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Arnhem, Netherlands

Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2011.7.2-1 | Award Amount: 5.25M | Year: 2012

The growing share of electricity generation from intermittent renewable energy sources as well as increasing market-based cross border flows and related physical flows are leading to rising uncertainties in transmission network operation. In the mainland central Europe synchronous area due to large installations of renewable energy generation such as wind and photovoltaic, the difference between actual physical flows and the market exchanges can be very substantial. Remedial actions were identified by previous smart grid studies within the 6th European framework program in operational risk assessment, flow control and operational flexibility measures for this area. At the same time an efficient and sustainable electricity system requires an efficient usage of existing and future transmission capacities to provide a maximum of transportation possibilities. New interconnections and devices for load flow control will be integrated in future transmission networks and will offer new operational options. Further developments of coordinated grid security tools are one of the major challenges TSOs will face in future. The methods to be applied have to take into account all technological measures to enhance flexibility of power system operations. The zonal structure of the European energy market along with the legal responsibilities of TSOs for different system areas will continue to pose increasingly complex requirements to the system operators concerning the quality and accuracy of cooperation. The proposed UMBRELLA research and demonstration project is designed for coping with these challenging issues and boundary conditions. The toolbox to be developed will enable TSOs to ensure secure grid operation also in future electricity networks with high penetration of intermittent renewables. It enables TSOs to act in a coordinated European target system where regional strategies converge to ensure the best possible use of the European electricity infrastructure.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.6.3 | Award Amount: 3.39M | Year: 2010

The EU electric power system experiences a fundamental change in the quasi-monopolistic, top-down oriented, stable, and reasonable predictable arrangements of the past. It now spans continents, has hundreds of millions consumers and hundreds of thousands of producers, from nuclear power plants to privately-owned and operated badly predictable renewables such as solar cells, wind and microturbines and operates in an increasingly liberalized market. These developments pose huge challenges for its reliable and economic operation. This proposal focuses on the real-time power imbalance in the power net, which arises as a consequence of errors in the prediction of both production and demand. As this power imbalance will increase both in size and in frequency, presents arrangements to cope with this imbalance are no longer valid. They are neither reliable nor economic anymore. This project proposes an advanced ICT and control framework for ancillary services (reserve capacity) which allows a more intelligent solution by giving consumers and producers clear, real-time financial incentives to adapt their consumption/production according to the actual needs of the power system. This design is based on a distributed control structure, enabled by a fast ICT infrastructure and advanced control theory to reliably and economically deal with the necessary ancillary services. Decisions by consumers, producers, power exchanges and TSOs can be taken locally, based on local or national preferences and regulation. Still, the embedded incentives of the proposed framework can guarantee that all these local decisions together contribute to the global objectives of the EE power net: a reliable electric energy supply at the lowest costs.\nInstead of investing in additional expensive and environment-unfriendly reserve production or storage facilities with a low utilization rate, the reliability and economy are enforced by intelligent ICT and control.


Muller H.K.,University of Groningen | Torbaghan S.S.,Technical University of Delft | Gibescu M.,Technical University of Delft | Roggenkamp M.M.,University of Groningen | And 2 more authors.
Energy Policy | Year: 2013

The expansion of offshore wind energy as well as the increase in electricity trade between the North Sea countries leads to a growing need for additional transmission capacity. Due to the predominantly remote locations of offshore wind farms, the majority of future connections will be high-voltage direct current (HVDC) connections. In order to make the construction of offshore infrastructure more efficient, the North Sea states are currently discussing the development of a common offshore grid. Although this development still stands at the very beginning, we argue in this paper that some crucial elements should be standardized from the outset; the most important one being a common voltage level. Without such standardization, the development of a European offshore grid may be suboptimal, not cost-efficient and might even be prevented from coming into existence. We examine the technical and legal issues associated with introducing a common voltage level for the use of HVDC VSC technology, and discuss the optimal standard as well as the way in which this common standard can best be achieved. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-05-2015 | Award Amount: 51.69M | Year: 2016

In order to unlock the full potential of Europes offshore resources, network infrastructure is urgently required, linking off-shore wind parks and on-shore grids in different countries. HVDC technology is envisaged but the deployment of meshed HVDC offshore grids is currently hindered by the high cost of converter technology, lack of experience with protection systems and fault clearance components and immature international regulations and financial instruments. PROMOTioN will overcome these barriers by development and demonstration of three key technologies, a regulatory and financial framework and an offshore grid deployment plan for 2020 and beyond. A first key technology is presented by Diode Rectifier offshore converter. This concept is ground breaking as it challenges the need for complex, bulky and expensive converters, reducing significantly investment and maintenance cost and increasing availability. A fully rated compact diode rectifier converter will be connected to an existing wind farm. The second key technology is an HVDC grid protection system which will be developed and demonstrated utilising multi-vendor methods within the full scale Multi-Terminal Test Environment. The multi-vendor approach will allow DC grid protection to become a plug-and-play solution. The third technology pathway will first time demonstrate performance of existing HVDC circuit breaker prototypes to provide confidence and demonstrate technology readiness of this crucial network component. The additional pathway will develop the international regulatory and financial framework, essential for funding, deployment and operation of meshed offshore HVDC grids. With 35 partners PROMOTioN is ambitious in its scope and advances crucial HVDC grid technologies from medium to high TRL. Consortium includes all major HVDC and wind turbine manufacturers, TSOs linked to the North Sea, offshore wind developers, leading academia and consulting companies.


The European electricity system is facing major challenges to implement a strategy for a reliable, competitive and sustainable electricity supply. The development and the renewal of the transmission infrastructure are central and recognised issues in this strategy. Indeed the transmission system is a complex and strongly interconnected infrastructure that offers a wide range of benefits like reliability improvement, promotion of competitive electricity markets and of economic growth, support for development of new generation and for exploitation of renewable resources. Within this context, the objective of REALISEGRID is to develop a set of criteria, metrics, methods and tools (hereinafter called framework) to assess how the transmission infrastructure should be optimally developed to support the achievement of a reliable, competitive and sustainable electricity supply in the European Union (EU). The project encompasses three main activity-packages: 1) identification of performances and costs of novel technologies aimed at increasing capacity, reliability and flexibility of the transmission infrastructure; 2) definition of long term scenarios for the EU power sector, characterized by different evolutions of demand and supply; 3) implementation of a framework to facilitate harmonisation of pan-European approaches to electricity infrastructure evolution and to evaluate the overall benefits of transmission expansion investments. The expected output of the project is fourfold: - Implementation of the framework to assess the benefits provided by transmission infrastructure development to the pan-European power system. - Preparation of a roadmap for the incorporation of new transmission technologies in the electricity networks. - Analysis of impacts of different scenarios on future electricity exchanges among European countries. - Testing and application of the framework for the cost-benefit analysis of specific transmission projects.

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