Knoxville, TN, United States
Knoxville, TN, United States

The Tennessee Valley Authority is a federally owned corporation in the United States created by congressional charter in May 1933 to provide navigation, flood control, electricity generation, fertilizer manufacturing, and economic development in the Tennessee Valley, a region particularly affected by the Great Depression. The enterprise was a result of the efforts of Senator George W. Norris of Nebraska. TVA was envisioned not only as a provider, but also as a regional economic development agency that would use federal experts and electricity to rapidly modernize the region's economy and society.TVA's service area covers most of Tennessee, portions of Alabama, Mississippi, and Kentucky, and small slices of Georgia, North Carolina, and Virginia. It was the first large regional planning agency of the federal government and remains the largest. Under the leadership of David Lilienthal , TVA became a model for America's governmental efforts to seek to assist in the modernization of agrarian societies in the developing world. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Over 100 volunteers converged at East Lake Elementary School this past Saturday morning, to help finish the installation of a brand new playground that has been the vision of school officials for the past two years. Enthusiastic employees from PlayCore, a local recreation company, and members of the Kiwanis Club of Downtown Chattanooga were joined by teachers and administrators from East Lake Elementary School, to help bring the dream of a new playground for over 650 students to reality. Determined to bridge the gap in their fundraising efforts, East Lake Elementary School was fortunate to gain assistance from multiple community partners who offered grants, services and materials, as well as labor to achieve their remaining goals. “After months of grant writing and reaching out to the local community, our fundraising efforts had finally plateaued. Thanks to the matching funds offer from Play & Park Structures, a PlayCore company, and the Kiwanis Club of Chattanooga, we were able to purchase an even larger playground than anticipated. Now our students can’t wait for their recess time, so they can all play together on this engaging new structure!” stated Mrs. Lancaster, Principal at East Lake Elementary School. Earlier in the year, the Kiwanis Club organized a Business Pentathlon event in which local companies fielded teams of four to seven employees that were combined with East Lake teachers, parents, and their children. These teams then competed in five different athletic events to determine the overall champions that would be recognized on a special sign mounted at the new playground site. Participants in this Pentathlon included Chattanooga Area Schools Federal Credit Union, Tennessee Valley Federal Credit Union, Miller and Martin, Aladdin Printing, Brock Insurance Agency, PlayCore, Collier Construction, Elliot Davis Decosimo, and Southern Champion Tray. “We hope to present this Pentathlon event on an annual basis so that we can fund new playgrounds for deserving communities every year here in the greater Chattanooga area” stated Robert Dann, Chairman of the Kommandos Committee for the Kiwanis Club of Chattanooga. Each team donated $500 to provide a team for the competition, and the overall champions were the teams from Chattanooga Area Schools Federal Credit Union and PlayCore. Mr. Robert Farnsworth, CEO of PlayCore remarked “It is so heartwarming to see the business community come out and wholeheartedly support the effort to bring healthy, physical play opportunities to underserved communities. We are excited to be a part of this new playground installation.” Several companies also provided grants for the playground equipment, including Lowe’s and the Tennessee Valley Authority. In order to prepare the site for installation, Blue Line Rentals and Tag Equipment generously provided a bobcat and 12” auger, respectively. Goodwill industries provided a large trailer to store the playground materials on site, and Sequatchie Concrete delivered the concrete materials to help secure the final phase of the playground installation. East Lake Elementary is a Title 1 school with a diverse population of just over 650 students. They are currently at 133% of their student capacity, and 100% of the children receive free lunches. The existing playground is about 12 years old, has broken parts, and only accommodates about half of the students during their recess rotation. The school was in desperate need of a larger, safer playground so that all of the students would have an opportunity to play. About PlayCore PlayCore helps build stronger communities around the world by advancing play through research, programs, and partnerships. We infuse this learning into our complete family of brands. We combine best in class planning and education programs with the most comprehensive array of recreation products available to create solutions that match the unique needs of each community we serve. About the Kiwanis Club of Chattanooga The Kiwanis Club of Chattanooga is a service organization comprised of caring men and women from all walks of life. The overarching objective is to bring aid to children in need. The majority of these efforts benefit children in the Chattanooga community. A portion of the funds raised go to help meet Kiwanis International objectives, which focus on the special needs of young children from prenatal development to age five.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Energy Management Collaborative (EMC) today announced that it was recognized for Excellence in Performance in Lighting as well as Excellence in Performance in the Southeast Tennessee District by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Preferred Partner Network (PPN) at an award luncheon held November 18 in Nashville, TN. Since its start in 2003 EMC has delivered more than 22 million kilowatt hours (kWh) to TVA customers in a variety of retail settings. This savings is also factored into the more than 2.7 billion kWh of energy savings achieved by EMC customers nationwide, a number that is expected to surpass the three billion mark in 2017. "Having skilled partners ready to help our business customers make smart energy choices is crucial to TVA's success," said Jeromy Cotten, TVA Senior Program Manager. "EMC's lighting technology expertise and their knowledge of TVA and our programs makes them an ideal partner to work with." A corporate agency of the United States, the TVA provides electricity for business customers and local power distributors serving nine million people in parts of seven southeastern states. Its PPN program has been a critical success with member partners delivering 98 percent of the TVA’s energy savings in 2016. “The strong relationships we build with our utility partners are critical to EMC’s success in delivering meaningful incentives to TVA customers,” said Katie Quam, EMC manager of customer incentives. We are pleased to be a part of the Preferred Partner Network and help customers achieve this level of energy savings and experience an immediate and positive effect on their bottom lines.” About EMC Energy Management Collaborative (EMC) provides leading-edge lighting conversion systems and service solutions in a broad range of retail, commercial, industrial and government facilities in North and South America. Since 2003, the company has used its turnkey project management approach, EnergyMAXX, to successfully implement lighting upgrade projects in all 50 states and Puerto Rico, saving clients across industries over 2.7 billion kilowatt-hours of energy.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Energy Management Collaborative (EMC) announced today its top three utility performers of 2016. The lighting and controls company, which works with hundreds of utilities nationwide, based its criteria on important factors that impact program success for customers including preapproval timelines, rebate values, payment timelines, trade ally bonuses and overall savings. Top performers included Energy Trust of Oregon Program (including Portland General Electric and Pacific Power), Duke Energy and Xcel Energy Minnesota. EMC’s vast experience with utility partners uniquely positions the company to monitor trends in the industry. Xcel Energy landed on its list of top performers for providing preapproval timelines 3-4 times faster for EMC projects than the current industry average. Duke Energy’s 2016 LED rebates encouraged customers in their territory to move forward with multiple LED projects that otherwise would not have been completed in 2016. “These benchmark factors significantly impact our customers’ project payback timelines and overall energy savings,” said John Loheit Director of Market Development. “We have great utility partners across the country, and the savings and service that these utilities offer are significant factors when our nationwide clients are choosing where to start their facility lighting upgrades.” EMC was honored by its utility partners for multiple awards in 2016 including Excellence in Performance in Lighting by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Preferred Partner Network (PPN), Highest Dollar Amount Paid for One Prescriptive Lighting Application by Duke Energy Indiana and Most Savings Achieved in 2016 from AEP Ohio. The awards reflect not just the company’s long standing relationships with its utility partners but also the significant energy savings EMC customers have recognized in these regions. “EMC continues to lead the lighting industry with our award winning incentives team,” said EMC President and CEO Jerry Johnson. “It is equally exciting for us to honor top performing utilities in the country for their joint commitment in delivering high value rebates and incentives along with bottom line savings for our customers.” About EMC Energy Management Collaborative (EMC) provides leading-edge lighting conversion systems and service solutions in a broad range of retail, commercial, industrial and government facilities in North and South America. Since 2003, the company has used its turnkey project management approach, EnergyMAXX, to successfully implement lighting upgrade projects in all 50 states and Puerto Rico, saving clients across industries over 2.7 billion kilowatt-hours of energy.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

With a fiber-optic network that provides Chattanooga residents and businesses with exceptional high-speed communications, the city’s Electric Power Board (EPB) provides the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with an ideal testbed for smart grid research. With support provided by DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE), an effort was launched in 2014 to advance the state of the power grid in Tennessee. The intent was to have Oak Ridge staff scientists, working closely with EPB, use their expertise to test new technologies, examine the use of microgrids, develop new analytics that will allow EPB to unlock the power of its smart grid data to improve operations, and use high-performance computing to perform modeling and simulations. Through their partnership, ORNL and EPB are learning how to best apply sensors, controls, secure communications, and other technologies allowing a power grid to function more autonomously and reliably as it grows and becomes more complex. This effort leverages the advancements that EPB has made in strengthening its snetwork by rolling out smart grid technologies to make its distribution system more robust and improve operations, thanks in part to $111.5 million in stimulus funds awarded by DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. That invesment has allowed EPB to provide continued reliable electric service and respond more effectively to such events.  EPB has estimated that the increased reliability is worth roughly $50 million a year to Chattanooga-area businesses and residents, and that the number of customer minutes lost to power outages has decreased by 50 percent. For instance, the deployment and integration of distributed energy resources such as renewable power sources like wind and solar brings new operational and technological challenges to utilities nationwide on many fronts, including continuing to provide secure and reliable service to their customers. The consumption of renewable energy from sources other than hydropower is estimated to have grown by 11.8 percent in 2016  and will rise another 11.1 percent in 2017, according to DOE. Utilities need to ensure the grid is protected and the power provided is consistent even when the sun doesn’t shine or the wind doesn’t blow. Now, through DOE’s Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium (GMLC), ORNL is leading eight other national laboratories to work on EPB’s next project: collecting real-time sensor data so the system immediately sees fluctuations and can balance the electrical load. Not only are new electrical system operation measurements being gathered from the sensors, but a wide range of additional parameters—from environmental to grid cybersecurity—have been developed and deployed in this living, operational laboratory. Within a proof of concept phase, ORNL has worked with EPB to install arrays of cybersecure sensors at multiple locations around the municipal utility’s 600-square-mile service territory, mostly at substations. The devices provide real-time data on everything from solar irradiance, temperature, humidity, and wind to the presence of chemicals such as methane and hydrogen. They also monitor for such inputs as vibrations,  radio frequencies, and coronal discharge, and they capture thermal images from infrared cameras trained on substation transformers. While monitoring environmental conditions, the sensors also provide physical and cybersecurity situational awareness via measuring/monitoring parameters including cell phone signals, presence of drones, sensor network cyberintrusion attempts, as well as physical intrusion detection. The additional information about the grid’s operating environment can be fed into EPB’s supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system. Utility SCADA systems provide the information to drive a utility’s grid—capturing and analyzing data such as current and line voltage and using that information to keep electricity flowing. The fiber network makes the communication of that data back to EPB’s control room nearly instantaneous. “The sensors installed so far are capturing mostly environmental conditions associated with the distribution of electricity,” said researcher Peter Fuhr of ORNL’s Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate. “We’re not measuring volts and vars or electromagnetic fields, although we could. We’re concerned with what the ambient environment is like today.” “The testing we’re doing now with these sensors will help us determine which ones make the most sense to implement on a larger scale,” said Jim Glass, EPB’s manager of smart-grid development. The sensors form a perimeter around EPB’s service area and “help us get some idea of what’s going to happen not just with our own generation but with that of others,” Glass said. For instance, some 16 megawatts of solar generation are already connected to EPB’s system, and 11.6 megawatts of that is owned by two large customers—at an automotive plant and the city’s airport. Another 4.4 megawatts come from smaller installations on primarily residential and commercial rooftops. “If we get just 15 to 30 minutes of warning about cloud cover moving in with the sensors, that will get us a better idea of what to expect out of solar generation over the next hour or so,” Glass said. With that advance knowledge, the utility can figure out how best to inject those extra megawatts into its system when it’s sunny—or if clouds are coming in, how it will handle the megawatts customers will need if solar panels aren’t producing, Fuhr explained. EPB’s fiber network “is a huge advantage to how we operate our system, and it gives scientists like those from Oak Ridge an opportunity to test their technologies,” Glass said. “There’s no radio interference to worry about. You get high speed and reliability.” Those attributes are particularly important as smart grid work increasingly relies on the Internet of Things (IoT), Fuhr noted. IoT in this case refers to network connectivity and the embedding of sensors, actuators, software, electronics, and other devices to more efficiently collect and exchange data that allows the control of electricity flows. Of particular concern to utilities is the potential for cyberintrusions presented by smart, web-connected devices. The recent denial of service attacks presented to the general internet by IoT devices such as web cameras, botnets, and even smart toasters exemplifies the need for a paradigm shift from current cybersecurity policies to a fundamentally different network and companion grid communication integration cybersecurity design, Fuhr said. Aimed at a goal of “getting the electricity grid off the internet,” ORNL researchers working side by side with EPB network and grid engineers are achieving this goal with a project underway that demonstrates the design goals in an operating utility’s electrical, communications, and data services infrastructure. Meanwhile, work on integrating renewables continues. EPB will be installing more solar capacity—1.35 megawatts worth—next summer in a pilot project at its operations center in a project with the Tennessee Valley Authority. The utility will also soon install a 100-kilowatt/400-kilowatt hour vanadium flow battery energy storage system. The battery system will allow the utility to store electricity and help balance its loads. “One thing we have really appreciated in working with the folks from Oak Ridge is understanding the implications not just of solar but of all distributed generation on our system—what kinds of things we should expect as that grows and how to deal with them,” Glass said. “We don’t have nearly the penetration of renewables like in California or Hawaii, so we don’t have the experience ourselves. That’s why it’s wonderful to have the researchers in Oak Ridge to bounce ideas off of, to ask how this will work and what they’ve seen. This will be extremely valuable, in my mind, to prepare us for down the road.” In fact, one of the first tasks ORNL undertook for the utility was a case study evaluating the economic benefit of automation technologies that have resulted in fewer and shorter power outages. The study concentrated on the grid’s performance following a major storm and found a benefit of just over $23 million for EPB’s customers, Glass said. In addition to the stationary sensor arrays, EPB and ORNL are studying how sensors installed on drones can help improve system reliability. For instance, mobile sensors can measure electromagnetic and coronal fields; detect other drones; sense for chemicals and smoke; and inspect transmission lines, structures, and other equipment more easily and safely than can standard sensors and inspection methods. “We consider drones more than just cameras. We consider them to be delivery mechanisms for a wide variety of sensors,” Fuhr said. At ORNL, research on drone applications for a wide variety of work, including grid inspection and evaluation, is performed at its Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Research Center, where Fuhr also serves as technology director. At EPB, the sensor measurements taken during a drone in flight could be seamlessly communicated to the utility’s SCADA system, providing grid operations with real-time data and visual and thermal imagery, thereby allowing them to quite literally see what the drone sees miles away. Fuhr stressed that there is a need for a fundamental improvement in cybersecurity of electricity grid systems. “It is difficult to overstate the important role of cybersecurity in the communications link between such deployed sensor systems—be they stationary in a substation or mobile on a vehicle or drone—and the core security of the embedded systems.  Electrical disruptions due to cyberattack, such as experienced in Ukraine in 2015, are a constant reminder of the need for a robust overall cybersecure infrastructure for our partner utility, EPB, as well as the thousands of other utilities nationwide that may benefit from the sensors and systems being demonstrated in Chattanooga,” Fuhr said. EPB is currently creating procedures, plans, and training before testing drones on a wider scale. “For instance, proper notification must always be given to nearby customers. We need to make sure elevation limits are obeyed and that we have a plan in place for all events,” Glass said.  “The technology and the physical activity are the easy parts.” Further out, the role sensors play on EPB’s system may widen outside grid management. For instance, irradiance sensors could provide data for other jobs and customers in areas such as outdoor lighting and security, noted Lilian Bruce, EPB director of strategic planning. Also, humidity and temperature sensors will become increasingly important in homes and businesses as building envelopes are sealed tighter, she added. The sensing and smart grid work has a foundational role at EPB, Bruce said. “It reminds me of the installation of our fiber-optic system. Once that was in place, we were able to leverage a lot of services around it. All the technologies we’re working with seem to be aligning,” she added. “They are strengthening each other’s value proposition.” “I’ve enjoyed getting to work with a lot of really smart people,” Glass said of the collaboration with ORNL. He described attending a national conference recently in which the vice president of smart-grid programs for a major utility described how “he had increased his staff in the past few years, including hiring 3 PhDs to work for his system of about 4 million customers.” Glass said he introduced himself as having “175,000 customers and 100 PhDs” working on his smart-grid issues through his connection with ORNL. Going forward EPB will continue to serve as a testbed for smart grid work with ORNL and other national labs as part of the GMLC. For the utility, the overall goal is to create a system using smart sensing, advanced metering, smart switches, customer software, and other solutions that can identify and isolate problems and automatically reroute power to reduce or avoid outages.


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

AUSTIN, TX, December 13, 2016-- William Derrickson has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.At the helm of WPD Associates, William Derrickson employs his skills as a respected manufacturing executive, consultant and expert witness in the national and international energy industries. He has utilized his expertise on a number of projects over the course of his career; notably, he was recently a consultant on a major nuclear energy issue in Finland. In the past, Mr. Derrickson served as a nuclear adviser to the Tennessee Valley Authority Board Directors. His role as president of WPD Associates entails full management of the company as well.Mr. Derrickson began honing his knowledge by earning a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from the University of Delaware in 1964. The same year, he started working as an electrical maintenance supervisor for Delmarva Power in Salisbury, Md. This was followed by positions as an instrumentation engineer for Hercules, Inc. in Wilmington, Del. and Sun Shipbuilding in Chester, Pa. Mr. Derrickson then relocated to Juno Beach, Fla., where he was a project director for Florida Power & Light Company for 14 years. He also earned a diploma from Harvard Business School.Mr. Derrickson continued to advance in his career, serving as senior vice president of Public Service Company of New Hampshire before becoming the president of New Hampshire Yankee Electric Company. His work subsequently took him to California, where he was the president and chief operating officer of Quadrex Corporation, and then chairman of the board and chief executive officer of the same company. After moving back to Florida, Mr. Derrickson was chairman of the board and CEO of the companies QES Inc. and IBEX Engineering Services. He has been based in Austin, Texas and focused on WPD Associates since 2006.An active member of his professional community, Mr. Derrickson is affiliated with the National Society of Professional Engineers, the American Nuclear Society, the Project Management Institute, and the International Platform Association, among other organizations. He has also utilized his expertise to contribute articles to professional publications. In 1984, Mr. Derrickson was named Construction Man of the Year by the Engineering News-Record (ENR) and McGraw-Hill Publications.Mr. Derrickson's accomplishments have been featured in the 26th through 37th editions of Who's Who in Finance and Business, the 44th through 70th editions of Who's Who in America, and the 1st through 9th editions of Who's Who in Science and Engineering. He has also appeared in multiple editions of Who's Who in the World and Who's Who in the South and Southwest.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López announced today the selection of Max Spiker as Senior Advisor for Hydropower and Electric Reliability Officer. Reclamation is the second largest generator of hydropower in the country; its 53 power plants annually generate an average of 40 billion kilowatt hours of electricity, enough to meet the demand of 3.5 million homes. "The availability of hydropower from Reclamation facilities is key to the stability of the electric transmission system in the Western United States and supports the development of renewable energy throughout the West," Commissioner López said. "Max’s extensive experience from all levels of power operations and management, including working collaboratively with Reclamation’s customers, stakeholders and industry, will be a great asset to Reclamation as it ensures the reliable generation of clean renewable electricity into the future." As senior advisor, Spiker will coordinate implementation of corporate partnership efforts involving Reclamation's power functions and serve as the liaison on intergovernmental initiatives associated with hydropower delivery and be responsible for Reclamation's overall compliance with Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Mandatory Bulk Electric System Reliability Standards. He will also coordinate activities in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Bonneville Power Administration, Western Area Power Administration and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Since 2013 Spiker has been the power resources manager where he worked with Reclamation offices in managing Reclamation's hydropower operation and maintenance program, reliability compliance program and renewable energy program. He joined Reclamation's Power Resources Office in 2010 as the operation and maintenance program manager where he provided policy direction and oversight. He previously held multiple positions including mechanical journeyman at Hoover Dam, facility manager at Green Mountain Dam, Estes Lake and Marys Lake power plants, facility manager of the Colorado - Big Thompson Project and power manager of the Upper Colorado Region where he managed the power program on the upper Colorado River and its tributaries, including Glen Canyon Dam, Flaming Gorge Dam and the facilities on the Gunnison River. Spiker has more than 28 years of experience with Reclamation. He graduated from Weber State University in 1988 with an Associate of Science degree in Construction Technology. He begins his new responsibilities this week.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

With its distinctively earthy flavor found in no other fruit, the native Muscadine has been called “America’s Grape.” An East Tennessee vineyard specializing in growing Muscadines has now made Tennessee wine history, producing the most decorated wine of any kind made in Tennessee. “Hiwassee,” a dry white wine produced from Muscadines grown by Tsali Notch Vineyard near Madisonville, has won five wine medals this season, more than any other vintage in Tennessee wine history. Hiwassee won a Concordance Gold Medal at the 2016 Wines of the South Regional Wine Competition in Knoxville, Tennessee, as well as Best of White, Best Muscadine, and Best of Tennessee Fruit. Hiwassee also received a Silver Medal in 2016 and a Gold Medal in 2015 at the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition, the largest wine competition in the United States. “In 15 years of Wines of the South Regional Wine Competition history, no single wine has ever been given the recognition received by Tsali Notch Vineyard’s Hiwassee,” said Mark Morgan, director of the competition. Cary L. Cox, owner of Tsali Notch, said his focus has always been on growing quality fruit, since purchasing the vineyard in 2009. “You can make good wine from good fruit, but it takes a great fruit to make a great wine,” said Cox. “That’s what we strive to do at the vineyard. We try to produce the best fruit we possibly can. This dry white wine, Hiwassee, belies the notion that all good dry whites come from that valley in California.” Under Tennessee’s farm winery rules, Tsali Notch sends its fruit out to other state wineries to be made into wines under its label. Hiwassee was crafted by Brian Hamm of Keg Springs Winery in Hampton, Tennessee. “This is not the first award-winning wine from Tsali Notch Vineyard,” said Hamm. “Multiple other Best Of Show, Best of Tennessee and Concordance Gold Medal wines have been produced from grapes grown at Tsali Notch.” In fact, three out of the last four Best of Tennessee fruit awards at Wines of the South have come from grapes grown at Tsali Notch. Tsali Notch used to be the site of a dairy farm. The first Muscadine vines were planted in 2003, and Cox and other investors purchased it at auction in 2009. Now the sole owner, Cox began sending the Muscadines out to make wine 2012. The vineyard also has jams, jellies, and a variety of other Muscadine products for sale in its historic log cabin tasting room. A post-Civil War two-room farmhouse offers a spot for events as well. "The vineyard is home to the National Muscadine Festival and the Muscadine Balloon Fiesta, both in September, celebrating the fruit we grow so well here in Monroe County," said J.D. Dalton, Tsali Notch Vineyard manager. Tsali Notch Vineyard gets its unusual name from the martyred Cherokee Chief, Tsali. “And ‘notch' is a reference to geography,” said Cox. “The farm is notched into the hillside. For me, this has been so rewarding, to see the land support itself, to grow the fruit, to make it into wine, and to host successful events here in the vineyard." The gentle rolling hills of East Tennessee are quickly becoming known as a thriving “wine country.” The “Nine Lakes” region of East Tennessee– which encompasses the 16-county region around Knoxville, is named for the nine lakes formed when the Tennessee Valley Authority built a number of dams in the region to provide hydroelectric power in the 1930s and 1940s. The Nine Lakes Region is home to more vineyards and wineries than any other part of Tennessee, and grapes are the fastest growing segment of agriculture in the state. “The Nine Lakes Region provides a unique climate, soils, elevation and physical features that impart a special character, or ‘terroir,’ to the grapes grown here,” said James R. Riddle, President of the Appalachian Region Wine Producers Association. “When combined with the skills of a talented winemaker, this creates a wine unique to East Tennessee. This climate is dominated by the ‘rain shadow’ effect, offered by the geography of the Cumberland Plateau and the Appalachian Mountain Valley of East Tennessee. When combined with the lake influences, this creates a climate unique to anywhere in the United States.” The wine association has been instrumental in establishing two of the three wine trails in the region, Great Valley Wine Trail and Foothills Wine & Cider Trail. The wine trails will join together with others at Nine Lakes Wine Festival, May 19-20 on the waterfront in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Award-winning wines like Hiwassee will be featured at a Winemaker’s Dinner May 19, and on May 20, a Grand Tasting will provide the opportunity for the public to try more than 100 Tennessee made wines. “This is an opportunity for the public to taste award-winning Tennessee wines,” said Riddle. “Very often we find that people have never tried a Tennessee wine. When they do, they are often amazed at how that wine compares with the best they’ve ever had.” Tickets for the Grand Tasting May 20, as well as a Winemakers Dinner May 19, are on sale now at the festival’s website, http://www.NineLakesWineFestival.com.


A method and an automation system for processing information extractable from an engineering drawing file. The automation system includes a controller which models in the engineering drawing file (20) at least two objects (302, 304) in a predefined format by adding at least two entities (34) to the engineering drawing file (20) (S501) and by adding support information (35) to the engineering drawing file (20) (S502) to provide the extractable information (S401), provides a program sequence (80) in an automation application (50) to establish a correlation of the extractable information (S402), correlates the extractable information by executing the program sequence (80) (S403), and generates output data (12, 15) based on the established correlation of the extractable information (S404). The correlation of the extractable information is established only while the program sequence (80) of the automation application (50) is being executed.


Patent
Tennessee Valley Authority | Date: 2013-08-30

A solar photovoltaic panel system which has a thermal sink and a panel mounting structure is provided. The panel mounting structure contains a water flow section. The water flow section includes an inflow section and an outflow section. A solar photovoltaic panel is mounted between the inflow section and the outflow section. A water supply system is connected to the panel mounting structure to provide water on a top surface of the solar photovoltaic panel. The water provided from the thermal sink is returned to the thermal sink after flowing on the top surface of the solar photovoltaic panel.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Contract Interagency Agreement | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 17.85K | Year: 2014

None

Loading Tennessee Valley Authority collaborators
Loading Tennessee Valley Authority collaborators