Potomac Falls, VA, United States
Potomac Falls, VA, United States

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Metzgar D.,Naval Health Research Center | Myers C.A.,Naval Health Research Center | Russell K.L.,Naval Health Research Center | Faix D.,Naval Health Research Center | And 20 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2010

For more than four decades the cause of most type A influenza virus infections of humans has been attributed to only two viral subtypes, A/H1N1 or A/H3N2. In contrast, avian and other vertebrate species are a reservoir of type A influenza virus genome diversity, hosting strains representing at least 120 of 144 combinations of 16 viral hemagglutinin and 9 viral neuraminidase subtypes. Viral genome segment reassortments and mutations emerging within this reservoir may spawn new influenza virus strains as imminent epidemic or pandemic threats to human health and poultry production. Traditional methods to detect and differentiate influenza virus subtypes are either time-consuming and labor-intensive (culture-based) or remarkably insensitive (antibody-based). Molecular diagnostic assays based upon reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) have short assay cycle time, and high analytical sensitivity and specificity. However, none of these diagnostic tests determine viral gene nucleotide sequences to distinguish strains and variants of a detected pathogen from one specimen to the next. Decision-quality, strain- and variant-specific pathogen gene sequence information may be critical for public health, infection control, surveillance, epidemiology, or medical/veterinary treatment planning. The Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM-Flu) is a robust, highly multiplexed and target gene sequencing-based alternative to both traditional culture- or biomarker-based diagnostic tests. RPM-Flu is a single, simultaneous differential diagnostic assay for all subtype combinations of type A influenza viruses and for 30 other viral and bacterial pathogens that may cause influenza-like illness. These other pathogen targets of RPM-yFlu may co-infect and compound the morbidity and/or mortality of patients with influenza. The informative specificity of a single RPM-Flu test represents specimen-specific viral gene sequences as determinants of virus type, A/HN subtype, virulence, host-range, and resistance to antiviral agents.


Wang Z.,Center for Bio Molecular Science and Engineering | Malanoski A.P.,Center for Bio Molecular Science and Engineering | Lin B.,Center for Bio Molecular Science and Engineering | Long N.C.,Nova Research Inc. | And 10 more authors.
Microbial Ecology | Year: 2010

Military recruits experience a high incidence of febrile respiratory illness (FRI), leading to significant morbidity and lost training time. Adenoviruses, group A Streptococcus pyogenes, and influenza virus are implicated in over half of the FRI cases reported at recruit training center clinics, while the etiology of the remaining cases is unclear. In this study, we explore the carriage rates and disease associations of adenovirus, enterovirus, rhinovirus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis in military recruits using high-density resequencing microarrays. The results showed that rhinoviruses, adenoviruses, S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and N. meningitidis were widely distributed in recruits. Of these five agents, only adenovirus showed significant correlation with illness. Among the samples tested, only pathogens associated with FRI, such as adenovirus 4 and enterovirus 68, revealed strong temporal and spatial clustering of specific strains, indicating that they are transmitted primarily within sites. The results showed a strong negative association between adenoviral FRI and the presence of rhinoviruses in recruits, suggesting some form of viral interference. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Kourout M.,OBRR | Fisher C.,OBRR | Purkayastha A.,Tessarae, Llc | Tibbetts C.,Tessarae, Llc | And 4 more authors.
Transfusion | Year: 2016

BACKGROUND The implementation of nucleic acid-based tests for blood donor screening has improved the safety of the blood supply; however, the increasing number of emerging pathogen tests is burdensome. Development of multiplex testing platforms that allow simultaneous screening for different pathogens is a potential solution. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS The TessArray resequencing microarray is a platform that allows multiplex detection and identification of 97 different blood-borne pathogens in one single test. The objective was to evaluate the lowest concentration detected in blood or plasma, species discrimination, and applicability of the TessArray microarray platform for testing blood donors. Human blood or plasma spiked with selected pathogens (10,000, 1000, or 100 cells or copies/mL), including three viral, four bacterial, and four protozoan pathogens were each tested on this platform. The nucleic acids were extracted, amplified using multiplexed sets of pooled specific primers, fragmented, labeled, and hybridized to a microarray. Finally, the detected sequences were identified using an automated genomic database alignment algorithm. RESULTS The performance of this platform demonstrated detection for spiked bacterial and protozoan pathogens of 100 cells/mL and viral pathogens as low as 100 copies/mL. Coded specimens, including spiked and negative controls, were identified correctly for blood specimens (31/32, 97%) and for plasma specimens (20/22, 91%) demonstrating the effectiveness of the platform. CONCLUSION These results indicated that the TessArray microarray platform could be employed for multiplex detection and identification, with a high level of discriminatory power for numerous blood-borne pathogen targets with potential for use in blood safety. © 2016 AABB.


Abd Rahman S.,University of Queensland | Schirra H.J.,University of Queensland | Lichanska A.M.,University of Queensland | Lichanska A.M.,Tessarae, Llc | And 3 more authors.
Growth Hormone and IGF Research | Year: 2013

Objective: Growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone with important roles in growth and metabolism. The objective of this study was to investigate the metabolism of a human subject with severe GH deficiency (GHD) due to a PIT-1 gene mutation and the metabolic effects of GH therapy using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics. NMR-based metabonomics is a platform that allows the metabolic profile of biological fluids such as urine to be recorded, and any alterations in the profile modulated by GH can potentially be detected. Design: Urine samples were collected from a female subject with severe GHD before, during and after GH therapy, and from healthy age- and sex-matched controls and analysed with NMR-based metabonomics. Setting: The samples were collected at a hospital and the study was performed at a research facility. Participants: We studied a 17. year old female adolescent with severe GHD secondary to PIT-1 gene mutation who had reached final adult height and who had ceased GH therapy for over 3. years. The subject was subsequently followed for 5. years with and without GH therapy. Twelve healthy age-matched female subjects acted as control subjects. Intervention: The GH-deficient subject re-commenced GH therapy at a dose of 1. mg/day to normalise serum IGF-1 levels. Main outcome measures: Urine metabolic profiles were recorded using NMR spectroscopy and analysed with multivariate statistics to distinguish the profiles at different time points and identify significant metabolites affected by GH therapy. Results: NMR-based metabonomics revealed that the metabolic profile of the GH-deficient subject altered with GH therapy and that her profile was different from healthy controls before, and during withdrawal of GH therapy. Conclusion: This study illustrates the potential use of NMR-based metabonomics for monitoring the effects of GH therapy on metabolism by profiling the urine of GH-deficient subjects. Further controlled studies in larger numbers of GH-deficient subjects are required to determine the clinical benefits of NMR-based metabonomics in subjects receiving GH therapy. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Patent
Tessarae, Llc and The Regents Of The University Of California | Date: 2013-02-21

A robust, automated computational pipeline was used to design a system comprising a microarray for the identification of microorganisms and their antibiotic resistance profiles. This system and methods will facilitate the study of the epidemiology and microbial ecology of antibiotic resistance and be an invaluable tool to rapidly and simultaneously identify organisms and their antimicrobial resistance elements in environmental, food and clinical samples.


Tanner A.K.,Emory University | Valencia C.A.,Emory University | Rhodenizer D.,Emory University | Espirages M.,Emory University | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Molecular Diagnostics | Year: 2014

Identifying individuals as carriers of severe disease traits enables informed decision making about reproductive options. Although carrier screening has traditionally been based on ethnicity, the increasing ethnic admixture in the general population argues for the need for pan-ethnic carrier screening assays. Highly multiplexed mutation panels allow for rapid and efficient testing of hundreds of mutations concurrently. We report the development of the Pan-Ethnic Carrier Screening assay, a targeted sequencing assay for routine screening that simultaneously detects 461 common mutations in 91 different genes underlying severe, early-onset monogenic disorders. Mutation selection was aided by the use of an extensive mutation database from a clinical laboratory with expertise in newborn screening and lysosomal storage disease testing. The assay is based on the Affymetrix GeneChip microarray platform but generates genomic DNA sequence as the output. Analytical sensitivity and specificity, using genomic DNA from archived control cultures and from clinical specimens, was found to be >99% for all mutation types. This targeted sequencing assay has advantages over multiplex PCR and next-generation sequencing assays, including accuracy of mutation detection over a range of mutation types and ease of analysis and reporting of results. © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology.


PubMed | Tessarae, Llc and Emory University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of molecular diagnostics : JMD | Year: 2014

Identifying individuals as carriers of severe disease traits enables informed decision making about reproductive options. Although carrier screening has traditionally been based on ethnicity, the increasing ethnic admixture in the general population argues for the need for pan-ethnic carrier screening assays. Highly multiplexed mutation panels allow for rapid and efficient testing of hundreds of mutations concurrently. We report the development of the Pan-Ethnic Carrier Screening assay, a targeted sequencing assay for routine screening that simultaneously detects 461 common mutations in 91 different genes underlying severe, early-onset monogenic disorders. Mutation selection was aided by the use of an extensive mutation database from a clinical laboratory with expertise in newborn screening and lysosomal storage disease testing. The assay is based on the Affymetrix GeneChip microarray platform but generates genomic DNA sequence as the output. Analytical sensitivity and specificity, using genomic DNA from archived control cultures and from clinical specimens, was found to be >99% for all mutation types. This targeted sequencing assay has advantages over multiplex PCR and next-generation sequencing assays, including accuracy of mutation detection over a range of mutation types and ease of analysis and reporting of results.

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