Beltsville, MD, United States

Techno-Sciences, Inc.

www.technosci.com
Beltsville, MD, United States

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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.96K | Year: 2012

A tube launched micromunition with the ability to reconfigure to hover and perform surveillance would provide significant advantages to the warfighter in an urban environment. A rotor based system with the capability to autorotate is an effective way for the system to hover and perform maneuvers over a designated area. Such a system provides a stationary platform for sensors and cameras for surveillance along with the maneuvering capability if needed.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.83K | Year: 2013

The primary goal of this STTR program is to develop high fidelity LDLP software module that can predict stiffness and damping forces over the ranges of amplitude, frequency, and temperature appropriate for comprehensive modeling of helicopters. The LDLP module will focus on enabling accurate prediction of the onset of both air and ground resonance, as well as the fatigue loads that would arise due to the implementation of such lag dampers, and the impact of fatigue on the Remaining Useful Life (RUL) of rotor and rotor hub components. This project will develop a software module that provides the capability to predict lag damper behavior, especially the stiffness and damping forces that arise from lag dampers of varying configuration, material choices, fluid properties, and feedback control strategies in the case of semi-active or active lag damper technologies. The project team will construct an LDLP software module that will be configured to interface with any existing comprehensive rotorcraft analysis code, such as the University of Maryland Advanced rotorcraft Code (UMARC), Copter (Bells comprehensive rotor code), CAMRAD II (Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics), and GenHel (Sikorskys General Helicopter Flight Dynamic Simulation Model).


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.99K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: Traditional military aircraft design has been based on peak power and peak thermal loads. With the introduction of more-electric aircraft, increasing requirements for on-demand high-quality power for flight controls and electro-mechanical actuation devices will pose further challenges for energy efficiency and mission capability. Therefore, there is a new and pressing need for dynamic optimization for energy management of more-electric aircraft. Techno-Sciences, Inc. proposes a control system development based of hybrid systems theory. The effort will result in the construction of an expressive framework to pose the pertinent issues for energy management in aircraft systems, creation of optimization metrics, implementation of necessary computational tools and initial verification through simulation. We emphasize the wide applicability of the hybrid control architecture and the design software to a range of defense and commercial users. The effort is particularly of interest to the next generation of more-electric military aircrafts. BENEFIT: The primary application is to utilize hybrid controllers for energy management and optimization in more-electric fighter airframes across multiple mission segments. This technology will enable better energy efficiency across multiple subsystems and improved range while aircraft still meets performance requirements without compromising the existing capabilities. In the commercial sector, similar advances are required for more-electric aircrafts to be efficient and dependable. Aircraft manufacturers, avionic system integrators and engine manufacturers are interested in technologies that will provide better fuel economy and improved range for next generation of aircrafts.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.97K | Year: 2013

Fuel is the second-highest battlefield throughput commodity behind water. In fact, ~65% of the fuel consumed in the theatre is for fuel transportation to the battlefield. To improve the fuel consumption and the quantity of forward-deployed fuel, Techno-Sciences, Inc. (TSi) proposes innovative, open architecture software that implements optimal hybrid control algorithms for intelligent power management of ground combat vehicles with anti-idling technology (Hybrid Intelligent Power Controller HIPCo). HIPCo will target the no-idle requirements, while increasing battery life and improving fleet efficiency. HIPCo will also reduce fuel consumption by at least 10%. In the battlefield, another advantage of HIPCo will be during silent watch by reducing exhaust emissions, noise and thermal signatures.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.94K | Year: 2012

Several military helicopters feature forward firing weapons, which have simple and reliable mounts, but require the pilot to precisely point the aircraft at an intended target. Depending on the combat environment, this can place a significant burden on the pilots and often results in lowered aiming accuracy and increased potential for collateral damage. There are existing technologies that have been proven to operate well for precision weapon pointing, but these gimbal systems are prohibitively heavy for forward firing weapon applications. As such, Techno-Sciences, Inc., in collaboration with the University of Maryland, proposes to develop a technology with small-deflection precision pointing and adaptive recoil capabilities to increase the precision of forward firing weapons. The pointing accuracy will be achieved with pneumatic artificial muscle actuators and the adaptive recoil will be achieved with magnetorheological fluid dampers. Building upon our extensive experience and related patent portfolio, we will perform analyses and detailed design work in Phase I of the project. Phase II will be focused on further refinements and integration into functional hardware capable of demonstrations.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.98K | Year: 2012

Solar shading is a cost-effective solution in expeditionary shelters for reducing fuel consumption for climate control. Current solar shades are known to typically fail by fabric tearing in the degraded material after one year of use. This short service life is dramatically less than that of shelters, supplies, and equipment that the shade is expected to cover. The proposed work is to develop a next generation multifunctional shade material with enhanced durability and other advantageous attributes. The proposed shade material consists of plasmonic nanowires dispersed in a polymer that offers enhanced elastic modulus and strength, and superior solar blockage.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 599.84K | Year: 2012

The primary goal of this project is to develop a set of design tools for the development of next generation power and load management strategies and devices to integrate distributed generation and load management into modern vehicle power systems. It is intended to facilitate design and operation of power systems with distributed resources, integrating multiple generation alternatives, accommodating all operational modes and load demands and even component failures. The proposed power management systems will enable efficient, optimal and fault tolerant operation with appropriate cost-benefit tradeoffs and provide a secure information gateway to enable flexibility and adaptability to changing operational needs. We also propose to consider new distribution system topologies and new protection/isolation strategies to enhance overall stability and reliability The proposed effort is based on a new analysis and design technology that enables inclusion of both discrete and dynamical components (allowing incorporation of widely ranging time scales in modern Shipboard Power Systems) which enables the design of controllers that respond to discrete events such as operational mode change, load level of a component/subsystem or availability of generation resource, while respecting the inherent dynamic constraints of the system. The methodology and computer tools we propose will not only enable the design of new distribution system topologies and strategies for the system operators but also controllers capable of autonomous action if the time scale of the situation requires it. These basic ideas and some of the associated computational tools have been previously developed by Techno-Sciences, Inc. under contracts and grants from ONR, DOE, NAVSEA and NASA. In the Phase I effort we have developed a concept of operation, developed an optimization scenario and demonstrated the results on a developed benchmark simulation of the DDG 51 architecture with a Hybrid Electric Drive to demonstrate how the tools will be used in a prototype form. All pertinent component models were created and implemented in the proposed framework. We have also created the operational interface and data-logging tools to achieve a first level of validation. In the Phase I option effort, we can achieve limited hardware in the loop testing and In Phase II, we expect to expand the design tools for such a class of systems. We will also transition the tools to first level of verification to low power hardware in the loop tests and begin the transition to a land based test facility for more significant testing by the end of Phase II performance period. The software will be modular and easily extensible to accommodate the requirements of supervision and reconfiguration of such power systems.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.99K | Year: 2012

High technology small business Techno-Sciences, Inc. in partnership with Submarine Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (SEPIRB) manufacturer Ultra Electronic Ocean Systems Inc. proposes the development of next generation, self powered SEPIRB. Many innovations in the design of the beacon and powering are proposed including improved hardware, various software configurations appropriate for the next generation COSPAS-SARSAT system, as well as, a unique set of energy harvesting mechanisms that will help the device achieve long shelf life. The beacon will be easy to maintain and can be deployed using standard operating procedures. In Phase I, low power electronic beacon board was manufactured and tested and energy harvesting solutions were investigated. Phase II focuses on development of prototypes and initial testing. Later phases will involve launch testing and integration into the fleet.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.95K | Year: 2012

Data analysis and sensor fusion is undeniably the most pertinent part of science and practical applications related to information management for damage detection and condition monitoring. Unfortunately, for a general solution to be tractable for coupled, distributed systems, such as shipboard auxiliary systems, sensor fusion requires innovative techniques and algorithms. The ultimate goal for the proposed sensor fusion is to address the problem of damage detection in the auxiliary systems, to improve situational awareness, and to formulate appropriate control actions. Our technique combines a statistical signal processing approach based on Hidden Markov Modeling with nonlinear estimation theory developed for complex distributed systems. Fusion of data from multiple sources will lead to managing the information regarding sensor features simultaneously. We aim to achieve a reliable and computationally inexpensive sensor fusion technology targeted for shipboard auxiliary systems.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.88K | Year: 2011

Rotors and their associated dynamic components operate in high-cycle and environmentally harsh conditions. Accurate rotor load predictions are crucial part of rotor analysis and design. Lag damping poses a challenge for rotor load analysis due to the difficulty of incorporating lag damper effects into comprehensive rotor analysis. The key challenge in effectively predicting the lead-lag motions and resulting rotor loads is the lack of a high fidelity lag damper model. A high fidelity lag damper model that can predict damping forces over the operational range of a helicopter will benefit future rotor designs.

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