Technological Education Institution of Macedonia Florina

Flórina, Greece

Technological Education Institution of Macedonia Florina

Flórina, Greece

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Lazaridou T.,Technological Education Institution of Macedonia Florina | Lithourgidis A.,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | Kotzamanidis S.,Greek National Agricultural Research Foundation | Sistanis I.,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | Roupakias D.,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Australian Journal of Crop Science | Year: 2013

This study was undertaken to compare doubled haploid (DH) lines produced from high yielding F3 barley plants selected at two plant densities {i.e., 1.15 plants m-2 (PD1) and 4.61 plants m-2 (PD2)} for two generations (F2 and F3) to the F6 lines produced from the same cross (Niki × Karina) after phenotypic pedigree selection for five generations. These lines were evaluated for three years at farmers' plant density. During the first season (2005-2006) 178 F6 and 17 DH lines were evaluated in rows using adjacent control. The two parents (Niki and Karina) of the F1 barley cross were used as controls. Mid- parent heterosis (MP) (% yield as compared to the mean of the two controls) was estimated, and finally 26 pedigree and 6 DH lines exhibiting 45% and 26% or higher MP heterosis, respectively, were selected. In the next growing season (2006-2007) a randomized complete block design was established to evaluate these lines. From the 32 genotypes studied the 29 were superior to the mean of the two parents in grain yield, whereas 18 of them (i.e. 10 from PD1, 5 from PD2 and 3 DH lines) exhibited 30% or higher MP heterosis. These 18 genotypes were further evaluated during the third growing season (2007-2008). Finally 9 lines (i.e. 4 PD1, 3 PD2, and 2 DH) yielded significantly higher than both of the controls. However, four advanced pedigree lines (2 PD1 and 2PD2) yielded significantly higher than the best DH line. It was concluded that a combination of honeycomb early generation selection for two generations (F2 and F3) and the production of DH lines from high yielding F3 plants could be considered as a beneficial alternative approach only in the case where a comparable number of DH lines are produced and evaluated.


Vlachostergios D.,Greek National Agricultural Research Foundation | Lithourgidis A.,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | Korkovelos A.,University of Thessaly | Baxevanos D.,Greek National Agricultural Research Foundation | And 3 more authors.
Australian Journal of Crop Science | Year: 2011

An alternative way to overcome the negative environmental fluctuations observed in low-input culture systems is to compose and utilize cultivar mixtures. However, the available genetic materials to compose such mixtures are cultivars developed by conventional breeding programs with questionable adaptability under low-inputs. The aim of this work was to investigate the mixing ability of conventionally bred common vetch cultivars for grain yield under low-input cultivation. Six common vetch cultivar mixtures were evaluated over their conventionally bred cultivar components for grain yield under low-input cultivation in four environments (2007-2009). Grain yield and stability performance were assessed for each entry. Mixture effect was calculated as an index for the quantitative relation between the mixture and its conventionally bred cultivar components. ANOVA and GGE-biplot analysis indicated that four out of six mixtures over-yielded the average of the experiment and the most cultivar pure stands. Two of the mixtures illustrated high yield, stability across environments and positive Mixture Effect in three out of four environments and could be recommended for low-input cultivation. Earliness and temporal maturing of common vetch cultivar components were recognized as major factors affecting mixture's grain yield and stability performance and should be taken into account when composing common vetch cultivar mixtures for grain yield.


Lazaridou T.,Technological Education Institution of Macedonia Florina | Sistanis I.,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | Lithourgidis A.,Technological Education Institution of Macedonia Florina | Lithourgidis A.,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | And 2 more authors.
Australian Journal of Crop Science | Year: 2011

The in-vitro culture response of anthers, originating from progeny of high and low yielding F2 barley plants selected under low (honeycomb pedigree) and high (conventional pedigree) plant density, was investigated. Young spikes were collected and after 28 days at 4° C for cold pre-treatment, the anthers were cultured in FHG solid medium. Progeny from 60 different F2 families were used and 39 of them responded to in-vitro anther culture, whereas only 15 families produced green plants. From the green plants produced, 1.90 plants per 100 anthers originated from the high yielding F2 plants selected at low plant density, and similar green plant production (1.65 plants per 100 anthers) originated from the high yielding plants selected at high plant density. However, only 0.07% green plants were produced from anthers originating from low yielding F2 plants selected at high plant density. In addition, 72.7% of green plants were fertile and produced seeds. The 67% of the families that produced green plants originated from the high yielding F2 plants, no matter whether they were selected under high or low plant density. From the families that produced green plants, anthers originating from the high yielding families produced more green plants per 100 anthers that the low yielding ones. In conclusion, there is a positive correlation between the yielding capacity of the lines and the anther culture response. Therefore someone must be concentrated on high yielding plants and avoid the low yielding ones to produce doubled haploids.

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