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Tehran, Iran

Tehran University of Medical science is the largest, "most distinguished", and most highly ranked medical school of Iran. In September 2008, the health minister of Iran called TUMS a pioneer in research throughout the country with a noticeable lead over its counterpart universities.Located in Tehran adjacent to the main University of Tehran campus, it was founded as part of Dar ol-Fonoon, and later absorbed into Tehran University in 1934. It finally separated from Tehran University by parliamentary legislation in 1986, coming under the new Ministry of Health and Medical Education.TUMS is ranked as one of Iran's top research universities, with an annual research budget of over 300 billion Rials from the government. The school trains over 13,000 students in over 80 postgraduate programs. The school operates 15 teaching hospitals, is equipped with over 40 libraries, and publishes 34 journals, some in collaboration with academic societies.The university operates The National Museum of Medical science History as well.TUMS is accredited by Accreditation Service for International Colleges and Universities Wikipedia.


Mahdavi-Mazdeh M.,Tehran University of Medical Sciences
Kidney International | Year: 2012

Organ shortage for transplantation remains a worldwide serious problem for kidney patients with end-stage renal failure, and several countries have tried different models to address this issue. Iran has 20 years of experience with one such model that involves the active role of the government and charity foundations. Patients with a desperate demand for a kidney have given rise to a black market of brokers and other forms of organ commercialism only accessible to those with sufficient financial resources. The current Iranian model has enabled most of the Iranian kidney transplant candidates, irrespective of socioeconomic class, to have access to kidney transplantation. The Iranian government has committed a large budget through funding hospital and staff at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education by supporting the brain death donation (BDD) program or redirecting part of the budget of living unrelated renal donation (LURD) to the BDD program. It has been shown that it did not prevent the development and progression of a BDD program. However, the LURD program is characterized by several controversial procedures (e.g., confrontation of donor and recipient at the end of the evaluation procedure along with some financial interactions) that should be ethically reviewed. Operational weaknesses such as the lack of a registration system and long-term follow-up of the donors are identified as the Achilles heel of the model. © 2012 International Society of Nephrology. Source


Sobhani Z.,Tehran University of Medical Sciences
International journal of nanomedicine | Year: 2011

Potential applications of carbon nanotubes have attracted many researchers in the field of drug delivery systems. In this study, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were first functionalized using hyperbranched poly citric acid (PCA) to improve their hydrophilicity and functionality. Then, paclitaxel (PTX), a potent anticancer agent, was conjugated to the carboxyl functional groups of poly citric acid via a cleavable ester bond to obtain a MWNT-g-PCA-PTX conjugate. Drug content of the conjugate was about 38% (w/w). The particle size of MWNT-g-PCA and MWNT-g-PCA-PTX was approximately 125 and 200 nm, respectively. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed a curved shape for MWNT-g-PCA and MWNT-g-PCA-PTX, which was in contrast with the straight or linear conformation expected from carbon nanotubes. It seems that the high hydrophilicity of poly citric acid and high hydrophobicity of MWNTs led to conformational changes from a linear state to a curved state. Paclitaxel can be released from the MWNT-g-PCA-PTX conjugates faster at pH 6.8 and 5.0 than at pH 7.4, which was suitable for the release of the drug in tumor tissues and tumor cells. In vitro cytotoxicity studies were evaluated in the A549 and SKOV3 cell lines. MWNT-g-PCA had an insignificant cytotoxic effect on both cell lines. MWNT-g-PCA-PTX had more of a cytotoxic effect than the free drug over a shorter incubation time (eg, 24 hours versus 48 hours), which suggests improved cell penetration of MWNT-g-PCA-PTX. Therefore, paclitaxel conjugated to MWNT-g-PCA is promising for cancer therapeutics. Source


Shirkoohi R.,Tehran University of Medical Sciences
Cancer Science | Year: 2013

The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), a pathologic phenomenon in cancer, has a twin in the embryonic period of life. In the first one, its promotion will cause metastasis to become a life-threatening stage of cancer, while in the second it will lead to organogenesis, which is necessary for all living creatures. There is one more from this phenomenon, which occurs during the wound healing process and if dys-regulated can lead to fibrosis. In both there are stimulants in common and one that are different. Stages start from cell-cell junction dissociation followed by morphological changes and behavioral and essence alterations. To control the EMT as a bizarre disturbance in cancer and metastasis, initially it is better to understand the wonder of natural gestational orchestration in early life. In this review, first the structure of the two heads of the spectrum is described followed by the cellular and micro-environmental alterations during this phenomenon. Understanding cellular behavior in this process and what makes them invasive resistant stemness cells will be of great importance in highlighting roads to cancer treatment. © 2012 Japanese Cancer Association. Source


Bonab M.M.,Tehran University of Medical Sciences
Current stem cell research & therapy | Year: 2012

Despite updating knowledge and a growing number of medications for multiple sclerosis (MS), no definite treatment is available yet for patients suffering from progressive forms of the disease. Autologous bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC) transplantation is a promising method proposed as a therapy for MS. Although the safety of these cells has been confirmed in hematological, cardiac and inflammatory diseases, its efficacy in MS treatment is still under study. Patients with progressive MS (expanded disability status scale score: 4.0 -6.50) unresponsive to conventional treatments were recruited for this study. Twenty-five patients [f/m: 19/6, mean age: 34.7±7] received a single intrathecal injection of ex-vivo expanded MSCs (mean dose: 29.5×10(6) cells). We observed their therapeutic response for 12 months. Associated short-term adverse events of injection consisted of transient low-grade fever, nausea /vomiting, weakness in the lower limbs and headache. No major delayed adverse effect was reported. 3 patients left the study for personal reasons. The mean (SD) expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score of 22 patients changed from 6.1 (0.6) to 6.3 (0.4). Clinical course of the disease (measured by EDSS) improved in 4, deteriorated in 6 and had no change in 12 patients. In MRI evaluation, 15 patients showed no change, whereas 6 patients showed new T2 or gadolinium enhanced lesions (1 lost to follow-up). It seems that MSC therapy can improve/stabilize the course of the disease in progressive MS in the first year after injection with no serious adverse effects. Repeating the study with a larger sample size, booster injections and longer follow-up using a controlled study design is advised. Source


Ai J.,Tehran University of Medical Sciences
International journal of nanomedicine | Year: 2011

Nanotechnology has wide applications in many fields, especially in the biological sciences and medicine. Nanomaterials are applied as coating materials or in treatment and diagnosis. Nanoparticles such as titania, zirconia, silver, diamonds, iron oxides, carbon nanotubes, and biodegradable polymers have been studied in diagnosis and treatment. Many of these nanoparticles may have toxic effects on cells. Many factors such as size, inherent properties, and surface chemistry may cause nanoparticle toxicity. There are methods for improving the performance and reducing toxicity of nanoparticles in medical design, such as biocompatible coating materials or biodegradable/biocompatible nanoparticles. Most metal oxide nanoparticles show toxic effects, but no toxic effects have been observed with biocompatible coatings. Biodegradable nanoparticles are also used in the efficient design of medical materials, which will be reviewed in this article. Source

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