Tema General Hospital

Tema, Ghana

Tema General Hospital

Tema, Ghana
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Amidu N.,University for Development Studies | Owiredu W.K.,Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology | Alidu H.,Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology | Sarpong C.,Tema General Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome | Year: 2013

Background: The worldwide epidemic of diabetes and obesity has resulted in a rapid upsurge in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS). MetS makes the individual liable to endothelial dysfunction which can initiate sexual dysfunction (SD). This study assessed the association between MetS and SD among clinically diagnosed diabetic subjects in Tema, Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Method. Sexual functioning was assessed using Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction in 300 consecutive diabetic men visiting the diabetic clinic of Tema General Hospital between November, 2010 and March, 2011. Anthropometric data including waist and hip circumference as well as blood pressure were measured. The levels of fasting blood glucose and serum lipid profile were assessed. All the men had a steady heterosexual relationship for at least 2 years before enrolment in the study. Results: The response rate was 91.3% out of the 300 subjects recruited for the study. Those with SD were significantly older and had diabetes for a longer period as compared to those without SD. The prevalence of MetS as defined by the various criteria was 78.8%, 43.4% and 51.8% for WHO, NCEP ATP III and IDF respectively. Central obesity (p = 0.0482) and raised blood pressure (p = 0.0309) are the significant MetS components when the studied population was stratified according to sexual functioning. Generally, SD as well as its sub-scales correlate positively with age, blood pressure, duration of diabetes and MetS score. Whereas TC and LDL-c correlated positively with non-communication, TG correlates positively with avoidance and infrequency. Conclusion: SD and its sub-scales have a direct relationship with duration of diabetes, blood pressure and MetS score from this study. Central obesity and raised blood pressure seem to be the link between MetS and SD among this clinically diagnosed diabetic subjects. © 2013 Amidu et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Okyere E.,Kintampo Health Research Center | Tawiah-Agyemang C.,Kintampo Health Research Center | Manu A.,Kintampo Health Research Center | Deganus S.,Tema General Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Annals of Tropical Paediatrics | Year: 2010

Aims: To explore the role of a traditional illness of the newborn, asram, in care-seeking in rural Ghana. Methods: Data are from formative research into newborn care which included collecting qualitative data from 14 villages in Brong Ahafo region of Ghana through 25 birth narratives, 30 in-depth interviews and two focus groups with recently delivered/pregnant women, 20 in-depth interviews and six focus groups with birth attendants/grandmothers, 12 in-depth interviews and two focus groups with husbands, and six in-depth interviews with asram healers. Results: The study confirmed that asram is characterised by symptoms which include green/black veins, a big head and the newborn growing lean. However, a complex classification of 14 types of asram covering a wide array of symptoms was identified. Asram was perceived as a common illness which cannot be treated at health facilities and to which many danger signs in the newborn are attributed, and thus it affects care-seeking. Asram treatment includes frequent cold herbal baths and air-drying; however, oral treatments and preventive bathing are also used. Any modification of asram treatment was reported to require the sanction of a healer. Conclusion: Understanding traditional illnesses as a potential barrier to newborn care-seeking is essential for designing care-seeking interventions. An asram diagnosis can prevent sick newborns being taken to health facilities and traditional treatment exposes them to the risk of hypothermia. © 2010 W. S. Maney & Son Ltd.


Ephraim R.K.D.,Medical Laboratory Division | Osakunor D.N.M.,Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology | Cudjoe O.,Medical Laboratory Division | Oduro E.A.,Medical Laboratory Division | And 4 more authors.
BMC Nephrology | Year: 2015

Background: Renal involvement in sickle cell disease (SCD) contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) amongst SCD patients, and how basic clinical variables differ across haemoglobin genotypes. Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study conducted from December 2013 to May 2014 at the Sickle cell clinic of the Tema General Hospital. One hundred and ninety-four (194) participants with SCD, receiving medical care at the outpatient sickle cell clinic were enrolled onto the study. A structured questionnaire was administered to obtain information on demography, clinical history, blood pressure and anthropometry. Blood and urine samples were taken for serum creatinine and proteinuria determination respectively. The estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated using the CKD-EPI and Schwartz equations. CKD was defined according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines. Analysis was performed using GraphPad prism and P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: CKD was present in 39.2 % of participants. Using KDIGO guidelines, 40.8 % of the HbSS participants had stage 1 CKD and none had stage 2 CKD. In addition, 30.8 % of the HbSC participants had stage 1 CKD and 3.8 % had stage 2 CKD. There was a trend of increasing age across CKD stages and stage 2 CKD participants were oldest (P∈<∈0.001). Conclusion: Results from the current study suggest that CKD is common amongst SCD patients and prevalence and intensity increases with age. Proteinuria and CKD was more common in HbSS genotype than in HbSC genotype. © 2015 Ephraim et al.; licensee BioMed Central.


Adinortey M.B.,University Of Cape Coast | Gyan B.A.,University of Ghana | Adjimani J.P.,University of Ghana | Nyarko P.E.,University of Ghana | And 3 more authors.
Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry | Year: 2011

There is scanty information on the role of genetic factors, especially those relating to haptoglobin (Hp) phenotypes in the expression of complications among diabetes mellitus patients in Ghana. In this study, we investigated whether there is any association between Hp phenotypes and diabetic complications and to determine if association of the Hp phenotypes with diabetic complications in Ghanaian diabetics differ from those in Caucasians. A total of 398 participants were randomly recruited into the study. These comprised diabetic patients numbering 290 attending a diabetes Clinic in Ghana and 108 non-diabetic controls from the same community. Analyses of the results indicate that most of the diabetics with complications were of the Hp 2-2 (35%) and Hp 2-1 (23.9%) phenotypes. Fewer diabetics were found to be of the Hp 2-1 M phenotype. The controls were mostly of Hp 1-1 and Hp 2-1 M phenotypes. The odds ratio of having complications in a diabetic with an Hp 2-2 phenotype was 18.27 times greater than that for Hp 0-0. Hp 2-2 phenotype with its poor antioxidant activity may therefore be a useful predictor for the propensity of an individual to develop diabetes complications. © 2011 Association of Clinical Biochemists of India.


Owiredu W.K.B.A.,Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology | Amidu N.,Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology | Alidu H.,Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology | Sarpong C.,Tema General Hospital | Gyasi-Sarpong C.K.,Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology | Year: 2011

Background: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that can result in various medical, psychological and sexual dysfunctions (SD) if not properly managed. SD in men is a common under-appreciated complication of diabetes. This study assessed the prevalence and determinants of SD among diabetic patients in Tema, Greater Accra Region of Ghana.Method: Sexual functioning was determined in 300 consecutive diabetic men (age range: 18-82 years) visiting the diabetic clinic of Tema General Hospital with the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS) questionnaire, between November, 2010 and March, 2011. In addition to the socio-demographic characteristics of the participants, the level of glycosylated haemoglobin, fasting blood sugar (FBS) and serum testosterone were assessed. All the men had a steady heterosexual relationship for at least 2 years before enrolment in the study.Results: Out the 300 participants contacted, the response rate was 91.3% after 20 declined participation and 6 incomplete data were excluded All the respondents had at least basic education, 97.4% were married, 65.3% were known hypertensive, 3.3% smoked cigarettes, 27% took alcoholic beverages and 32.8% did some form of exercise. The 69.3% SD rate observed in this study appears to be related to infrequency (79.2%), non-sensuality (74.5%), dissatisfaction with sexual acts (71.9%), non-communication (70.8%) and impotence (67.9%). Other areas of sexual function, including premature ejaculation (56.6%) and avoidance (42.7%) were also substantially affected. However, severe SD was seen in only 4.7% of the studied population. The perceived "adequate", "desirable", "too short" and "too long intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) are 5-10, 5-10, 1-2 and 15-30 minutes respectively. Testosterone correlates negatively with glycated haemoglobin (HBA1c), FBS, perceived desirable, too short IELT, and weight as well as waist circumference.Conclusion: SD rate from this study is high but similar to that reported among self-reported diabetic patients in Kumasi, Ghana and vary according to the condition and age. The determinants of SD from this study are income level, exercise, obesity, higher perception of "desirable" and "too short" IELT. © 2011 Owiredu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Adinortey M.B.,University Of Cape Coast | Gyan B.E.,University of Ghana | Adjimani J.,University of Ghana | Nyarko P.,University of Ghana | And 3 more authors.
Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry | Year: 2011

In this study, differences in lipid levels amongst diabetics with and without complications were assessed to determine lipid disorders that are associated with diabetic complications other than cardiovascular diseases. A Cross sectional study design was employed. The study included 288 diabetics and 108 non diabetics with different types of complications such as hypertension, nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. The mean serum total cholesterol was higher in patients with complications compared to those without complications and the non-diabetic controls. The normotensive diabetic patients had the lowest total cholesterol among the diabetic patients' groups (4.65 ± 0.17 mmol/l) compared to the diabetics with hypertension (6.051 ± 0.20 mmol/l), retinopathy (6.26 ± 0.29 mmol/l), neuropathy (5.80 ± 0.17 mmol/l) and nephropathy patients 5.74 ± 0.26 mmol/l (P < 0.05). The prevalence of dyslipidaemia among diabetic subjects was between 19.2 and 84.0%. The study shows that, in addition to macrovascular complications, dyslipidaemia is common in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with microvascular complications. © 2011 Association of Clinical Biochemists of India.


Seshie B.,Tema General Hospital | Adu-Aryee N.A.,University of Ghana | Dedey F.,University of Ghana | Calys-Tagoe B.,University of Ghana | Clegg-Lamptey J.-N.,University of Ghana
BMC Clinical Pathology | Year: 2015

Background: Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease composed of multiple subgroups with different molecular alterations, cellular composition, clinical behaviour, and response to treatment. This study evaluates the occurrence of the various subtypes and their clinical and pathological behaviour in the Ghanaian breast cancer population at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH). Methods: Retrospective review of case notes of patients who had completed treatment for breast cancer at the KBTH within the last 5 years was conducted between April 2011 and March 2012. Subtypes were determined by immunohistochemistry classification based on expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). Result: A total of 165 cases contributed to this study. The mean age at diagnosis was 52.5 ±∈12.1 years. Tumour size ranged from 0.8 cm to 15 cm with a mean of 4.9∈±∈2.8 cm and median of 4 cm. Tumour grade was Grade I 8.3 %, Grade II 60.8 % and Grade III 30.8 %. ER, PR and HER2/neu receptor positivity was 32.1, 25.6 and 25.5 % respectively. Almost half (49.4 %) of the study population had triple negative tumours. Luminal A, luminal B and non-luminal HER2 were 25.6, 12.2, and 12.8 % respectively. No statistically significant association was seen between subtype and tumour size, tumour grade, lymph node status and age at diagnosis. Conclusion: Triple negative tumour is the most occurring subtype in the Ghanaian breast cancer population treated at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital. Lack of association seen between subtypes and their clinical and pathological behaviour could be due to small sample size. © 2015 Seshie et al.


PubMed | Tema General Hospital, Family and Reproductive Health and Formerly of West African AIDS Foundation
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of MCH and AIDS | Year: 2016

Developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and partners, the correct adaptation and implementation of the global guidelines on prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV is critical. This study explored the challenges that health workers face implementing WHOs PMTCT guidelines, and the experiences of HIV-positive clients receiving these services.We interacted with 14 health professionals, and 16 PMTCT clients through in-depth interviews. Four of seven PMTCT sites within the Accra Metropolis were purposively included. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed, analyzed, and then sorted into themes.Health workers had challenges translating PMTCT guidelines into useful messages for their clients. Their counselling was often prescriptive. Counselors identified inadequate in-service training as a key reason for their out-dated and inconsistent messages. HIV-positive clients exhibited general knowledge about the importance of doing exclusive breast-feeding for the first six months of life. Clients had confidence in antiretroviral for PMTCT. However, deeply rooted socio-cultural practices and the attitudes of counselors remain challenges to clients.Counselors require refresher training which addresses, among other things, long-held socio-cultural practices. Publicizing these challenges will prod policy makers and program implementers to develop strategies that address the challenges both locally and globally.


PubMed | Kwame Nkrumah University Of Science And Technology, Medical Laboratory Division and Tema General Hospital
Type: | Journal: BMC nephrology | Year: 2015

Renal involvement in sickle cell disease (SCD) contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) amongst SCD patients, and how basic clinical variables differ across haemoglobin genotypes.A hospital-based cross-sectional study conducted from December 2013 to May 2014 at the Sickle cell clinic of the Tema General Hospital. One hundred and ninety-four (194) participants with SCD, receiving medical care at the outpatient sickle cell clinic were enrolled onto the study. A structured questionnaire was administered to obtain information on demography, clinical history, blood pressure and anthropometry. Blood and urine samples were taken for serum creatinine and proteinuria determination respectively. The estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated using the CKD-EPI and Schwartz equations. CKD was defined according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines. Analysis was performed using GraphPad prism and P <0.05 was considered statistically significant.CKD was present in 39.2% of participants. Using KDIGO guidelines, 40.8% of the HbSS participants had stage 1 CKD and none had stage 2 CKD. In addition, 30.8% of the HbSC participants had stage 1 CKD and 3.8% had stage 2 CKD. There was a trend of increasing age across CKD stages and stage 2 CKD participants were oldest (P<0.001).Results from the current study suggest that CKD is common amongst SCD patients and prevalence and intensity increases with age. Proteinuria and CKD was more common in HbSS genotype than in HbSC genotype.

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