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Tolosa A.,Technological Institute of Optics | Martinez-Cuenca R.,Jaume I University | Navarro H.,University of Valencia | Saavedra G.,University of Valencia | And 3 more authors.
Optics Express | Year: 2014

A common drawback in 3D integral imaging displays is the appearance of pseudoimages beyond the viewing angle. These pseudoimages appear when the light rays coming from each elemental image are not passing through the corresponding microlens, and a set of barriers must be used to avoid this flipping effect. We present a pure optical arrangement based on Köhler illumination to generate these barriers thus avoiding the pseudoimages. The proposed system does not use additional lenses to project the elemental images, so no optical aberrations are introduced. As an added benefit, Köhler illumination provides a higher contrast 3D display. ©2014 Optical Society of America Source


Tolosa A.,Technological Institute of Optics | Navarro H.,University of Valencia | Saavedra G.,University of Valencia | Martinez-Corral M.,University of Valencia | And 4 more authors.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2015

Usual problem in 3D integral-imaging monitors is flipping that happens when the microimages are seen from neighbor microlenses. This effect appears when, at high viewing angles, the light rays emitted by any elemental image are not passing through the corresponding microlens. A usual solution of this problem is to insert and a set of physical barriers to avoid this crosstalk. In this contribution we present a pure optical alternative of physical barriers. Our arrangement is based on Köhler illumination concept, and avoids that the rays emitted by one microimage to impinge the neighbor microlens. The proposed system does not use additional lenses to project the elemental images, so no optical aberrations are introduced. © 2015 SPIE. Source


Alcon N.,Technological Institute of Optics | Tolosa A.,Technological Institute of Optics | Pico M.,Technological Institute of Optics | Inigo I.,Technological Institute of Optics
Color Research and Application | Year: 2011

We present a comparison between the methods used by two regulatory standards to estimate the luminance decay time for photoluminescent safety signs and safety way guidance systems (SWGS). One of these standards is the international ISO 16069. The other is the Spanish regulatory standard UNE 23035-1. Both standards define the luminance decay time as the time for the luminance emitted by the photoluminescent sample to reach 0.3 mcd/m 2 after the excitation light over the sample is removed. Due to the fact that decay time can be really long, they propose methods to estimate it by extrapolation. The points suggested by each standard to adjust the luminance decay time curve are quite different and so are the results obtained with them. To compare both methods, four different photoluminescent safety signs were tested using the methods provided by these two regulatory standards. The samples were illuminated for 5 min with a xenon-arc source of light; luminance measurements after illumination were made with a B-510 LMT photometer, for an interval of time according to methods explained by the standards. The results were compared with real measurements of luminance decay time for each sample, allowing the luminance value to reach 0.3 mcd/m 2. Results obtained from the extrapolating methods provided by each standard showed that standard ISO 16069 was much more accurate than UNE 23035-1, which showed important deviations from real decay time values. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Col Res Appl, 2011 Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source

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