing Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.4 IMA  7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.4.2 Filling and Sealing Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.4.2.1 Type I  7.4.2.2 Type II  7.4.3 IMA Filling and Sealing Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.5 Payper  7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.5.2 Filling and Sealing Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.5.2.1 Type I  7.5.2.2 Type II  7.5.3 Payper Filling and Sealing Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.6 Marchesini Group  7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.6.2 Filling and Sealing Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.6.2.1 Type I  7.6.2.2 Type II  7.6.3 Marchesini Group Filling and Sealing Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.7 Vemag  7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.7.2 Filling and Sealing Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.7.2.1 Type I  7.7.2.2 Type II  7.7.3 Vemag Filling and Sealing Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.8 Rizzolio  7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.8.2 Filling and Sealing Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.8.2.1 Type I  7.8.2.2 Type II  7.8.3 Rizzolio Filling and Sealing Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.9 All-Fill  7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.9.2 Filling and Sealing Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.9.2.1 Type I  7.9.2.2 Type II  7.9.3 All-Fill Filling and Sealing Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.10 Amtec Packaging Machines  7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.10.2 Filling and Sealing Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.10.2.1 Type I  7.10.2.2 Type II  7.10.3 Amtec Packaging Machines Filling and Sealing Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.11 Mg2  7.12 Oliver + Batlle  7.13 Cryo Star  7.14 Effytec  7.15 Handtmann Maschinenfabrik  7.16 Krones  7.17 Tetra Pak  7.18 Weckerle  7.19 Sinoped  7.20 shenhu


— Market Scenario In the last few decades, baby food packaging market has grown rapidly, Globally, the market for baby food has been increasing due to increasing demand for convenience products and food safety. Increase in health awareness aspects including hygiene, light weight packaging material, easy to carry and reusability is also supporting the growth of baby food packaging market. Study Objectives of Global Baby Food Packaging • In-depth analysis for individual segments and sub-segments for Global baby food packaging Market • To estimate market size by type, function and application and region • To understand the market dynamics of the market and provide market snapshot • To provide region level market analysis and future outlook for North America, Europe, Asia, and Rest of the World (ROW) and their countries • Company profiling of major players in the market and competitive landscaping • Identifying the crucial stages for developments in the value chain of baby food packaging • Supply chain analysis of the product indicating the stake of the various suppliers, both basic producers and formulators/distributors, till the end-user Key Players The key players profiled in Global Baby Food Packaging report includes- • Bericap India Pvt. Ltd. • Essel Propack Limited • Hindustan National Glass & Industries Ltd • ITC Ltd Paperboards • MeadWestvaco Corporation • Tata Tinplate Company of India (TCIL) • Tetra Pak India Pvt Ltd • Cascades Inc • FPC Flexible Packaging Corp Segments On the basis of material type, • polymer • paper • metal • glass • others On the basis sealing and handle • spout top • heat seal • patch handle • zipper top • others. On the basis application, • liquid milk • dried baby food • powder milk • others. The report gives the clear picture of current market scenario which includes historical and projected market size in terms of value, technological advancement, macro economical and governing factors in the market. The report provides details information and strategies of the top key players in the industry. The report also gives a broad study of the different market segments and regions. Key questions answered in this report • What will the market size be in 2022 and what will the growth rate be? • What are the key market trends? • What is driving this market? • What are the challenges to market growth? • Who are the key vendors in this market space? • What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors? • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors? Related Report Global Corrugated and Paperboard Boxes Market Information by Material (Paperboard, Adhesives, Inks, Waxes, and others) by Product (Corrugated & Solid fiber boxes, Set-up Paperboard boxes, Folding Paperboard boxes, and others) by Application (Durable goods, Food & beverages, Paper & Publishing, Chemicals, and others) and Region - Forecast to 2022.Know more about this report @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/corrugated-paperboard-boxes-market About Market Research Future: At Market Research Future (MRFR), we enable our customers to unravel the complexity of various industries through our Cooked Research Report (CRR), Half-Cooked Research Reports (HCRR), Raw Research Reports (3R), Continuous-Feed Research (CFR), and Market Research & Consulting Services. MRFR team have supreme objective to provide the optimum quality market research and intelligence services to our clients. Our market research studies by products, services, technologies, applications, end users, and market players for global, regional, and country level market segments, enable our clients to see more, know more, and do more, which help to answer all their most important questions. For more information, please visit https://www.marketresearchfuture.com


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME-AG | Phase: SME-2012-2 | Award Amount: 3.35M | Year: 2012

Worldwide about 7 million tonnes of coated paper, paperboard and cardboard (cartons) are currently manufactured annually mainly for food and beverage packaging. The standard coating material currently used is petrochemical-based polyethylene (PE). Typical laminate packaging contains about 20% of this material. Increased political, legislative and consumer pressure to reduce the dependency on fossil fuel based plastics poses a major challenge for packaging producers to seek sustainably sourced alternative materials that do not harm the environment in their manufacture, exhibit enhanced recyclability and offer similar performance to their conventional plastic counterparts. There is a need to provide producers of coated carton manufacturers with a bio-based material that will enable them to substitute much of the currently used PE coating without compromising the humidity barrier properties of the resulting packaging materials and overcome the current challenge to the recycling of such packaging. This project will build on past research that has revealed that Whey protein coating can replace existing plastic coatings in multilayer packaging and enhance their recyclability. A coating system will be developed based on renewable raw materials derived from agrofood waste and its technological application for extrusion coating cartons to produce packaging materials for both solid and liquid food products. The innovative coating formulations will be based on proteins from whey and potato starch. The resulting laminates will be validated for their suitability to replace the currently used synthetic plastics in a range of carton packaging materials and the improvement of the recycling process whereby the biodegradation of the extruded bio-coating will allow separating more easily the other combined layers will also be proved. Uptake of the novel bio-material will increase the sustainability and competitiveness of the EU packaging industry.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Wiseguyreports.Com Adds “Liquid Packaging Cartons -Market Demand, Growth, Opportunities and analysis of Top Key Player Forecast to 2022” To Its Research Database The Global Liquid Packaging Carton market is accounted for $15.73 billion in 2015 and is expected to reach $26.42 billion by 2022 growing at a CAGR of 7.7%. The present fast paced life has claimed demand for liquid diet, which is handy and user-friendly. The liquid packaging cartons market is much following the trend, moreover, environment friendly nature, recyclable production, better shelf life & being microbial resistant are the factors driving the market. Furthermore, demand for fuel-efficient vehicles, low carbon emitting vehicles and superior driving experience had escalated the market. However, tough competition from plastic and high cost are the factors hampering the market. Gable top carton segment is estimated to be the fastest growing segment in the market o wing to great market demand for Tetra Packs. Moreover, PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate) and HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) is trending packaging segment due to its user-friendliness and longer shelf-life, the plastic market has developed its base making it as largest market segment. The North American market for packaging is dominating the market followed by Europe in regard to high consumption of functional liquid diets and packaged diet. Asia pacific had recorded substantial growth in India and China. Some of the key players of the Liquid Packaging Carton market include Adam Pack s.a. , Comar, Inc., Elopak Inc., Evergreen Packaging Inc. , IPI s.r.l., Liqui-Box Corp., NIPPON PAPER INDUSTRIES CO., LTD, Refresco Gerber N.V., SIG Combibloc GmbH, Tetra Laval, Tetra Pak Inc., TidePak Aseptic Packaging Material Co., Ltd., Tri-Wall and Weyerhaeuser Company. Regions Covered: • North America o US o Canada o Mexico • Europe o Germany o France o Italy o UK o Spain o Rest of Europe • Asia Pacific o Japan o China o India o Australia o New Zealand o Rest of Asia Pacific • Rest of the World o Middle East o Brazil o Argentina o South Africa o Egypt What our report offers: - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments - Market share analysis of the top industry players - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/674258-liquid-packaging-cartons-global-market-outlook-2016-2022


LAUSANNE, 02-Mar-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — Tetra Pak has acquired Johnson Industries International, a company specialising in the design, development and manufacture of equipment and lines to produce mozzarella cheese. The ​company also manufactures a range of cheese cutting, shredding and brining equipment. These additions broaden Tetra Pak’s wide-ranging cheese technology portfolio and strengthen its position as a leading global provider of cheese manufacturing solutions. Based in Wisconsin, U.S., Johnson Industries International, is one of North America’s principal suppliers to the high-quality, high-volume segment of mozzarella cheese manufacturing. Monica Gimre, Executive Vice President, Processing Systems at Tetra Pak said, “The acquisition of Johnson Industries International adds essential know-how and technology in a sector of the cheese market that is growing ever-more important to our business. Many of our customers are expanding production in this category. Thanks to this acquisition, we can now ensure they have access to a complete equipment and services solution, helping minimise the complexity of plant management.” Grant Nesheim, President of Johnson Industries International, said, “This transaction means that our innovations will be supported by the global resources and leading expertise of Tetra Pak. This will benefit our customers in the long run as they continue to receive our market-leading products and services supported by Tetra Pak’s global organisation. In recent years we have been expanding our business to other parts of the world, and we now see an exciting opportunity for further international growth through Tetra Pak channels.” Johnson Industries International will remain in its current location and will continue to focus on its core business.​ About Tetra Pak Together with our customers we make food safe and available, everywhere. Since the start in 1951 we have taken pride in providing the best possible processing and packaging solutions for food. Tetra Pak is one of three companies in the Tetra Laval Group – a private group that started in Sweden. The other two companies are DeLaval and Sidel. Tetra Laval is headquartered in Switzerland.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

DENTON, Texas, Nov. 10, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- All over the world, new ideas are changing mankind's relationship with food. From the Svalbard Global Seed Vault to the "ugly food movement," ideas big and small are making an impact. To uncover such stories, Tetra Pak® has launched a new...


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: news.europawire.eu

LAUSANNE, 17-Feb-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — Tetra Pak is to build a new plant at its Rayong site in Thailand, dedicated to producing closures for carton packaging.​​​ The €24 million investment, which will create around 60 jobs when it opens early in 2018, will be capable of producing more than 3 billion closures every year. With demand for well-designed closures on beverage cartons rising all the time, the new facility will provide much-needed local production and essential extra capacity. Michael Zacka, Cluster Vice President, Tetra Pak South Asia, East Asia and Oceania (SAEA&O), said: “The new production facility will ensure faster delivery for customers across the region, offering a broad range of exciting closures that meet consumer demand for functionality and convenience.”​​​ “It’s another sign of the confidence we have in this region, and our commitment to putting our customers’ success at the heart of everything we do. Together with the packaging material factory that we will open in Vietnam in 2019, our fourth in southern Asia alone, our ability to serve customers in this exciting part of the world is growing stronger all the time.”​​​​ The new production facility will be located within the company’s existing Straws and Strips Plant in Rayong.​​​ About Tetra Pak Together with our customers we make food safe and available, everywhere. Since the start in 1951 we have taken pride in providing the best possible processing and packaging solutions for food.

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