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News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The IAB Technology Laboratory has released “Transitioning Video Ads from Flash to HTML5/JS,” practical guidance for migrating digital video advertisements to HTML5 and JavaScript, technologies which have emerged as the default media playback options in the majority of today’s browsers. In addition, the IAB Tech Lab recommends that all video ads in the market should be HTML5 based by July 2017. Recognizing that this creates technical and operational hurdles that require time and planning, the IAB Tech Lab suggests that publishers, brands, and agencies take steps to shift the mix of ads from Flash to HTML5 and JavaScript-based ads over the course of the first six months of 2017. As a complement to this transition paper, the IAB Tech Lab provides two detailed checklists to ease the transition for different stakeholders—one is designed for publishers, and the other for brands and agencies. Both include such tailored suggestions as communications best practices and information regarding the technical components that need to be updated. The IAB Tech Lab will also release tools such as a VAST Validator and a JS VPAID tester by January 2017 to help with the transition. “The move from Flash to HTML5 and JavaScript is vital to improving user experience in digital video advertising,” said Alanna Gombert, Senior Vice President, Technology and Ad Operations, IAB, and General Manager, IAB Tech Lab. “We recognize that it’s a complex transition—one that cannot happen overnight. This guidance provides practical insights and how-to’s that simplify and facilitate the process for publishers, brands, and media agencies, as we build a stronger foundation for video marketing.” “Transitioning Video Ads from Flash to HTML5/JS” is available for download at iabtechlab.com/html5videotransition. The IAB Technology Laboratory is an independent, international, nonprofit research and development consortium charged with producing and helping companies implement global industry technical standards. Comprised of digital publishers and ad technology firms, as well as marketers, agencies, and other companies with interests in the interactive marketing arena, the IAB Tech Lab’s goal is to reduce friction associated with the digital advertising and marketing supply chain, while contributing to the safe and secure growth of the industry. The organization’s founding member companies include AppNexus, Google, GroupM, Hearst Magazines Digital Media, LinkedIn, PubMatic, Sonobi, Tremor Video, Yahoo, and Yahoo! JAPAN. Established in 2014, the IAB Tech Lab is headquartered in New York City with an office in San Francisco.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Port of Hueneme darts to the future with its cutting-edge Innovation and Technology Expo, a program that challenges industry, technology developers and college and high school students to meet industry needs with the best in technology. It all unfolds as part of the Port’s Maritime Advanced Systems & Technology Laboratory (MAST) program, an initiative designed to encourage entrepreneurs and innovators to embrace the Port as an incubator to pilot new products and foster leading-edge technology for the port and maritime environment. Today’s event drew a crowd of over 175 participants at the third annual event. The program opened with dual tracks, one focusing in on the port security needs and the possible technological advancements to fill those gaps. Commissioner Jason Hodge, a local firefighter, charged the group up with his remarks, “The dialogue between law enforcement teams and the developers of technology promises to build a bridge necessary to protect life and critical infrastructure. We have created the venue for the dialogue here today that promises to spawn cutting-edge capabilities that align with the needs of our public safety officials. It will make all the difference.” The second track focused on our youth and local students, helping them identify career opportunities in the maritime field specific to engineering, innovation and technology. In attendance were Oxnard High School students and STEM students from Oxnard Community College. Commissioner Mary Anne Rooney greeted the students this morning instilling them with hope for their futures, ”By attending this morning you’ll be able to observe technologies and demonstrations presented by real-life industry professionals. It is our hope that you will discover personal career direction within the Maritime industry. Discoveries that can help direct your educational paths that can lead to fulfilling career opportunities.” The two tracks merged in the late morning with the technology expo and maritime career exhibits. Unmanned aerial and underwater vehicles, the latest in lighting technologies, surveillance and communication equipment were among some of the impressive cutting edge technologies on display and demonstration. The afternoon became a working session of critical stakeholders in public safety, industry and technology. During two breakout sessions, problem statements for industry operations and for public safety were developed to challenge the technology experts to develop the solutions. To emphasize the goal, Port CEO and Director Kristin Decas commented, “The intent is to marry up the needs of industry and public safety officials with developers that innovate their tools and realize actionable results. We are proud to be a world-class Port seeking world-class solutions to sustain the viability of the Port and the entire community we serve.” Officer Peter Frieberg with the Port Hueneme Police Department noted, “The panel discussions were productive and fruitful. It was a positive to have all of these knowledgeable stakeholders voicing their technology successes as well as gaps. One could feel the energy in the room with all these entrepreneurs and technologists addressing how to resolve our real-world issues.” Exhibitors with projects at the expo included. Aerial Alchemy, AUVSI, Cal State University Channel Islands, Datastew, EDC-VC, Eyes On, Flame Sniffer, GBL, GT2-CTM, NAVFAC, the Ventura County Sheriff Department’s Bomb Squad, Perceptronics, Starlite, Stellar Biotech, the Long Beach Police Department, the Ventura County Office of Education, the Ventura County Fire Department, Virtual Port, the Oxnard Police Dive Team, Wounded Eagle, U.S. Department of Customs and Border Protection, the United States Coast Guard, Ports America Inc, Del Monte Fresh, Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics, Glovis USA, Cal Maritime Academy and TracTide Marine. The MAST Lab/incubator concept was established under the leadership of the Port with the support and partnership of the Center for Threat Management and the Economic Development Collaborative of Ventura County (EDC-VC) as a cooperative research and development program. The Laboratory leverages the unique geographical, operational, and environmental assets inherent at the Port of Hueneme and provides collaborative stakeholders with a sustained platform for research, experimentation and testing. Christina Birdsey the Port’s Director of the MAST program said, “We’re really excited to make our unique environment available through the MAST Lab and providing entrepreneurs and companies with a test and research platform that might not otherwise be available to them. We encourage all entrepreneurs whether in logistics, environmental protection or safety and security to take advantage of our MAST lab, we believe these partnerships will ultimately improve the maritime and port domain.” The Port of Hueneme is one of the most productive and efficient commercial trade gateways for niche cargo on the West Coast. The Port is governed by five locally elected Port Commissioners. The Port moves $9 billion in goods each year and consistently ranks among the top ten U.S. ports for automobiles and fresh produce. Port operations support the community by bringing $1.5 billion in economic activity and creating 13,633 trade-related jobs. Trade through the Port of Hueneme generates more than $93 million in direct and related state and local taxes, which fund vital community services.


News Article | September 6, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

A new technique invented at MIT can precisely measure the growth of many individual cells simultaneously. The advance holds promise for fast drug tests, offers new insights into growth variation across single cells within larger populations, and helps track the dynamic growth of cells to changing environmental conditions. The technique, described in a paper published in Nature Biotechnology, uses an array of suspended microchannel resonators (SMR), a type of microfluidic device that measures the mass of individual cells as they flow through tiny channels. A novel design has increased throughput of the device by nearly two orders of magnitude, while retaining precision. The paper’s senior author, MIT professor Scott Manalis, and other researchers have been developing SMRs for nearly a decade. In the new study, the researchers used the device to observe the effects of antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides on bacteria, and to pinpoint growth variations of single cells among populations, which has important clinical applications. Slower-growing bacteria, for instance, can sometimes be more resistant to antibiotics and may lead to recurrent infections. “The device provides new insights into how cells grow and respond to drugs,” says Manalis, the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi professor in the MIT departments of Biological Engineering and Mechanical Engineering and a member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. The paper’s lead authors are Nathan Cermak, a recent PhD graduate from MIT’s Computational and Systems Biology Program, and Selim Olcum, a research scientist at the Koch Institute. There are 13 other co-authors on the paper, from the Koch Institute, MIT’s Microsystems Technology Laboratory, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Innovative Micro Technology, and CEA LETI in France. Manalis and his colleagues first developed the SMR in 2007 and have since introduced multiple innovations for different purposes, including to track single cell growth over time, measure cell density, weigh cell-secreted nanovesicles, and, most recently, measure the short-term growth response of cells in changing nutrient conditions. All of these techniques have relied on a crucial scheme: One fluid-filled microchannel is etched in a tiny silicon cantilever sensor that vibrates inside a vacuum cavity. When a cell enters the cantilever, it slightly alters the sensor’s vibration frequency, and this signal can be used to determine the cell’s weight. To measure a cell’s growth rate, Manalis and colleagues could pass an individual cell through the channel repeatedly, back and forth, over a period of about 20 minutes. During that time, a cell can accumulate mass that is measurable by the SMR. But while the SMR weighs cells 10 to 100 times more accurately than any other method, it has been limited to one cell at a time, meaning it could take many hours, or even days, to measure enough cells. The key to the new technology was designing and controlling an array of 10 to 12 cantilever sensors that act like weigh stations, recording the mass of a cell as it flows through the postage-stamp-sized device. Between each sensor are winding “delay channels,” each about five centimeters in length, through which the cells flow for about two minutes, giving them time to grow before reaching the next sensor. Whenever one cell exits a sensor, another cell can enter, increasing the device’s throughput. Results show the mass of each cell at each sensor, graphing the extent to which they’ve grown or shrunk. In the study, the researchers were able to measure about 60 mammalian cells and 150 bacteria per hour, compared to single SMRs, which measured only a few cells in that time. “Being able to rapidly measure the full distribution of growth rates shows us both how typical cells are behaving, an­­d also lets us detect outliers — which was previously very difficult with limited throughput or precision,” Cermak says. One comparable method for measuring masses of many individual cells simultaneously is called quantitative phase microscopy (QPM), which calculates the dry mass of cells by measuring their optical thickness. Unlike the SMR-based approach, QPM can be used on cells that grow adhered to surfaces. However, the SMR-based approach is significantly more precise. “We can reliably resolve changes of less than one-tenth of a percent of a cancer cell’s mass in about 20 minutes. This precision is proving to be essential for many of the clinical applications that we’re pursuing,” Olcum says. In one experiment using the device, the researchers observed the effects of an antibiotic, called kanamycin, on E. coli. Kanamycin inhibits protein synthesis in bacteria, eventually stopping their growth and killing the cells. Traditional antibiotic tests require growing a culture of bacteria, which could take a day or more. Using the new device, within an hour the researchers recorded a change in rate in which the cells accumulate mass. The reduced recording time is critical in testing drugs against bacterial infections in clinical settings, Manalis says. “In some cases, having a rapid test for selecting an antibiotic can make an important difference in the survival of a patient.” Similarly, the researchers used the device to observe the effects of an antimicrobial peptide called CM15, a relatively new protein-based candidate for fighting bacteria. Such candidates are increasingly important as bacteria strains become resistant to common antibiotics. CM15 makes microscopic holes in bacteria cell walls, such that the cell’s contents gradually leak out, eventually killing the cell. However, because only the mass of the cell changes and not its size, the effects may be missed by traditional microscopy techniques. Indeed, the researchers observed the E. coli cells rapidly losing mass immediately following exposure to CM15. Such results could lend validation to the peptide and other novel drugs by providing some insight into the mechanism, Manalis says. The researchers are currently working with members of the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, through the MIT/DFCI Bridge program, to determine if the device could be used to predict patient response to therapy by weighing tumor cells in the presence of anticancer drugs. Marc Kirschner, a professor and chair of the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School, who was not involved in the study, said the new microfluidics device will open up new avenues for studying the “physiology and pharmacology of cell growth. … Since growth is related to proliferation and to the stress a cell is under, it is a natural feature to study, but it has been difficult before this method.” “The technical problems to get this working were significant and it is still incredible for me to think that they pulled this off,” Kirschner adds. “I expect that when it is … into biology labs it will be useful for many problems in cancer, metabolism, cell death, and cell stress.”


News Article | September 6, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

A new technique invented at MIT can precisely measure the growth of many individual cells simultaneously. The advance holds promise for fast drug tests, offers new insights into growth variation across single cells within larger populations, and helps track the dynamic growth of cells to changing environmental conditions. The technique, described in a paper published in Nature Biotechnology, uses an array of suspended microchannel resonators (SMR), a type of microfluidic device that measures the mass of individual cells as they flow through tiny channels. A novel design has increased throughput of the device by nearly two orders of magnitude, while retaining precision. The paper’s senior author, MIT professor Scott Manalis, and other researchers have been developing SMRs for nearly a decade. In the new study, the researchers used the device to observe the effects of antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides on bacteria, and to pinpoint growth variations of single cells among populations, which has important clinical applications. Slower-growing bacteria, for instance, can sometimes be more resistant to antibiotics and may lead to recurrent infections. “The device provides new insights into how cells grow and respond to drugs,” says Manalis, the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor in the MIT departments of Biological Engineering and Mechanical Engineering and a member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. The paper’s lead authors are Nathan Cermak, a recent Ph.D. graduate from MIT’s Computational and Systems Biology Program, and Selim Olcum, a research scientist at the Koch Institute. There are 13 other co-authors on the paper, from the Koch Institute, MIT’s Microsystems Technology Laboratory, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Innovative Micro Technology, and CEA LETI in France. Manalis and his colleagues first developed the SMR in 2007 and have since introduced multiple innovations for different purposes, including to track single cell growth over time, measure cell density, weigh cell-secreted nanovesicles, and, most recently, measure the short-term growth response of cells in changing nutrient conditions. All of these techniques have relied on a crucial scheme: One fluid-filled microchannel is etched in a tiny silicon cantilever sensor that vibrates inside a vacuum cavity. When a cell enters the cantilever, it slightly alters the sensor’s vibration frequency, and this signal can be used to determine the cell’s weight. To measure a cell’s growth rate, Manalis and colleagues could pass an individual cell through the channel repeatedly, back and forth, over a period of about 20 minutes. During that time, a cell can accumulate mass that is measurable by the SMR. But while the SMR weighs cells 10 to 100 times more accurately than any other method, it has been limited to one cell at a time, meaning it could take many hours, or even days, to measure enough cells. The key to the new technology was designing and controlling an array of 10 to 12 cantilever sensors that act like weigh stations, recording the mass of a cell as it flows through the postage-stamp-sized device. Between each sensor are winding “delay channels,” each about five centimeters in length, through which the cells flow for about two minutes, giving them time to grow before reaching the next sensor. Whenever one cell exits a sensor, another cell can enter, increasing the device’s throughput. Results show the mass of each cell at each sensor, graphing the extent to which they’ve grown or shrunk. In the study, the researchers were able to measure about 60 mammalian cells and 150 bacteria per hour, compared to single SMRs, which measured only a few cells in that time. “Being able to rapidly measure the full distribution of growth rates shows us both how typical cells are behaving, an­­d also lets us detect outliers — which was previously very difficult with limited throughput or precision,” Cermak says. One comparable method for measuring masses of many individual cells simultaneously is called quantitative phase microscopy (QPM), which calculates the dry mass of cells by measuring their optical thickness. Unlike the SMR-based approach, QPM can be used on cells that grow adhered to surfaces. However, the SMR-based approach is significantly more precise. “We can reliably resolve changes of less than one-tenth of a percent of a cancer cell’s mass in about 20 minutes. This precision is proving to be essential for many of the clinical applications that we’re pursuing,” Olcum says. In one experiment using the device, the researchers observed the effects of an antibiotic, called kanamycin, on E. coli. Kanamycin inhibits protein synthesis in bacteria, eventually stopping their growth and killing the cells. Traditional antibiotic tests require growing a culture of bacteria, which could take a day or more. Using the new device, within an hour the researchers recorded a change in rate in which the cells accumulate mass. The reduced recording time is critical in testing drugs against bacterial infections in clinical settings, Manalis says: “In some cases, having a rapid test for selecting an antibiotic can make an important difference in the survival of a patient.” Similarly, the researchers used the device to observe the effects of an antimicrobial peptide called CM15, a relatively new protein-based candidate for fighting bacteria. Such candidates are increasingly important as bacteria strains become resistant to common antibiotics. CM15 makes microscopic holes in bacteria cell walls, such that the cell’s contents gradually leak out, eventually killing the cell. However, because only the mass of the cell changes and not its size, the effects may be missed by traditional microscopy techniques. Indeed, the researchers observed the E. coli cells rapidly losing mass immediately following exposure to CM15. Such results could lend validation to the peptide and other novel drugs by providing some insight into the mechanism, Manalis says. The researchers are currently working with members of the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, through the MIT/DFCI Bridge program, to determine if the device could be used to predict patient response to therapy by weighing tumor cells in the presence of anticancer drugs. Marc Kirschner, a professor and chair of the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School, who was not involved in the study, said the new microfluidics device will open up new avenues for studying the “physiology and pharmacology of cell growth. … Since growth is related to proliferation and to the stress a cell is under, it is a natural feature to study, but it has been difficult before this method.” “The technical problems to get this working were significant and it is still incredible for me to think that they pulled this off,” Kirschner adds. “I expect that when it is … into biology labs it will be useful for many problems in cancer, metabolism, cell death, and cell stress.” The research was sponsored, in part, by the U.S. Army Research Office, the Koch Institute and Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Bridge Project, the National Science Foundation, and the National Cancer Institute.


News Article | September 5, 2016
Site: news.mit.edu

A new technique invented at MIT can precisely measure the growth of many individual cells simultaneously. The advance holds promise for fast drug tests, offers new insights into growth variation across single cells within larger populations, and helps track the dynamic growth of cells to changing environmental conditions. The technique, described in a paper published in Nature Biotechnology, uses an array of suspended microchannel resonators (SMR), a type of microfluidic device that measures the mass of individual cells as they flow through tiny channels. A novel design has increased throughput of the device by nearly two orders of magnitude, while retaining precision. The paper’s senior author, MIT professor Scott Manalis, and other researchers have been developing SMRs for nearly a decade. In the new study, the researchers used the device to observe the effects of antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides on bacteria, and to pinpoint growth variations of single cells among populations, which has important clinical applications. Slower-growing bacteria, for instance, can sometimes be more resistant to antibiotics and may lead to recurrent infections. “The device provides new insights into how cells grow and respond to drugs,” says Manalis, the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor in the MIT departments of Biological Engineering and Mechanical Engineering and a member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. The paper’s lead authors are Nathan Cermak, a recent PhD graduate from MIT’s Computational and Systems Biology Program, and Selim Olcum, a research scientist at the Koch Institute. There are 13 other co-authors on the paper, from the Koch Institute, MIT’s Microsystems Technology Laboratory, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Innovative Micro Technology, and CEA LETI in France. Manalis and his colleagues first developed the SMR in 2007 and have since introduced multiple innovations for different purposes, including to track single cell growth over time, measure cell density, weigh cell-secreted nanovesicles, and, most recently, measure the short-term growth response of cells in changing nutrient conditions. All of these techniques have relied on a crucial scheme: One fluid-filled microchannel is etched in a tiny silicon cantilever sensor that vibrates inside a vacuum cavity. When a cell enters the cantilever, it slightly alters the sensor’s vibration frequency, and this signal can be used to determine the cell’s weight. To measure a cell’s growth rate, Manalis and colleagues could pass an individual cell through the channel repeatedly, back and forth, over a period of about 20 minutes. During that time, a cell can accumulate mass that is measurable by the SMR. But while the SMR weighs cells 10 to 100 times more accurately than any other method, it has been limited to one cell at a time, meaning it could take many hours, or even days, to measure enough cells. The key to the new technology was designing and controlling an array of 10 to 12 cantilever sensors that act like weigh stations, recording the mass of a cell as it flows through the postage-stamp-sized device. Between each sensor are winding “delay channels,” each about five centimeters in length, through which the cells flow for about two minutes, giving them time to grow before reaching the next sensor. Whenever one cell exits a sensor, another cell can enter, increasing the device’s throughput. Results show the mass of each cell at each sensor, graphing the extent to which they’ve grown or shrunk. In the study, the researchers were able to measure about 60 mammalian cells and 150 bacteria per hour, compared to single SMRs, which measured only a few cells in that time. “Being able to rapidly measure the full distribution of growth rates shows us both how typical cells are behaving, an­­d also lets us detect outliers — which was previously very difficult with limited throughput or precision,” Cermak says. One comparable method for measuring masses of many individual cells simultaneously is called quantitative phase microscopy (QPM), which calculates the dry mass of cells by measuring their optical thickness. Unlike the SMR-based approach, QPM can be used on cells that grow adhered to surfaces. However, the SMR-based approach is significantly more precise. “We can reliably resolve changes of less than one-tenth of a percent of a cancer cell’s mass in about 20 minutes. This precision is proving to be essential for many of the clinical applications that we’re pursuing,” Olcum says. In one experiment using the device, the researchers observed the effects of an antibiotic, called kanamycin, on E. coli. Kanamycin inhibits protein synthesis in bacteria, eventually stopping their growth and killing the cells. Traditional antibiotic tests require growing a culture of bacteria, which could take a day or more. Using the new device, within an hour the researchers recorded a change in rate in which the cells accumulate mass. The reduced recording time is critical in testing drugs against bacterial infections in clinical settings, Manalis says: “In some cases, having a rapid test for selecting an antibiotic can make an important difference in the survival of a patient.” Similarly, the researchers used the device to observe the effects of an antimicrobial peptide called CM15, a relatively new protein-based candidate for fighting bacteria. Such candidates are increasingly important as bacteria strains become resistant to common antibiotics. CM15 makes microscopic holes in bacteria cell walls, such that the cell’s contents gradually leak out, eventually killing the cell. However, because only the mass of the cell changes and not its size, the effects may be missed by traditional microscopy techniques. Indeed, the researchers observed the E. coli cells rapidly losing mass immediately following exposure to CM15. Such results could lend validation to the peptide and other novel drugs by providing some insight into the mechanism, Manalis says. The researchers are currently working with members of the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, through the the Koch Institute and Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Bridge Project, to determine if the device could be used to predict patient response to therapy by weighing tumor cells in the presence of anticancer drugs. Marc Kirschner, a professor and chair of the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School, who was not involved in the study, said the new microfluidics device will open up new avenues for studying the “physiology and pharmacology of cell growth. … Since growth is related to proliferation and to the stress a cell is under, it is a natural feature to study, but it has been difficult before this method.” “The technical problems to get this working were significant and it is still incredible for me to think that they pulled this off,” Kirschner adds. “I expect that when it is … into biology labs it will be useful for many problems in cancer, metabolism, cell death, and cell stress.” The research was sponsored, in part, by the U.S. Army Research Office, the Koch Institute and Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Bridge Project, the National Science Foundation, and the National Cancer Institute.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Entice user engagement with a teaser that animates above content and expands when initiated NEW YORK, NY & TEL AVIV, ISRAEL--(Marketwired - November 07, 2016) - Undertone, a division of Perion Network Ltd. ( : PERI), and a leader in high-impact digital advertising solutions for brands, today announced the general availability of the Expandable Teaser ad format following successful beta testing with clients including BMW and Major League Soccer. The cross-screen format provides brands an innovative way to grab attention and drive engagement through great creative that enables consumers to control the advertising experience. The Expandable Teaser format is one of the first in digital advertising to be aligned with the Interactive Advertising Bureau Technology Laboratory (IAB Tech Lab) LEAN Principles. "The launch of Expandable Teaser ads continues the evolution and broadening of Undertone's product portfolio," said Undertone President Rob Schwartz. "With this new format, consumers have more control of the engaging and interactive features that connect them with the advertising experience. Brands like BMW now have more ways to attract consumers utilizing the stunning creative, innovative formats, and great service they have come to know and love from Undertone." Built to be mobile-first, but available across devices, the Expandable Teaser format animates a teaser ad above the content of a website, expanding when clicked by a consumer. A content overlay experience with a persistent and non-distracting presence on the page then appears. When prompted, it becomes an expanded canvas for brands to create experiences that engage their target audiences. The IAB Tech Lab released its LEAN Principles -- Light, Encrypted, Ad choice supported and Non-invasive ads -- in the fall of 2015, addressing the challenge posed by ad blocking and encouraging the industry to optimize the user experience. These principles were set to help guide the next phases of advertising technical standards for the global advertising supply chain. For more information about the Expandable Teaser format, please visit: http://www.undertone.com/format/expandable-teaser/. About Perion Network Ltd.Perion is a global technology company that delivers high-quality advertising solutions to brands and publishers. Perion is committed to providing outstanding execution, from high-impact ad formats to branded search and a unified social and mobile programmatic platform. More information about Perion may be found at http://www.perion.com, and follow Perion on Twitter @perionnetwork. About Undertone: Undertone is a leader in high quality, cross-screen digital brand advertising at scale. We build proprietary, cutting-edge solutions for the world's leading brands, that break through the clutter and truly stand out to create Unmissable experiences. Our innovative, award-winning digital ad formats, coupled with beautifully crafted creative, engage consumers through traditional and programmatic methods on top mobile and desktop properties. Learn more at www.undertone.com. Undertone is a subsidiary of Perion Network Ltd. This press release contains historical information and forward-looking statements within the meaning of The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 with respect to the business, financial condition and results of operations of Perion. The words "will", "believe," "expect," "intend," "plan," "should" and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Such statements reflect the current views, assumptions and expectations of Perion with respect to future events and are subject to risks and uncertainties. Many factors could cause the actual results, performance or achievements of Perion to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements that may be expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements, or financial information, including, among others, the failure to realize the anticipated benefits of companies and businesses we acquired and may acquire in the future, risks entailed in integrating the companies and businesses we acquire, including employee retention and customer acceptance; the risk that such transactions will divert management and other resources from the ongoing operations of the business or otherwise disrupt the conduct of those businesses, potential litigation associated with such transactions, and general risks associated with the business of Perion including intense and frequent changes in the markets in which the businesses operate and in general economic and business conditions, loss of key customers, unpredictable sales cycles, competitive pressures, market acceptance of new products, inability to meet efficiency and cost reduction objectives, changes in business strategy and various other factors, whether referenced or not referenced in this press release. Various other risks and uncertainties may affect Perion and its results of operations, as described in reports filed by the Company with the Securities and Exchange Commission from time to time, including its annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2015 filed with the SEC on March 24, 2016. Perion does not assume any obligation to update these forward-looking statements.


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The IAB Technology Laboratory today launched the IAB Technology Compliance Program, a system for auditing and officially validating companies’ use of critical industry standards. The program, now out of pilot phase, verifies accurate deployment of OpenRTB, VAST, and VPAID standards, and will add MRAID in the coming months. Companies that pass inspection will be given a “seal of approval,” proof to clients, partners, and the ecosystem at-large that they uphold global s


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The IAB Technology Laboratory has released for public comment an update to the Mobile Rich Media Ad Interface Definition (MRAID). The revised MRAID 3.0 provides technical guidance for improved user experience, faster ad rendering, viewability measurement, and Video Player Ad Interface Definition (VPAID) integration, among other advancements. Developed by members of the MRAID Working Group, this release marks the first major overhaul to MRAID in more than four years, a


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--IAB (Interactive Advertising Bureau), the MRC (Media Rating Council), and the MMA (Mobile Marketing Association), with the expert technical support of the IAB Technology Laboratory, have released major overhauls to the Mobile In-App Measurement and Mobile Web Measurement Guidelines for public comment—changes that will promote improved digital advertising measurement. The revised guidelines will shift both mobile in-app and mobile web from a “count-on-download” minimum to a “count-on-begin-to-render” ad impression measurement minimum. References to “served” impressions have been removed from the proposed guidelines, substituting them with the concept of counting event-driven impressions which have a greater potential for an “opportunity-to-see” by an end user. The change will better align measurement of these impressions with the counting model in place for viewable impressions. Simultaneous to this release, IAB and MRC, with the assistance of the IAB Tech Lab, have also introduced a proposed revision to the Desktop Display Served Impression Guideline, shifting desktop digital ad measurement away from a minimum of “count-on-ad-insertion” approach to a “count-on-begin-to-render” model. With this move, mobile and desktop measurement will be more closely in sync with digital video measurement, which already requires “count-on-begin-to-render.” “A ‘count-on-begin-to-render’ model is going to offer publishers improved measurement,” said Anna Bager, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Mobile and Video, IAB. “These updates will be critical in delivering the efficiencies that marketers and agencies seek from digital campaigns. They move measurement to more closely align with other measurement metrics, such as viewable impressions—providing an avenue to more cohesive cross-platform measurement.” "These updated guidelines will serve as a foundation for better digital measurement," said Alanna Gombert, Senior Vice President, Technology and Ad Operations, IAB. "This shift requires complex technical underpinnings, but will ultimately provide an easy route for simplifying and unifying ad measurement across interactive screens." “Revising these guidelines represents the initial step of what we plan to be an ongoing process to modernize existing IAB and IAB/MMA/MRC Measurement Guidelines to be fully appropriate to today’s digital advertising environment,” said George W. Ivie, Executive Director and CEO, MRC. “We thank the members of the Modernizing Measurement Task Force for their consideration and feedback as we drafted these revisions, and the IAB and the MMA for their partnership in these efforts.” “Increased answerability in measurement is vital to the growth of mobile advertising,” said Sheryl Daija, Chief Strategy Officer, MMA. “Revising the mobile measurement guidelines with the IAB and MRC will ensure that brand marketers have even better and more stringent metrics when it comes to calculating success.” The public comment period for all three guidelines will remain open until February 1, 2017, after which the MRC will consider relevant feedback and make changes to the draft as deemed appropriate. Proposed final documents will then be shared with IAB, the Modernizing Measurement Task Force—and MMA for the two mobile guidelines—for a final review prior to issuance. Comments can be emailed to Ron Pinelli of MRC at rpinelli@mediaratingcouncil.org. The revised Mobile In-App Measurement Guidelines and Mobile Web Measurement Guidelines are the result of collaboration with the Modernizing Measurement Task Force, which included representation of both buyers and sellers, as well as other interested members. They are available for download at www.mediaratingcouncil.org. The Desktop Display Served Impression Measurement Guideline was also developed in conjunction with the Modernizing Measurement Task Force and can be viewed here. The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) empowers the media and marketing industries to thrive in the digital economy. It is comprised of more than 650 leading media and technology companies that are responsible for selling, delivering, and optimizing digital advertising or marketing campaigns. Together, they account for 86 percent of online advertising in the United States. Working with its member companies, the IAB develops technical standards and best practices and fields critical research on interactive advertising, while also educating brands, agencies, and the wider business community on the importance of digital marketing. The organization is committed to professional development and elevating the knowledge, skills, expertise, and diversity of the workforce across the industry. Through the work of its public policy office in Washington, D.C., the IAB advocates for its members and promotes the value of the interactive advertising industry to legislators and policymakers. Founded in 1996, the IAB is headquartered in New York City and has a West Coast office in San Francisco. The Media Rating Council is a non-profit industry association established in 1963 comprised of leading television, radio, print and digital media companies, as well as advertisers, advertising agencies and trade associations, whose goal is to ensure measurement services that are valid, reliable and effective. Measurement services desiring MRC accreditation are required to disclose to their customers all methodological aspects of their service; comply with the MRC Minimum Standards for Media Rating Research as well as other applicable industry measurement guidelines; and submit to MRC-designed audits to authenticate and illuminate their procedures. In addition, the MRC membership actively pursues research issues they consider priorities in an effort to improve the quality of research in the marketplace. Currently approximately 110 research products are audited by the MRC. Additional information about MRC can be found at www.mediaratingcouncil.org. The MMA is the world’s leading global non-profit trade mobile marketing association comprised of more than 800 member companies, from nearly fifty countries around the world. Our members hail from every faction of the mobile marketing ecosystem, including brand marketers, agencies, mobile technology platforms, media companies, operators and others. The MMA’s mission is to accelerate the transformation and innovation of marketing through mobile, driving business growth with closer and stronger consumer engagement. Anchoring the MMA’s mission are four core pillars; to cultivate inspiration by driving innovation for the Chief Marketing Officer; to build the mobile marketing capabilities for marketing organizations through fostering know-how and confidence; to champion the effectiveness and impact of mobile through research providing tangible ROI measurement; and to advocate for mobile marketers. Additionally, MMA industry-wide committees work collaboratively to develop and advocate global best practices and lead standards development.


News Article | July 3, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

A massive gray reflector now lies between the hills of Pingtang County as China on July 3, Sunday, hoisted its finishing touches on the world's largest radio telescope after five years of construction. Like a highly sensitive ear, the radio telescope known as Five-Hundred-Meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) is designed to eavesdrop on white noise in the universe and detect any potential presence of alien life. On Sunday morning, the last of the 4,450 triangular panels was fitted into the center of the telescope's big dish, which is roughly the size of 30 football fields. The dish has a diameter of 500 yards (457 meters). The $180-million FAST project was first conceived in 1994 and its construction began in March 2011. Wang Qiming, the project's chief technologist, says most of the materials used were made domestically. Among the seven FAST receivers, five were from China while two were co-produced by Chinese, American and Australian developers. The radio telescope was finished two months ahead of schedule. This was a monumental step for FAST's planned launch in September this year. A crowd of 300 people, including developers, builders, and reporters, witnessed the feat on Sunday. Liu Cixin, a prominent science fiction writer who witnessed the installation, believes the telescope can help humans explore the universe and extraterrestrial civilizations. "I hope scientists can make epoch-making discoveries," adds Liu, who is a recipient of the 2015 Hugo Award for Best Novel. Deputy Head Zheng Xiaonian of the National Astronomical Observation (NAO) says scientists will start debugging and trial observation of FAST months before the launch. NAO is under the Chinese Academy of Sciences, which constructed the radio telescope. Zheng says FAST can potentially reach more strange objects to better understand the universe's origins and boost the hunt for alien life. He believes the radio telescope will become the global leader in the next 10 to 20 years. After FAST's launch, it will go through further adjustment. For a year or two, Chinese scientists will use the radio telescope for early-stage research. Afterwards, FAST will then be open to astronomers all over the world, says Peng Bo, the director of the NAO Radio Astronomy Technology Laboratory. Peng says experts can perform observations in other cities such as Beijing, located about 2,000 kilometers (1,242 miles) away from the telescope. As soon as it is launched, FAST will dwarf the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, which has a diameter of 300 meters (328 yards). Peng says FAST will also be 10 times more sensitive than the 100-meter (109 yards) steerable telescope in Germany. © 2016 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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