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Düsseldorf, Germany

Born C.,Tenova Re Energy GmbH | Granderath R.,Tenova Re Energy GmbH
AISTech - Iron and Steel Technology Conference Proceedings | Year: 2011

Heat recovery is the order of the day. Increasing energy prices and constantly stricter environmental regulations turn energy efficiency into a central topic for each energy intense plant, and heat recovery is a central component of each energy efficiency increase. Technology is not the issue: Tenova iRecovery is a reliable and well approved tool for all furnace operators that think about heat recovery. Despite all complaints about high energy prices the main challenge for heat recovery is reaching a sensible amortization. And this depends in the very first place on the steam demand. Power generation is not the silver bullet as one might expect; in fact all other usage should be considered first and the remaining energy be used for power generation. All this can't be done without a proper concept; especially for integrated plants that have different waste heat sources and a combination of potential heat sinks an energy survey is unavoidable. Doing such kind of survey brings a lot of typical problems and challenges; data collection, load case combination, equipment sizing and time slice problems shouldn't be underestimated. Source


Born C.,Tenova Re Energy GmbH | Granderath R.,Tenova Re Energy GmbH
AISTech - Iron and Steel Technology Conference Proceedings | Year: 2011

A standard top charged EAF will app. have 180-220 kWh/tls offgas energy content, where offgas is the central element for heat recovery. Depending on the temperature at the low end and the control of dilution air between 50-85% of this energy content can be recovered. Contradictory to a wide spread opinion heat recovery from a batch mode furnace is not an issue with Tenova iRecovery steam buffering technology; still superheated steam is an issue. But the discussion showed that in almost any case it's possible to avoid the need for superheated steam and economically better to generate power with i.e. an ORC turbine instead of using external burners for superheating. The right point in time to plan an iRecovery system is always when there is a high process steam demand, otherwise iRecovery should be taken into consideration when an existing cooling system needs revamping or a new furnace is planned. Source


Born C.,Tenova Re Energy GmbH | Granderath R.,Tenova Re Energy GmbH
AISTech - Iron and Steel Technology Conference Proceedings | Year: 2012

Heat recovery is the biggest source for improving the energy efficiency of industrial furnaces in steel and alloy plants, and steam generation with Tenova iRecovery® offers approved technology for different furnaces. The best use for steam is process use, still in many particular projects power generation for a part or all of the recovered energy is the only feasible option. Due to technical reasons the standard way of a turbine working with superheated steam is not always available: It must be carefully checked whether superheated steam is available and how long furnace operation cycles are. It's been showed that in many cases a careful planning can get a project on the track to the steam turbine, still in other cases the problems remain significant, especially in small projects. For these projects a discussion of alternative ways of power generation has shown that using ORC turbine technology is a way that combines acceptable electrical efficiency with very easy operation. AIS Tech. Source


Born C.,Tenova Re Energy GmbH | Granderath R.,Tenova Re Energy GmbH
Stahl und Eisen | Year: 2010

Approximately 30 % of the primary energy input of an electric arc furnace are lost in the off-gas, which is the biggest part of all energy losses. This article describes the iRecovery technology to recover this energy, especially targeting the reference project at Georgsmarienhütte in Germany. The result of this heat recovery is steam; it will be discussed why the question of steam usage is often more important and complex than the question of steam generation. Source


Born C.,Tenova Re Energy GmbH | Granderath R.,Tenova Re Energy GmbH
MPT Metallurgical Plant and Technology International | Year: 2013

Potential benefits and challenges involved in heat recovery in EAF steel plants are discussed on the basis techniques developed by engineers from the Tenova group to address these issues. Tenova engineers have developed a different way to address these contradictory issues. Their technique involves the off-gas energy content to be determined from the energy input via a mass and energy balance. The process engineers of Tenova Re Energy have developed an advanced mass and energy balance based on the mathematical models of Tenova Goodfellow, which allows exact conclusions to be drawn regarding the off-gas energy content of different EAFs and different melts of the respective EAFs. The results from these efforts have been compared with measurements and reverse calculations. These results allow the classification of EAFs into off-gas energy content categories by size and operation scheme. Source

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