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Silver Spring, MD, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.98K | Year: 2003

73106S03-I In the United States, the annual amount of electricity used for lighting residential and commercial buildings is equal to approximately 20% of the total power generated. Widespread use of white LEDs would reduce the overall electrical demand for lighting by 50%. At this time, the major hurdle for solid-state lighting is the high cost of GaN-based LED production. This project will demonstrate a novel, substantially-reduced-cost technology for the fabrication of group-III nitride epitaxial structures for white LEDs. This novel technology is based on hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), a low-cost method for producing thick quasi-bulk GaN materials, GaN-on-sapphire, and AlN-on-sapphire templates used as substrates for device fabrication. Phase I will extend the epitaxial technology for the fabrication of Al(In)GaN-based LED devices in lighting applications. General lighting devices will be fabricated by packaging blue or UV LEDs with a white light conversion phosphor blend. Phase II will focus on the development of cost-effective technology for the production of multi-wafer blue, UV, and white-light LEDs. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits as described by awardee: The technology should dramatically lower overall device cost and enhance device and component development. White-light LEDs are needed for lighting in residential and commercial buildings, task lighting, aviation signals, and hazard indicators; UV LEDs are needed for biochemical agent detection and/or eradication; and blue LEDs have found a market in full-color displays, back lighting, and indicator lights.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2006

TDI proposes to develop innovative cost-effective manufacturing technology for thick (>200 microns) low defect GaN and AlN epitaxial materials on large area substrates. Proposed technical approach is based on hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The HVPE technology is known to produce GaN epitaxial layers with low defect density and high carrier mobility. Recently, TDI has demonstrated world first 6-inch GaN epitaxy. These results open an opportunity to develop novel technology of low defect thick GaN and AlN materials on large area substrates. The Phase II research program will be focused on defect and stress control in thick crack free AlN and GaN layers. The development involves investigation of deposition process and detailed material characteristics of thick GaN and AlN layers grown on large area substrates by HVPE.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.95K | Year: 2004

73106-In the United States, the amount of electricity used annually for lighting residential and commercial buildings is equal to approximately 20% of the total power generated. Widespread use of white LEDs would reduce the overall electrical demand for lighting by 50%. At this time, the major hurdle for solid-state lighting is the high cost of GaN-based LED production technology. This project will develop a novel epitaxial technology with substantially reduced process cost for the fabrication of group-III nitride epitaxial structures for white LEDs. This novel technology is based on hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), a low-cost method for fabricating thick quasi-bulk GaN materials, GaN-on-sapphire, and AlN-on-sapphire templates used as substrates for device fabrication. Phase I demonstrated that the technology could be used to cost-effectively fabricate AlGaN-based structures and package violet, ultraviolet, and white LED lamps for lighting application. White LED lamps were assembled by packaging the violet LEDs with a white light conversion phosphor blend. Phase II will focus develop cost effective HVPE manufacturing technology for multi-wafer, Al(In)GaN-based structures production. The efficiencies of violet, UV and white LED lamps will be improved, with brightnesses up to 100 Lm/W anticipated. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits as described by awardee: The low cost and high throughput of HVPE should dramatically lower overall device cost and enhance device and component development. White-light LEDs are needed for wide variety of applications including commercial, residential and building lighting, task lighting, aviation, and hazard indicators. UV LEDs are needed for biochemical agent detection and/or eradication systems. Blue-violet LEDs already have found a market in full-color displays, back lighting, and indicator lights.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.00K | Year: 2004

Historically, hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) was the first technique to produce high quality thick GaN epitaxial layers. Resent progress in growing of multi-layer structure by HVPE in TDI make it possible to develop this technique to fabricate multi-layer GaN- AlxGa1-xN and AlxGa1-xN -AlyGa1-yN heterostructures for light emitting diodes (LEDs) in UV spectral range with operating wavelength up to 280 nm. Additionally, TDI is going to clarify possibility to growth AlGaN-based structure capable of 230 nm light emission. Currently, only metal organic vapor phase deposition is employed to III-V nitride devices production including light emitters and high-power microwave devices. HVPE is another epitaxial method known to deposit high quality GaN layers and AlGaN-GaN heterostructures. Recently, we demonstrated multilayer AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN p-n structures grown by this method on SiC substrates. Operated wavelength under current injection was varied from 340 to 350 nm. The results obtained give us opportunity to develop a new method of the AlGaN materials growth on sapphire substrates based on HVPE technology. Phase I objective is to prove the concept and demonstrate GaN-AlGaN structures grown on 2 inch sapphire by HVPE and suitable for UV LEDs fabrication. In the Phase II TDI will focus on the development of manufacturing technology for UV LED's.


Grant
Agency: Department of Commerce | Branch: National Institute of Standards and Technology | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 75.00K | Year: 2004

TDI proposes to produce combinatorial GaN and AlGaN samples library having a wide range of doping and fabricated using a variety of surface treatment conditions. These samples will be grown using novel technological approach based on advanced hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). This method is known to produce bulk GaN materials with low defect density. Recently, TDI has demonstrated high throughput HVPE growth for both (1) doped GaN and AlGaN layers and (2) undoped layers with record low background impurity concentrations. These results opened an opportunity to develop GaN and AlGaN samples library to optimize material sheet resistivity and minimize ohmic contact resistivity using a multi-parameter space experiments. Phase I project is focused on HVPE growth of n-type and p-type samples having wide doping range and investigation of several metallization schemes for ohmic contact fabrication. Unique ability of HVPE to control defect formation in grown layers will allow us to investigate defect influence on sheet resistivity and contact resistance. The main goal of the Phase I is to prove the concept and demonstrate p- and n-type GaN and AlGaN materials with continues and discrete variation in sheet resistivity. Novel sample preparation schemes allowing combinatorial experiments on samples produced under the same conditions are proposed. Doping in grown layers will be varied from 5x1015 to 1x1020 cm-3. Fabricated samples will be delivered to NIST for testing and evaluation. COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS: Optimization of ohmic contacts for GaN and AlGaN materials is very important for design, development and commercialization of a variety of GaN-based devices for both electronic and optoelectronic applications. Thermally stable low-resistance ohmic contacts to n- and p-type GaN and AlGaN materials will find a host of applications for GaN-based devices and will leverage commercialization of advanced devices such as blue and ultra-violet laser diodes and high power high frequency transistors. Tremendous commercial potential is projected for solid-state lighting devices, which also require low-resistivity ohmic contact to GaN and AlGaN materials.

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