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Gul A.,Istanbul Bakirkoy Women and Children Hospital | Gungorduk K.,Mardin Womens and Childrens Hospital | Turan I.,Istanbul Bakirkoy Women and Children Hospital | Yildirim G.,Istanbul Bakirkoy Women and Children Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Ultrasound | Year: 2013

Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a common genetic disorder, also known as DiGeorge syndrome. It occurs in approximately 1:4,000 births, and the incidence is increasing due to affected parents bearing their own affected children. We report the prenatal diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome by fluorescence in situ hybridization in twin fetuses having tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Acar K.,Izmir Tepecik Research Hospital | Aksay E.,Dokuz Eylül University | Oray D.,Izmir Medical Park Hospital | Imamolu T.,Izmir Tepecik Research Hospital | Gunay E.,Izmir Tepecik Research Hospital
Journal of Emergency Medicine | Year: 2016

Background Elbow fractures are a common injury seen among emergency department trauma patients. Despite its high frequency, there is no standardized method of diagnosis using conventional x-ray imaging for trauma patients presenting with elbow pain and restricted elbow movement. Objective We aimed to assess trauma patients, using computed tomography (CT), who present with a positive elbow extension test and have no evident fracture on x-ray study. Methods Patients presented to our emergency department with elbow trauma and were evaluated between April 2010 and March 2011. A CT scan of the injured elbow was ordered for patients with pain on elbow extension (a positive elbow extension test) and no evidence of fracture on x-ray study. All CT and x-ray images were evaluated by a designated radiologist. Results One hundred and forty-eight patients presented to our emergency department with elbow trauma. Two patients were excluded from the study, one with former motion disability and another with an open fracture. In the remaining patients, there were 32 fractures in total. Forty-three of 114 patients without fracture signs had a positive elbow extension test and 4 of these patients refused CT imaging. Fractures were found in 5 (12.8%) of the 39 patients assessed with CT. CT imaging found that two of these patients had a radial head fracture, two others had an olecranon fracture, and one patient had a coronoid fracture. Conclusions We recommend CT as an additional evaluation imaging study for trauma patients who have a positive elbow extension test and who present with no apparent fracture on x-ray imaging. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


Abdullayev R.,Adyaman University Research Hospital | Kucukebe O.B.,Adyaman University Research Hospital | Celik B.,Gazi University | Kirman N.,Izmir Tepecik Research Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Turkish Journal of Medical Sciences | Year: 2015

Background/aim: Postdural puncture backache (PDPB) is the most frequent complaint after spinal anesthesia. In the literature its importance is generally overshadowed by postdural puncture headache. We studied two different kinds of spinal anesthesia needles to compare their technical handling capacities and incidences of PDPB. Materials and methods: Data of 256 pregnant female patients undergoing cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia were collected for the study. Patients were divided into two groups as Group A (n = 109) and Group Q (n = 147) according to the spinal needle used for spinal anesthesia (i.e. 26-gauge atraumatic and 26-gauge Quincke needles, respectively). Backache incidences during a 1-week period postoperatively and handling characteristics of the needles were noted. Results: Spinal anesthesia was successfully performed at one attempt in 92.7% and 86.4% of patients in Groups A and Q, respectively. PDPB was encountered in 62.4% and 44.2% of patients in Groups A and Q, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.037). Conclusion: Both 26-gauge Atraucan and Quincke needles have excellent handling characteristics. PDPB seems to be less common with the 26-gauge Quincke needle than with the Atraucan needle. © TÜBİTAK.


PubMed | Izmir Medical Park Hospital, Izmir Tepecik Research Hospital and Dokuz Eylül University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of emergency medicine | Year: 2016

Elbow fractures are a common injury seen among emergency department trauma patients. Despite its high frequency, there is no standardized method of diagnosis using conventional x-ray imaging for trauma patients presenting with elbow pain and restricted elbow movement.We aimed to assess trauma patients, using computed tomography (CT), who present with a positive elbow extension test and have no evident fracture on x-ray study.Patients presented to our emergency department with elbow trauma and were evaluated between April 2010 and March 2011. A CT scan of the injured elbow was ordered for patients with pain on elbow extension (a positive elbow extension test) and no evidence of fracture on x-ray study. All CT and x-ray images were evaluated by a designated radiologist.One hundred and forty-eight patients presented to our emergency department with elbow trauma. Two patients were excluded from the study, one with former motion disability and another with an open fracture. In the remaining patients, there were 32 fractures in total. Forty-three of 114 patients without fracture signs had a positive elbow extension test and 4 of these patients refused CT imaging. Fractures were found in 5 (12.8%) of the 39 patients assessed with CT. CT imaging found that two of these patients had a radial head fracture, two others had an olecranon fracture, and one patient had a coronoid fracture.We recommend CT as an additional evaluation imaging study for trauma patients who have a positive elbow extension test and who present with no apparent fracture on x-ray imaging.

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