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Pikesville, MD, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 98.52K | Year: 1996

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Grant
Agency: Department of Homeland Security | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 77.93K | Year: 2004

A threat to Homeland Security is the distribution or release of toxic materials (e.g., toxic industrial chemicals) as a means to disrupt society and affect the general health of the population. If additionally these toxic materials have a low vapor pressure, they are hard to detect with traditional chemical point detectors. To thwart this threat, the chemicals are being classified into threat categories, scientific data collected on chemical signatures, technologies suitable as detector technologies identified, and recommendations made for future research and development.


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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Office for Chemical and Biological Defense | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 69.96K | Year: 2000

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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 375.00K | Year: 1997

The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) continues to constitute a serious threat to the security of the United States. Early detection and warning of the use of the WMD on the battlefield is a top priority of the Department of Defense. Likewise, the identification and characterization of WMD facilities and capabilities worldwide comprise critical elements of United States endeavors to counter their proliferation. These national security thrusts, both battlefield defense and intelligence gathering, require the detection of chemical and biological agents, as well as precursors and by-products in their production. Also, other health related issues arising from the Persian Gulf War underscore the need to detect and identify other hazardous and toxic materials in the theater. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is proving to be a very effective technology to detect targeted compounds in the battlefield and other sensitive scenarios. The Chemical Agent Monitor (CAM) has already been deployed as a handheld IMS detector. The combination of gas chromatography (GC) with IMS, however, should provide an improved detection capability over CAM which can be plagued with disabling interferences in certain scenarios. This proposal addresses the design of a miniaturized GC-IMS which promises to significantly reduce the size, weight and power of the device without compromising performance.

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