Lyngby, Denmark

The Technical University of Denmark , often simply referred to as DTU, is a university in Kongens Lyngby, just north of Copenhagen, Denmark. It was founded in 1829 at the initiative of Hans Christian Ørsted as Denmark's first polytechnic, and is today ranked among Europe's leading engineering institutions, and the best engineering university in the Nordic countries. Wikipedia.


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The present invention relates to preparation of a polymer coating comprising or consisting of polymer chains comprising or consisting of units of 2-methoxyethyl acrylate synthesized by Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SIATRP) such as ARGET SIATRP or AGET SIATRP and uses of said polymer coating.


Patent
Technical University of Denmark | Date: 2015-04-16

The present invention relates to a new strategy for capturing NO_(x )using a two-step process.


Patent
Technical University of Denmark | Date: 2015-04-08

Disclosed herein is a method for producing a zeolite, zeolite-like or zeotype structure with selective formation of metal, metal oxide or metal sulphide nanoparticles and/or clusters inside the zeolite, zeolite-like or zeotype structure.


Patent
Technical University of Denmark | Date: 2015-04-16

The present invention relates e.g. to methods of producing statins in transgenic, non-filamentous microorganisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, the present invention relates to the transgenic, non-filamentous microorganisms as such as well as various uses of transmembrane statin efflux pump(s) originating from various filamentous fungi. Moreover, the present invention relates to the transferring the compactin, lovastatin or monacolin K gene cluster originating from non-filamentous fungi into easily fermentable microorganisms, followed by expression or overexpression of the efflux pump encoding genes in said microorganisms in order to increase the microorganisms resistance to statins which in turn allows for production of elevated concentrations of natural statins compared to statin-producing methods known in the art.


Patent
Technical University of Denmark | Date: 2015-04-14

The present invention relates to a resonant DC-DC power converter assembly comprising a first resonant DC-DC power converter and a second resonant DC-DC power converter having identical circuit topologies. A first inductor of the first resonant DC-DC power converter and a second inductor of the second resonant DC-DC power converter are configured for magnetically coupling the first and second resonant DC-DC power converters to each other to forcing substantially 180 degrees phase shift, or forcing substantially 0 degree phase shift, between corresponding resonant voltage waveforms of the first and second resonant DC-DC power converters. The first and second inductors are corresponding components of the first and second resonant DC-DC power converters.


Patent
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham, Women's Hospital, Childrens Medical Center Corporation and Technical University of Denmark | Date: 2016-10-20

The present invention is based, in part, on the identification of novel methods for defining predictive biomarkers of response to anti-cancer drugs.


Patent
Technical University of Denmark | Date: 2015-04-07

The invention relates to a VCSEL structure based on a novel grating reflector. The grating reflector (1) comprises a grating layer (20) with a contiguous core grating region having a grating structure, wherein an index of refraction of high-index sections (21) of the grating structure is at least 2.5, and wherein an index of refraction of low-index sections (22) of the grating structure is less than 2. The core grating region defines a projection in a direction normal to the grating layer. The grating reflector further comprises a cap layer (30) abutting the grating layer (20), and an index of refraction of the cap layer within the projection of the core grating region onto the cap layer is at least 2.5, and within the projection of the core grating region, the cap layer is abutted by a first solid dielectric low-index layer, an index of refraction of the first low-index layer or air being less than 2; and within the projection of the core grating region, the grating layer is also abutted by a second low-index layer and/or by air, an index of refraction of the second low-index layer or air being less than 2. The VCSEL structure furthermore comprises a first reflector and an active region for providing a cavity and amplification. The cap layer (30) may comprise an active layer (32) between cladding layers (31,33) and electrical contacts (35,36) to provide a current through the active layer. Current confinement may be realized by low-index oxide regions (60).


Patent
Technical University of Denmark | Date: 2017-02-15

The invention relates to a guide blade (1) for an overflow structure (100) to be placed on a vessel, the guide blade comprising a primary contact surface (4) for guiding a stream of a water mixture into an overflow structure and a secondary contact surface (5) being a backside of the primary contact surface (4), the primary contact surface having an edge (2) configured for abutting an overflow structure (100) and at least one free edge, wherein the guide blade is configured for being attachable to a unit to be arrange on or in an inlet (109) of an overflow structure or directly on or in an inlet (109) of an overflow structure by means of one or more fastening elements or by welding. The invention further relates to an overflow system comprising one or more guide blades and an overflow structure. The invention further relates to a method of guiding a stream of a watery mixture approaching and/or entering an overflow structure by means of one or more guide blades.


A security scanning system (1) comprises a first stage module (3) and a second stage module (11). In the second stage, a group of carry-on items (4) determined in the first stage to have at least one local area (27) requiring further scanning is further scanned. The group of carry-on items and a X-ray source and a focusing device are mutually positioned so that a measuring position (25) is in line with the local area requiring further scanning, and the X-ray source emits photons in a polychromatic X-ray beam, which photons are focussed towards the measuring position by the focusing device (24), and at least one second detector (22) detects diffracted X-rays from the local area.


A security scanning system (1) comprises a first stage module (3) having at least one X-ray source (6) and at least three first detectors (7) that are line-shaped and arranged in mutually different orientations and have at least dual energy resolution. A group of carry-on items (4) on a carrier are scanned simultaneously in the first stage module solely by transmission contrast radiography generating projections of two-dimensional image data. A processing device (9) reconstructs a 3D representation of the carry-on items and analyzes the 3D representation to determine whether further scanning is required.


Patent
Technical University of Denmark | Date: 2017-01-18

The present invention relates to a method for minimizing noise in a laser system, the laser system having two, or more, separate contacts for independently controlling currents to different sections of a diode laser; the method comprising the following steps:- determining noise in an emission of the laser system;- comparing the noise to a threshold value;- if the noise is above the threshold value, adjusting a current supplied to a first contact of said two or more separate contacts until the noise is below the threshold value,- if the noise is above the threshold value and the current supplied to said first contact is at a lowest current threshold level, adjusting the current supplied to a second contact of the two or more separate contacts.


A novel system concept is presented for the thermochemical conversion of very wet biomasses such as sewage sludge and manure. The system integrates steam drying, solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) and gasification for the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG). The system is analyzed by thermodynamic modelling and the analysis shows that the system can handle mechanically dried biomasses with a water content of 70 wt% and an ash content of up to 50 wt% (dry basis). A high tolerable ash content is an advantage because very wet biomasses, such as sewage sludge and manure, have a high ash content. The analysis shows that the total efficiency of the novel system is 69–70% depending on the biomass ash content, while the biomass to SNG energy ratio is 165%, which is near the theoretical maximum because electrolytic hydrogen is supplied to the synthesis gas. It is proposed to combine the novel system with an anaerobic digester for conversion of biomasses with high nitrogen content, such as sewage sludge. The organic nitrogen in the sewage sludge will be mineralized in the digester instead of ending up as N2 in the SNG product. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Rosbjerg D.,Technical University of Denmark
Water Resources Research | Year: 2017

More intense and frequent rainfalls have increased the number of urban flooding events in recent years, prompting adaptation efforts. Economic optimization is considered an efficient tool to decide on the design level for adaptation. The costs associated with a flooding to the T-year level and the annual capital and operational costs of adapting to this level are described with log-linear relations. The total flooding costs are developed as the expected annual damage of flooding above the T-year level plus the annual capital and operational costs for ensuring no flooding below the T-year level. The value of the return period T that corresponds to the minimum of the sum of these costs will then be the optimal adaptation level. The change in climate, however, is expected to continue in the next century, which calls for expansion of the above model. The change can be expressed in terms of a climate factor (the ratio between the future and the current design level) which is assumed to increase in time. This implies increasing costs of flooding in the future for many places in the world. The optimal adaptation level is found for immediate as well as for delayed adaptation. In these cases, the optimum is determined by considering the net present value of the incurred costs during a sufficiently long time-span. Immediate as well as delayed adaptation is considered. © 2016. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.


Davy A.M.,Technical University of Denmark | Kildegaard H.F.,Technical University of Denmark | Andersen M.R.,Technical University of Denmark
Cell Systems | Year: 2017

Rational approaches to modifying cells to make molecules of interest are of substantial economic and scientific interest. Most of these efforts aim at the production of native metabolites, expression of heterologous biosynthetic pathways, or protein expression. Reviews of these topics have largely focused on individual strategies or cell types, but collectively they fall under the broad umbrella of a growing field known as cell factory engineering. Here we condense >130 reviews and key studies in the art into a meta-review of cell factory engineering. We identified 33 generic strategies in the field, all applicable to multiple types of cells and products, and proven successful in multiple major cell types. These apply to three major categories: production of native metabolites and/or bioactives, heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways, and protein expression. This meta-review provides general strategy guides for the broad range of applications of rational engineering of cell factories. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Sorensen B.F.,Technical University of Denmark
Mechanics of Materials | Year: 2017

A shear-lag model is developed for the analysis of single fiber fragmentation tests for the characterization of the mechanical properties of the fiber/matrix interface in composite materials. The model utilizes the relation for the loss in potential energy of Budiansky, Hutchinson and Evans. The model characterizes the interface in terms of an interfacial fracture energy and a frictional sliding shear stress. Results are obtained in closed analytical form. An experimental approach is proposed for the determination of the interfacial fracture energy and the frictional shear stress from simultaneously obtained data for the applied strain, the opening of a broken fiber and the associated debond length. The residual stresses are obtained as a part of the approach and enables the determination of in-situ fiber strength. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd


Woodley J.M.,Technical University of Denmark
Computers and Chemical Engineering | Year: 2017

The further implementation of new bioprocesses, using biocatalysts in various formats, for the synthesis of chemicals is highly dependent upon effective process intensification. The need for process intensification reflects the fact that the conditions under which a biocatalyst carries out a reaction in nature are far from those which are optimal for industrial processes. In this paper the rationale for intensification will be discussed, as well as the four complementary approaches used today to achieve bioprocess intensification. Two of these four approaches are based on alteration of the biocatalyst (either by protein engineering or metabolic engineering), resulting in an extra degree of freedom in the process design. To date, biocatalyst engineering has been developed independently from the conventional process engineering methodology to intensification. Although the integration of these two methodologies has now started, in the future synergistic integration should enable many new opportunities for bioprocesses for the production of chemicals. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Visiopharm A/S announces the first result of their multifaceted strategy to apply Deep Learning technologies to its leading image analysis solution for cancer research and diagnostics. Visiopharm considers Deep Learning an important technological breakthrough for tissue pathology that offers the potential to make a real difference in the assessment of tissue structures, which is probably one of the most complex and challenging applications of image analysis. Real progress in this field requires a multi-disciplinary approach and therefore Visiopharm has established a broad multidisciplinary strategy to lead further development of Deep Learning in tissue pathology, within several important clinical and research applications. To support this strategy Visiopharm has established an International Consortium for Deep Learning in Tissue Pathology. The consortium involves Academic Medical Centers, Tissue Biobanks, Engineering Universities, Biopharmaceutical companies, and other industrial partners who all share this vision. “We are very excited about our fast progress in deep learning over the past year and Visiopharm remains committed to investing a lot more in this technology. We are currently formalizing the consortium and we look forward to continued collaborations and sharing more details on this initiative soon” says Michael Grunkin, CEO of Visiopharm. Visiopharm co-supervises several Masters Students and sponsor/co-supervises industrial PhDs in collaboration with its partners in the consortium, including the Technical University of Denmark and DTU Compute, a department we have worked closely with for many years. Early results of this effort have come from Masters Student, Jeppe Thagaard who is doing his Thesis work on Deep Learning. “We are very excited about these first results! Jeppe is only a few months into the project, and the Deep Learning algorithms developed on the Visiopharm software platform, were ranked 5th out of 23, with a marginal score difference to the winner of the CAMELYON17 competition” says CTO Johan Doré. “We look forward to a continued collaboration with Jeppe after his Thesis work, and congratulate him on his focused efforts providing such impressive results after only a few months’ work” continues CTO Johan Doré. Visiopharm plans to make advantages of this new technology available to current users of the Oncotopix® products for cancer research and diagnostics, but also to include it in new product brands on their way to market. The goal of the recent CAMELYON17 Deep Learning competition was to evaluate new and existing algorithms for automated detection and classification of breast cancer metastases in whole-slide images of histological lymph node sections, which are of high clinical relevance to pathologists. Full results and details of the CameLyon17 competition can be found at https://camelyon17.grand-challenge.org/results/.


Real progress in this field requires a multi-disciplinary approach and therefore Visiopharm has established a broad multidisciplinary strategy to lead further development of Deep Learning in tissue pathology, within several important clinical and research applications. To support this strategy Visiopharm has established an International Consortium for Deep Learning in Tissue Pathology. The consortium involves Academic Medical Centers, Tissue Biobanks, Engineering Universities, Biopharmaceutical companies, and other industrial partners who all share this vision. “We are very excited about our fast progress in deep learning over the past year and Visiopharm remains committed to investing a lot more in this technology. We are currently formalizing the consortium and we look forward to continued collaborations and sharing more details on this initiative soon,” says Michael Grunkin, CEO of Visiopharm. Visiopharm co-supervises several Masters Students and sponsor/co-supervises industrial PhDs in collaboration with its partners in the consortium, including the Technical University of Denmark and DTU Compute, a department we have worked closely with for many years. Early results of this effort have come from Masters Student, Jeppe Thagaard who is doing his Thesis work on Deep Learning. “We are very excited about these first results! Jeppe is only a few months into the project, and the Deep Learning algorithms developed on the Visiopharm software platform, were ranked 5th out of 23, with a marginal score difference to the winner of the CAMELYON17 competition,” says CTO Johan Doré. “We look forward to a continued collaboration with Jeppe after his Thesis work, and congratulate him on his focused efforts providing such impressive results after only a few months’ work,” continues CTO Johan Doré. Visiopharm plans to make advantages of this new technology available to current users of the Oncotopix® products for cancer research and diagnostics, but also to include it in new product brands on their way to market. The goal of the recent CAMELYON17 Deep Learning competition was to evaluate new and existing algorithms for automated detection and classification of breast cancer metastases in whole-slide images of histological lymph node sections, which are of high clinical relevance to pathologists. Full results and details of the CameLyon17 competition can be found at https://camelyon17.grand-challenge.org/results/.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.treehugger.com

You might not see it or even realize it, but Earth's magnetic field is vital in protecting life on the planet from the constant onslaught of harmful cosmic radiation and charged particles from the solar wind. Extending out from Earth's core like an invisible cocoon, the planet's geomagnetic field is also informed by the lithosphere (its crust and upper mantle). The layer is made up of magnetized rocks that produce a weak field that is difficult to detect, meaning that the exact details of Earth's magnetic field as a whole is probably much more complex than we might imagine. That's what researchers over at the European Space Agency (ESA) are revealing in a recent three-dimensional map of the Earth's "lithospheric magnetic field", created using data from a trio of satellites collectively known as Swarm. The result is a map that does not look uniform at all, offering new clues and more questions about how our lithosphere's magnetic field has changed over the course of geological history. As one of the team's scientists, Nils Olsen from the Technical University of Denmark, explains, this is the highest resolution map of its kind: This colour-coded model shows areas of weak magnetic activity shaded in blue, while areas of high magnetic activity are shown in red. One of the mysteries opened up by this new map is an area of sharp magnetic intensity around the city of Bangui in the Central African Republic, as seen in the video. Scientists theorize that it may be due to a meteorite crashing here over 540 million years ago. The earth's ever-changing crust -- altered through volcanic activity on land and underwater -- also provides insight into the history of the planet's dynamic magnetic field as minerals in cooling magma organize themselves according to a magnetic north that can shift over time, creating 'stripes' along the ocean floor that can be seen in the model. Dhananjay Ravat from the University of Kentucky explains: Another mystery that the scientists are pondering is why the Earth's magnetic field is weakening in certain regions. Scientists believe that Swarm's data will help us better understand natural processes that occur inside the planet, as well as conditions in outer space that are influenced by solar activity. In any case, there's plenty to unravel as the mission continues to observe and map Earth's complex and ever-shifting magnetic field. Read more over at ESA's Swarm.


News Article | April 12, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

Trees and other plants, from towering redwoods to diminutive daisies, are nature’s hydraulic pumps. They are constantly pulling water up from their roots to the topmost leaves, and pumping sugars produced by their leaves back down to the roots. This constant stream of nutrients is shuttled through a system of tissues called xylem and phloem, which are packed together in woody, parallel conduits. Now engineers at MIT and their collaborators have designed a microfluidic device they call a “tree-on-a-chip,” which mimics the pumping mechanism of trees and plants. Like its natural counterparts, the chip operates passively, requiring no moving parts or external pumps. It is able to pump water and sugars through the chip at a steady flow rate for several days. The results are published this week in Nature Plants. Anette “Peko" Hosoi, professor and associate department head for operations in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, says the chip’s passive pumping may be leveraged as a simple hydraulic actuator for small robots. Engineers have found it difficult and expensive to make tiny, movable parts and pumps to power complex movements in small robots. The team’s new pumping mechanism may enable robots whose motions are propelled by inexpensive, sugar-powered pumps. “The goal of this work is cheap complexity, like one sees in nature,” Hosoi says. “It’s easy to add another leaf or xylem channel in a tree. In small robotics, everything is hard, from manufacturing, to integration, to actuation. If we could make the building blocks that enable cheap complexity, that would be super exciting. I think these [microfluidic pumps] are a step in that direction.” Hosoi’s co-authors on the paper are lead author Jean Comtet, a former graduate student in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering; Kaare Jensen of the Technical University of Denmark; and Robert Turgeon and Abraham Stroock, both of Cornell University. The group’s tree-inspired work grew out of a project on hydraulic robots powered by pumping fluids. Hosoi was interested in designing hydraulic robots at the small scale, that could perform actions similar to much bigger robots like Boston Dynamic’s Big Dog, a four-legged, Saint Bernard-sized robot that runs and jumps over rough terrain, powered by hydraulic actuators. “For small systems, it’s often expensive to manufacture tiny moving pieces,” Hosoi says. “So we thought, ‘What if we could make a small-scale hydraulic system that could generate large pressures, with no moving parts?’ And then we asked, ‘Does anything do this in nature?’ It turns out that trees do.” The general understanding among biologists has been that water, propelled by surface tension, travels up a tree’s channels of xylem, then diffuses through a semipermeable membrane and down into channels of phloem that contain sugar and other nutrients. The more sugar there is in the phloem, the more water flows from xylem to phloem to balance out the sugar-to-water gradient, in a passive process known as osmosis. The resulting water flow flushes nutrients down to the roots. Trees and plants are thought to maintain this pumping process as more water is drawn up from their roots. “This simple model of xylem and phloem has been well-known for decades,” Hosoi says. “From a qualitative point of view, this makes sense. But when you actually run the numbers, you realize this simple model does not allow for steady flow.” In fact, engineers have previously attempted to design tree-inspired microfluidic pumps, fabricating parts that mimic xylem and phloem. But they found that these designs quickly stopped pumping within minutes. It was Hosoi’s student Comtet who identified a third essential part to a tree’s pumping system: its leaves, which produce sugars through photosynthesis. Comtet’s model includes this additional source of sugars that diffuse from the leaves into a plant’s phloem, increasing the sugar-to-water gradient, which in turn maintains a constant osmotic pressure, circulating water and nutrients continuously throughout a tree. With Comtet’s hypothesis in mind, Hosoi and her team designed their tree-on-a-chip, a microfluidic pump that mimics a tree’s xylem, phloem, and most importantly, its sugar-producing leaves. To make the chip, the researchers sandwiched together two plastic slides, through which they drilled small channels to represent xylem and phloem. They filled the xylem channel with water, and the phloem channel with water and sugar, then separated the two slides with a semipermeable material to mimic the membrane between xylem and phloem. They placed another membrane over the slide containing the phloem channel, and set a sugar cube on top to represent the additional source of sugar diffusing from a tree’s leaves into the phloem. They hooked the chip up to a tube, which fed water from a tank into the chip. With this simple setup, the chip was able to passively pump water from the tank through the chip and out into a beaker, at a constant flow rate for several days, as opposed to previous designs that only pumped for several minutes. “As soon as we put this sugar source in, we had it running for days at a steady state,” Hosoi says. “That’s exactly what we need. We want a device we can actually put in a robot.” Hosoi envisions that the tree-on-a-chip pump may be built into a small robot to produce hydraulically powered motions, without requiring active pumps or parts. “If you design your robot in a smart way, you could absolutely stick a sugar cube on it and let it go,” Hosoi says.


Patent
Technical University of Denmark | Date: 2017-01-04

The present invention relates to a resonant DC-DC power converter comprising an input side circuit comprising a positive and a negative input terminal for receipt of an input voltage or current and an output side circuit comprising positive and negative output terminals for supply of a converter output voltage and connection to a converter load. The resonant DC-DC power converter further comprises a rectification circuit connected between an output of a resonant network and the output side circuit. The resonant network is configured for alternatingly being charged from the input voltage or current and discharged through the rectification circuit by a first controllable switch arrangement in accordance with a first switch control signal. A second controllable switch arrangement of the resonant DC-DC power converter is configured to select a first impedance characteristic of the resonant network in a first switch state and select a second impedance characteristic of the resonant network in a second switch state. An output voltage or current control circuit is configured to adjust the converter output voltage and/or current by activating and interrupting the first switch control signal in accordance with the switch state of the second controllable switch arrangement.


Patent
Technical University of Denmark | Date: 2017-02-08

The present invention relates to a rotor for a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor, said rotor comprising a rotor body having a longitudinal centre axis, and at least one pivotally mounted blade being adapted to pivot around a pivot axis under rotation of the rotor body around the longitudinal centre axis. Moreover, the present invention relates to a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor applying such a rotor.


Patent
Technical University of Denmark | Date: 2017-02-15

The invention relates to a VCSEL structure based on a novel grating reflector. The grating reflector (1) comprises a grating layer (20) with a contiguous core grating region having a grating structure, wherein an index of refraction of high-index sections (21) of the grating structure is at least 2.5, and wherein an index of refraction of low-index sections (22) of the grating structure is less than 2. The core grating region defines a projection in a direction normal to the grating layer. The grating reflector further comprises a cap layer (30) abutting the grating layer (20), and an index of refraction of the cap layer within the projection of the core grating region onto the cap layer is at least 2.5, and within the projection of the core grating region, the cap layer is abutted by a first solid dielectric low-index layer, an index of refraction of the first low-index layer or air being less than 2; and within the projection of the core grating region, the grating layer is also abutted by a second low-index layer and/or by air, an index of refraction of the second low-index layer or air being less than 2. The VCSEL structure furthermore comprises a first reflector and an active region for providing a cavity and amplification. The cap layer (30) may comprise an active layer (32) between cladding layers (31,33) and electrical contacts (35,36) to provide a current through the active layer. Current confinement may be realized by low-index oxide regions (60).


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

They might not look like much but these miniature masterpieces are the width of a human hair. And despite their size, each packs in more pixels per square centimetre than the highest resolution screens available today. This level of detail is all down to a laser printing technique developed by Anders Kristensen and his team at the Technical University of Denmark in Copenhagen. By blasting lasers at a material made up of thousands of nanoscale plastic pillars covered with a thin layer of the element germanium, Kristensen has printed some of the highest resolution images ever made. The laser heats up each pillar to over 1000°C for a few nanoseconds, causing the germanium layer on its tip to change shape – which changes the colour of light it reflects and thus what colour it appears. Low intensity laser blasts cause it to reflect blue light, while ramping up the intensity shifts the colour towards reds and yellows. In this way, the surface of the material can be tuned so that each pillar reflects a different colour, ultimately allowing different images to be printed. The pillars are only a few tens of nanometres apart, which lets the team cram tens of thousands of spots of colour across every centimetre of the surface. The images above are just 50 nanometres wide and were printed at a resolution of 127,000 DPI (dots per inch). The display on an iPhone 7, for comparison, is 326 DPI. These are impressive results but don’t plan on trading in your HDTV just yet, says Debashis Chanda at the University of Central Florida. To start with, the colour spectrum of these images is extremely limited – there are no greens and the blues and reds are fairly dull. Kristensen thinks one way to get around this could be to replace the germanium layer with silicon, which reflects a slightly different colour spectrum when deformed. Once he gets his material to reflect green light he hopes to tackle the full colour spectrum. A bigger problem is turning the material into a screen that could display moving images. Adding the transistors and other electronics that make a display change colour would mean hugely increasing the size of the pixels in these images, Chanda says. As there is currently no way to keep such a high resolution and make the screen dynamic, he suggests that the technique could be useful for printing security labels or watermarks that are impossible to remove. Kristensen thinks that the technique could make it easier to adapt materials after they have been made – making it cheaper to customise car interiors, for example. A manufacturer could print off lots of interiors made of the plastic material and then use lasers to finish them off with different coloured designs. Because the technique doesn’t use any ink, the surface can be edited simply by firing lasers at it to produce a new pattern. Laser printing could also make recycling easier, Kristensen says. Plastics often need to be sorted into similar colours before they can be processed. But when the new material melts it loses its colour, ready to be remoulded and printed on again. Read more: Morphing molecule may shine in high-resolution screens; Turn your skin into a screen with a super-thin digital display


Flash Physics is our daily pick of the latest need-to-know developments from the global physics community selected by Physics World's team of editors and reporters It should be possible to create a matter-wave tractor beam that grabs hold of an object by firing particles at it – according to calculations by an international team of physicists. Tractor beams work by firing cone-like "Bessel beams" of light or sound at an object. Under the right conditions, the light or sound waves will bounce off the object in such a way that the object experiences a force in the opposite direction to that of the beam. If this force is greater than the outward pressure of the beam, the object will be pulled inwards. Now, Andrey Novitsky and colleagues at Belarusian State University, ITMO University in St Petersburg and the Technical University of Denmark have done calculations that show that beams of particles can also function as tractor beams. Quantum mechanics dictates that these particles also behave as waves and the team found that cone-like beams of matter waves should also be able to grab hold of objects. There is, however, an important difference regarding the nature of the interaction between the particles and the object. Novitsky and colleagues found that if the scattering is defined by the Coulomb interaction between charged particles, then it is not possible to create a matter-wave tractor beam. However, tractor beams are possible if the scattering is defined by a Yukawa potential, which is used to describe interactions between some subatomic particles. The calculations are described in Physical Review Letters. Household WiFi routers can be used to produce 3D holograms of rooms. The futuristic imaging process has been developed by Philipp Holl and Friedemann Reinhard of the Technical University of Munich in Germany. Using one fixed and one movable antenna, they measure the distortions in the router's microwave signal caused by it reflecting off and travelling through objects. The data are then fed through reconstruction algorithms enabling the researchers to produce 3D images of the environment surrounding the router at centimetre precision. The technique is simpler than optical holography, which relies upon elaborate laser equipment, and will have improved resolution when future WiFi technology has increased speed and bandwidth. The research has, however, raised concerns about privacy. "It is rather unlikely that this process will be used for the view into foreign bedrooms in the near future." Reinhard says to address these worries: "For that, you would need to go around the building with a large antenna, which would hardly go unnoticed." The method is also limited because microwaves come from so many devices and from multiple directions. Instead, Holl and Reinhard hope the technology, presented in Physical Review Letters, will be applied to recover victims buried under collapsed buildings or avalanches. Unlike conventional methods, it could provide spatial representation of the structures surrounding victims, allowing swifter and safer rescue. The UK Nuclear Industry Association (NIA) has called on the UK government to work closely with the nuclear industry to avoid a "cliff-edge" scenario after the country leaves the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). In its report – Exiting Euratom – the trade association for the UK's civil nuclear industry, which represents more than 260 companies, outlines six priority areas for negotiations with the European Commission as part of the "Brexit" negotiations. These include agreeing a new funding arrangement for the UK's involvement in Fusion 4 Energy, which is responsible for providing Europe's contribution to ITER fusion reactor in France, as well as setting out the process for the movement of nuclear material, goods, people and services post Brexit. The NIA also says that if a new Euratom deal is not agreed by the time the UK leaves the European Union in 2019 then the existing arrangement should continue until a new one is implemented.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.sciencenews.org

Researchers developed the new printing technique as an alternative to ink-based printing, in which colors fade with time. Aside from eternally vibrant art, the technique could lead to new types of color displays or improve security labels, the scientists report in the May 5 Science Advances. Anders Kristensen of Technical University of Denmark in Kongens Lyngby and colleagues designed the laser printing technique so that it requires only three materials: plastic, germanium and a protective coating. In traditional ink-based printing, paper acts as the base; in the new method, plastic provides the foundation. The surface of the plastic is shaped so that it has lots of tiny pillars, one roughly every 200 nanometers. A thin film of the element germanium is then spread over the plastic. Heat from a laser melts the germanium on each pillar, morphing its shape and thickness. As a result, it reflects a specific color. The coating protects the shapes of the newly carved nanostructures. Researchers have tried structure-based color printing before. But, Kristensen says, a film of germanium or similar material boosts the color contrast and the resolution. The new printer generates images at resolutions up to 127,000 dots per inch. Traditional laser printers, which use a fine powder called toner instead of ink, can reach only about 20,000 DPI, while ink-jet printers reach up to about 4,800 DPI. The new printer can create extremely tiny images, too: only 50 by 50 micrometers. A single pixel of the latest Retina HD Display technology is 63 micrometers across. These kinds of displays have to be backlit for text and color to appear. But the new technique creates color without backlighting. So it could lead to new displays, including 3-D ones. 3-D displays would tap into the orientation, or polarization, of the structures’ reflected light. Polarization could also be used to hide information in the germanium film. That encrypted information could improve security seals such as watermarks.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.spie.org

Light can be used to fabricate, handle, power, and actuate microrobotics functionalities, such as the loading and unloading of microcargo, showing promise for drug delivery and biological-testing applications. Light is an important research tool. It enables us to see things at a range of scales, from the macroscopic to the microscopic (where our own cells, bacteria, and other micro-organisms proliferate). A less familiar property of light is the momentum that it carries. This feature enables focused light to trap, move, and position microscopic objects.1 This has had significant implications, particularly in biomedical science, by enabling researchers to use light to extend their ‘hands,’ and manipulate biological samples with great precision. Additionally, optical forces are non-invasive (because of their pico-Newton magnitude) and can operate through sealed and sterile biological chambers. In addition to exploiting momentum to trap and move objects, light can now be used to generate secondary effects, such as heat. Previously, local heating in a microfluidic environment was achieved by using metal surfaces and metallic nanoparticles. These methods have enabled valve action,2 flow control,3 and mixing.4 They can also operate as catalysts for chemical reactions,5 and have even been applied for cancer therapy.6 However, a limitation faced when using metal layers in microfluidic devices arises because they are usually fixed to a certain region. In contrast, the motion and position of nanoparticles are difficult to control. To solve this maneuverability problem, we have integrated metallic structures into a new type of light-driven microrobot. Recent improvements in the fields of optical manipulation and microfabrication can cater to increasingly sophisticated objects. We leveraged these developments to create new functional robotic tools for light-based microbiological experiments. We employed a custom-fabrication technique, known as two-photon polymerization, to achieve 3D microprinting. In this process, focused laser beams are used to solidify a liquid polymer resin, achieving printed feature sizes of down to a fraction of the writing wavelength. As with 3D printers, different designs can be fabricated to perfectly suit particular applications. The structures that we have designed and demonstrated include wave-guided optical waveguides7 (WOWs) and, more recently, hollow microrobots for material transport, as illustrated in Figure 1. Furthermore, light-initiated physical reactions enable new functionalities in these optical microrobots.8 Among the functionalities that we have incorporated, a syringe action enables the optical microrobots to load and unload a tiny cargo, making them capable of material transport.8 Figure 1. (a) An artist's rendition of a multitude of light-driven micro-robots working together to probe a cell. (b) A hollow microrobot, designed for material transport, interacting with an oil droplet. (c) Scanning electron microscope image of the hollow microrobot. A mask is fabricated on top of the structure to secure exposure of only certain regions by metal-vapor deposition. The photoresist that we use in the fabrication of these light robots is practically transparent to the trapping beam wavelength and thus generates very little heat. Metals are efficient energy-to-heat converters of light, so to enhance laser-induced heat generation in the polymerized light robots, we embedded a thin metallic layer inside each of them using vapor deposition. For this purpose, we deposited a titanium adhesion layer and a gold layer (of 1 and 5nm thickness, respectively) as a circular disk inside the body of each light robot. Once the microrobots are introduced into a cytometry cuvette, they are individually maneuverable using four counter-propagating beams that trap each of the spherical handles. Further, an extra beam is used for controlled heating of the internal metallic layer. Sufficient laser heating forms a microbubble around which strong convection currents are generated. The results of our experiments, shown in Figure 2, demonstrate that the convection currents can draw 2μm-diameter silica beads into the structure. By combining convection currents with optical manipulation, each microrobot is made capable of picking up cargo at different locations. The hydrodynamic effect that is used to move particles can be quite strong and, in contrast to optical trapping and manipulation, does not rely on the refractive-index contrast. Figure 2. A hollow microrobot uses the generated convection current from a shaped laser beam targeted on the metallic layer to pull in 2μm-diameter silica beads. A hollow microrobot uses the generated convection current from a shaped laser beam targeted on the metallic layer to pull in 2μm-diameter silica beads. 8 Microcargo can subsequently be ejected by moving the heating beam across the body of the microtool, as shown in Figure 3. Many interesting phenomena can be observed here, such as thermo-capillary bubble migration,9 a directional change of the thermal gradient,10 and reversal of Marangoni convection (due to the presence of many particles).11 A video presentation of our recent results, published in Nature, is available online.12 Figure 3. (a) A collection of 1μm-diameter polystyrene beads are loaded inside a microrobot because of convection currents and (b) ejected by moving the heating beam across the body of the microrobot. (a) A collection of 1μm-diameter polystyrene beads are loaded inside a microrobot because of convection currents and (b) ejected by moving the heating beam across the body of the microrobot. 8 In summary, we have developed optical microrobots with a variety of novel capabilities and features. Among these, the ability to optically control loading and unloading could have potential use in new drug-delivery approaches for single-cell experiments. Our light-driven microrobots can also be used to provide physical and chemical stimuli to biological samples. This control is not limited to a single robot and could potentially be extended to a large handful using advanced software (i.e., swarm robotics), thereby enabling microrobots to mutually coordinate to unveil new ways of interacting, probing, and acquiring information (e.g., for 3D microbiology). Ultimately, we forecast that light robotics will lead to completely new and disruptive schemes for real-time 3D interactions with the microscopic world.12, 13 In our future work we will be investigating a range of applications for light robotics, particularly those relating to nanobiophotonics.14 We acknowledge support from the Innovation Fund Denmark under the project Enhanced Spatial Light Control in Advanced Optical Fibres. Department of Photonics Engineering Technical University of Denmark Jesper Glückstad is currently a professor at DTU Fotonik. Previously, he was a guest professor of biophotonics at the Lund Institute of Technology (2006–2011). He established the Programmable Phase Optics group and labs15 in the late 1990s, received the Danish Optical Society Award in 2000, and was elected Scientist of the Year 2005 by Ib Henriksen's Foundation in Denmark. He is a Fellow of SPIE and OSA. Mark J. Villangca finished his MSc in physics at the University of the Philippines, where he worked on beam shaping using computer-generated holograms. He subsequently completed his PhD in photonics engineering at the Technical University of Denmark as a member of the Programmable Phase Optics group, working on light-driven microrobots. He also works with generalized phase contrast and digital holography for beam shaping. Darwin Z. Palima is an associate professor at DTU Fotonik. He achieved his PhD in physics from the University of the Philippines and then moved to Denmark to work as a postdoctoral student. He has co-authored a book on generalized phase contrast and actively publishes in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings. He currently teaches biophotonics and optical engineering while pursuing his research interests, including computer-generated holograms, generalized phase contrast, optical trapping and micromanipulation, microscopy, and biophotonics applications. OptoRobotix ApS Andrew R. Bañas earned his PhD from DTU Fotonik. His work with the Programmable Phase Optics group, including applying Fourier optics or electrodynamics to get the most out of experiments, has been featured in Optics Express and OPN. He has also designed and built hardware and software for beam shaping and optical-manipulation systems. He is currently pursuing tech-transfer activities, including the application of generalized phase contrast and cell sorting for studying disease. 5. C. Vázquez-Vázquez, B. Vaz, V. Giannini, M. Pérez-Lorenzo, R. A. Alvarez-Puebla, M. A. Correa-Duarte, Nanoreactors for simultaneous remote thermal activation and optical monitoring of chemical reactions, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, p. 13616-13619, 2013. doi:10.1021/ja4051873 6. N. S. Abadeer, C. J. Murphy, Recent progress in cancer thermal therapy using gold nanoparticles, J. Phys. Chem. C 120, p. 4691-4716, 2016. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b11232 9. D. W. Berry, N. R. Heckenberg, H. Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Effects associated with bubble formation in optical trapping, J. Mod. Opt. 47, p. 1575-1585, 2000. doi:10.1080/09500340008235124 12. http://tinyurl.com/zzq8th3 Rendition showing a small swarm of light-actuated microrobots interacting with a cell. The insets shows experimental results with light-actuated microrobots performing loading and unloading of cargo. Credit: Mark Jayson Villangca, DTU Fotonik. 13. D. Palima, J. Glückstad, Gearing up for optical microrobotics: micromanipulation and actuation of synthetic microstructures by optical forces, Laser Photon. Rev. 7, p. 478-494, 2013. doi:10.1002/lpor.201200030


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: worldmaritimenews.com

A researcher from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) has developed in cooperation with MAN Diesel & Turbo a new software which limits emissions of NOx particles and black smoke from vessels, the university said. The invention is expected to be implemented in new marine engines from the end of 2017. The regulations on NOx emissions from ships have been tightened in recent years. Since 2016, there has been a requirement in North America to reduce emissions from large two-stroke diesel engines on new vessels by 75 percent and in a few years, the same reduction will also be required in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. “EGR technology is one way of reducing NOx emissions. However, the regulator for the EGR technology meant that black smoke was created in connection with the rapid acceleration of a ship, which is undesirable and can damage the engine. The black smoke could be removed by maneuvering ships differently, but we wanted to maintain the current sailing properties and solve the problem in a different way instead,” Casper Hededal Svendsen, Head of Emission Control at MAN Diesel & Turbo, explained. Initially, the company tried conventional approaches, but, as this did not work, they decided they needed external assistance. The cooperation involved not only DTU Electrical Engineering but also Linköping University. This research served as inspiration for Ph.D. student Kræn Vodder Nielsen. “However, marine engines are very different. Sometimes they are two-stroke engines and not four-stroke engines, so it was not possible to just copy the approach from car engines,” Kræn Vodder Nielsen said. MAN Diesel & Turbo uses EGR technology, in which part of the exhaust gas is recirculated to the engine to limit NOx emissions. It is crucial in this context that the recirculation takes place with the right quantity of exhaust so that enough is recirculated to reduce the formation of NOx and there is sufficient oxygen to combust the fuel – thus preventing black smoke when the ship accelerates or slows down, according to the DTU. “I found out that the academic methods for development of the control of a marine engine with EGR technology at that time were too complex. Therefore, it quickly became clear to me that I had to develop a simple model that includes only the critical part of the system that we wanted to improve. From there, we developed a new control that coordinates the recirculation and fuel injection without requiring too much tuning of other parts of the system,” Kræn Vodder Nielsen further said. The new control technology was tested on a couple of marine engines during the project. The tests showed that it worked, avoiding the formation of black smoke without affecting the vessel’s maneuverability. Kræn is now employed by MAN Diesel & Turbo, where he is helping finalize his software. “Initially, I will go out and install it on the ships, but in the long term the plan is that I will write a guide so that shipbuilders and crews can fine-tune the system themselves,” Kræn pointed out.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: phys.org

Structural color laser printing of a photo demonstrating that a highly saturated cyan, magenta, and yellow (CMY) combination successfully leads to a half-toned black color. Credit: Technical University of Denmark (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at the Technical University of Denmark has developed a way to print colors onto a surface without using ink and which will not fade. In their paper published in the open-access journal Sciences Advances, the group describes the inspiration for their approach, how it works, their results and the one thing they still need to solve before their technique can be industrialized. In nature, color differentiation is created in two different ways. One is through pigments, which are like those in our skin—the other is by the creation of tiny, unique structures on surfaces such as those in bird feathers, fish scales and many other organisms. With pigments, the material is actually colored. With color structuring, color derives from microscopic structures on the surface of an object that redirect frequencies of light. Up till now, copy machines have used pigments in ink to create colors on a page. In this new effort, the researchers have worked out a way to create coloring on a surface using a laser to melt a very thin layer of germanium, a semimetal. The idea behind the printing technique is to heat the germanium to melt it in certain ways that leave certain tiny shapes behind after cooling—these shapes reflect light in a desired way. To achieve this feat, a very thin layer of germanium is laid down over a material that has an array of microscopic polymer columns on it. The laser is then used to melt the germanium in ways that correspond to desired colors. The columns are so small that the process can print images at 100,000 dpi, suggesting much higher resolution than can be obtained using pigmenting. The result, the researchers note, is a color image that, like bird feathers, will not fade, because it is not created using pigments. They suggest the technique might be useful for printing security patterns or watermarks. There is one glaring problem with the technique, the researchers note—currently, it does not allow for printing the color green, because green resides in the middle of the spectrum—printing it would require laser building a structure that is able to absorb both red and blue light. They report that they are currently working on ways to build more complicated nanostructures to address the problem. The cyan, magenta, and yellow (CMY) half-toning process showing the original image, the half-toned original image, a magenta color on a cyan background and a laser-printed final image. Credit: Technical University of Denmark Explore further: Bird feathers inspire researchers to produce vibrant new colors More information: Xiaolong Zhu et al. Resonant laser printing of structural colors on high-index dielectric metasurfaces, Science Advances (2017). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1602487 Abstract Man-made structural colors, which originate from resonant interactions between visible light and manufactured nanostructures, are emerging as a solution for ink-free color printing. We show that non-iridescent structural colors can be conveniently produced by nanostructures made from high-index dielectric materials. Compared to plasmonic analogs, color surfaces with high-index dielectrics, such as germanium (Ge), have a lower reflectance, yielding a superior color contrast. Taking advantage of band-to-band absorption in Ge, we laser-postprocess Ge color metasurfaces with morphology-dependent resonances. Strong on-resonance energy absorption under pulsed laser irradiation locally elevates the lattice temperature (exceeding 1200 K) in an ultrashort time scale (1 ns). This forms the basis for resonant laser printing, where rapid melting allows for surface energy–driven morphology changes with associated modification of color appearance. Laser-printable high-index dielectric color metasurfaces are scalable to a large area and open a new paradigm for printing and decoration with nonfading and vibrant colors.


Novitsky A.,Technical University of Denmark | Qiu C.-W.,National University of Singapore | Lavrinenko A.,Technical University of Denmark
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2012

A Bessel beam without an axial gradient can exert a pulling force on an object [A. Novitsky, C.W. Qiu, and H. Wang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 203601 (2011)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.203601]. However, it cannot be called a "tractor beam" per se, as long as the light pulling effect is ultrasensitive to the object's material and size, a perturbation of which will make the optical traction go away. In this Letter, we investigate and report on the universality for a Bessel beam to be either a material-independent or size-independent optical tractor beam within the dipolar regime. Moreover, a general condition for a nonparaxial laser to be simultaneously a material- and size-independent tractor beam is proposed. These universal pulling effects and conditions are discussed in association with insight on modified far-field scattering, scattering resonances, and induced polarizabilities. Interestingly, we find that the acoustic pulling force exhibits only size independence, owing to the acoustic scattering theory in contrast to the light scattering counterpart. The findings pave the way for the realistic engineering and application of universal tractor beams pulling a wide variety of objects. © 2012 American Physical Society.


Novitsky A.,Technical University of Denmark | Qiu C.-W.,National University of Singapore | Wang H.,Data Storage Institute Singapore
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2011

Usually a light beam pushes a particle when the photons act upon it. We investigate the optical forces by nonparaxial gradientless beams and find that the forces can drag suitable particles all the way towards the light source. The major criterion of realizing the backward dragging force is the strong nonparaxiality of the light beam, which contributes to the pulling force owing to momentum conservation. The nonparaxiality of the Bessel beam can be manipulated to possess a dragging force along both the radial longitudinal directions, i.e., a "tractor beam" with stable trajectories is achieved. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: ICT-2013.9.9 | Award Amount: 74.61M | Year: 2013

This Flagship aims to take graphene and related layered materials from a state of raw potential to a point where they can revolutionize multiple industries from flexible, wearable and transparent electronics, to new energy applications and novel functional composites.\nOur main scientific and technological objectives in the different tiers of the value chain are to develop material technologies for ICT and beyond, identify new device concepts enabled by graphene and other layered materials, and integrate them to systems that provide new functionalities and open new application areas.\nThese objectives are supported by operative targets to bring together a large core consortium of European academic and industrial partners and to create a highly effective technology transfer highway, allowing industry to rapidly absorb and exploit new discoveries.\nThe Flagship will be aligned with European and national priorities to guarantee its successful long term operation and maximal impact on the national industrial and research communities.\nTogether, the scientific and technological objectives and operative targets will allow us to reach our societal goals: the Flagship will contribute to sustainable development by introducing new energy efficient and environmentally friendly products based on carbon and other abundant, safe and recyclable natural resources, and boost economic growth in Europe by creating new jobs and investment opportunities.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-3-03 | Award Amount: 4.43M | Year: 2009

Although classical swine fever (CSF) has been eradicated in wide areas within the EU the disease is endemic in some new member states particularly in back yard pigs. In order to improve the eradication strategies the project aims are a) the final development and testing of a live marker vaccine candidate for the prevention and improved control of CSF, both orally and intramuscularly applicable; b) the development and optimisation of accompanying discriminatory diagnostic tests; c) the production of an effective, oral delivery system for the marker vaccine for use in wild boar and back yard pigs; d) the easy selection of diseased animals. The improved knowledge on immunological reactions and pathogenesis will support a more efficient vaccine application and provide data for the epidemiological models. Epidemiological studies of CSF in domestic and back yard pigs and in wild boar including molecular epidemiology intend to increase the insight of CSF transmission and persistence. Epidemiological models will be developed to support risk assessment as well for conventional eradication strategies as for new strategies using the new vaccines and diagnostic tools including the role of CSF reservoirs. The results concerning anti-viral treatment will be evaluated and compared with the traditional eradication strategies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2013.2.2-4 | Award Amount: 5.43M | Year: 2013

The multidisciplinary consortium of the NanoCaTe project will develop a more efficient thermoelectric- and storage material based on nanocarbon (e.g. graphene and CNT) to reclaim waste heat by thermoelectric generators and to storage the energy in super capacitors or secondary batteries for manifold applications like pulsed sensors or mobile electronic devices. The integration of the developed materials into harvester and storage devices is a further step to characterize the performance of the innovative materials. Finally, a demonstrator consisting of harvester, storage and energy management represents a self-sustaining, universally usable, and maintenance-free power supply. The project will substantially strengthen the position of Europe in the field of thermoelectric and storage materials by developing devices with increased lifetime produced by cost-efficient technologies and therefore contributing to a further promotion of cleaner energy technologies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SPA.2013.1.1-06 | Award Amount: 3.49M | Year: 2013

The aim of this project is to develop a next generation sea ice information service by integrating and building on a wide range of European and national funded activities which incorporate many of the required components. In the Arctic the retreat of the sea ice during the last two decades is facilitating an astonishing increase in natural resource development accompanied by increased shipping activity. The Antarctic is also seeing increased ship traffic driven by fisheries, cruise ships and scientific research. The past and current funding of European capability has reflected the critical importance of sea ice information in both marine transportation and the impact of regional climate change. However previously funded projects address distinct elements of the complete service chain and it is now timely to bring these together to address some obvious gaps in order to prove a complete and fully operational service is possible. This project will demonstrate a complete end-to-end operational sea ice information service, by building on existing capabilities and filling gaps in required information and technology. Polar Ice will include development of new information services including sea ice pressure and thickness products. The project will also investigate transfer of current sea ice forecasting methods from the Baltic to wider application in the Arctic and Antarctic. Polar Ice will then demonstrate integration of existing national and European funded capability to prove a complete operational real-time sea ice service. This will encompass primary data delivered by the GMES space segment and marine core services, value added information from GMES downstream activities and industry, delivery based on inter-operable data standards defined by the INSPIRE directive and integration into user systems based on industry requirements and best practice.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRAIA-1-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 9.71M | Year: 2015

AQUAEXCEL2020 aims to integrate top class European aquaculture research facilities of very diverse nature, covering all relevant scientific fields for research and innovation in aquaculture, from genetics to technology through pathology, physiology and nutrition. It will put in place a user-friendly one-stop access to high-quality services and resources from 39 installations covering both established and new aquaculture species, all types of experimental systems as well as sequencing facilities. Giving a prominent place to EU aquaculture industry research needs through a strong involvement of the European Aquaculture Technology and Innovation Platform, it will enable excellent research and sustainable innovation to both public and private sector. It will benefit from the support of the ESFRI infrastructures EMBRC (Marine Biology) and ELIXIR (Life Sciences data) and bring aquaculture research specificities to their agendas. AQUAEXCEL2020 will be a key vehicle in the improvement of aquaculture research practices to the benefit of industry through finalized research and innovation, and of excellent science through the development of highly innovative methods and approaches such as Virtual Laboratories, standardized experimental fish lines and nano-sensors. It will also benefit to society through the development of methods for sustainable aquaculture, such as the use of cleaner fish to control parasites or Integrated Multitrophic Aquaculture, and also through a better management of animal experiments for research according to the 3 Rs, Reduction (via e.g. capitalization of data and provision of stable experimental fish lines), Refinement (via a better control of experimental procedures) and Replacement (via e.g. Virtual Laboratories). As a whole, AQUAEXCEL2020 will provide a world-class platform for all types of fish culture research, from biology to technology, in all types of rearing systems, with all major EU fish species, including the most promising new species.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.3.3.2.1. | Award Amount: 6.33M | Year: 2009

The main goal of PROSUITE is to develop a framework methodology, operational methods and tools for the sustainability assessment of current and future technologies over their life cycle, applicable to different stages of maturity. The project will apply the methodology for four technology cases with close consultation of the stakeholders involved, which includes cases from biorefineries, nanotechnology, information technologies, and carbon storage and sequestration. PROSUITE will show (i) how to combine technology forecasting methods with life cycle approaches, and (ii) how to develop and possibly combine the economic, environmental and social sustainability dimensions in a standardized, comprehensive, and broadly accepted way. PROSUITE will create a solid research basis for technology characterization, including the identification of decisive technology features, basic engineering modules for estimations of material flows and energy use, and learning curves. For the economic assessment, methods for the assessment for economic and sectoral impacts of novel technologies will be developed and combined with background data for scenario-based life-cycle inventory modelling. For the environmental assessment, state-of-the-art environment indicators will be proposed together with targeted method development for the assessment of geographically explicit land and water use impacts, metal toxicity and outdoor nanoparticle exposure. For the social assessment, a set of quantitative and qualitative social indicators will be selected via participatory approaches, setting the standard for future assessments. The use of various multicriteria assessment methods will be explored to aggegrate across indicators. The methods developed will be part of a decision support system, which will be output as open source modular software.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.3.5 | Award Amount: 10.64M | Year: 2012

In recent years it has become clear that mid-IR imaging spectroscopy has the potential to open a new chapter in bio-medical imaging and offers an effective tool for early cancer diagnosis and improved survival rates. Rather than a search for cancer marker absorption peaks, great progress has been made by analysing the entire bio-molecular mid-IR spectral signature using automated algorithms. However, the lack of suitable sources, detectors and components has restricted the technology to one of academic interest, based on weak thermal sources, low power lasers or synchrotron research tools.For the first time the photonic technology is in place to develop a new mid-IR technology platform on which entirely novel supercontinuum sources (c. 1000x brighter than thermal sources) covering the whole range from 1.5 to 12 m may be built:-Low loss robust chalcogenide fibres for fibre lasers, supercontinuum generation and delivery -Fibre end caps, splicing and fusion technology for soft glass fibres -Crystal technology and novel designs for mid-IR AO modulators based on calomel -Flexible fast AO driver technology to enable high speed HSI acquisition -Low cost T2SL FPA detectors with performance matching state-of-the-art MSL devices -2.9 m Er:ZBLAN and 4.5 m Pr-doped chalcogenide fibre laser pumps -Robust designs for a range of mid-IR SCG sources: a) 1.5-4.5 m from ZBLAN fibre b) 1.5-5.5 m from InF3 fibre c) 3-9 m from 2.9 m pumped PCF chalcogenide fibre d) 4-12 m from 4.5 m pumped step-index chalcogenide fibre.Two specific high impact applications will be addressed: high volume pathology screening (i.e. automated microscope-based examination of samples) and in vivo, remote, real-time skin surface examination (i.e. non-invasive investigation of suspected skin cancer).This project will open the mid-IR to further exploitation, and the technology developed will be transferable to a huge range of applications both in bio-photonics and in wider industry.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-04-2015 | Award Amount: 6.69M | Year: 2016

CLAiR-City will apportion air pollution emissions and concentrations, carbon footprints and health outcomes by city citizens behaviour and day-to-day activities in order to make these challenges relevant to how people chose to live, behave and interact within their city environment. Through an innovative engagement and quantification toolkit, we will stimulate the public engagement necessary to allow citizens to define a range of future city scenarios for reducing their emissions to be used for supporting and informing the development of bespoke city policy packages out to 2050. Using six pilot cities/regions (Amsterdam, NL; Bristol, UK; Aveiro, PT; Liguria, IT; Ljubljana, SI; and Sosnowiec, PO), CLAiR-City will source apportion current emissions/concentrations and carbon emissions not only by technology but by citizens activities, behavior and practices. CLAiR-City will explore and evaluate current local, national and international policy and governance structures to better understand the immediate policy horizon and how that may impact on citizens and their citys future. Then, working with the new methods of source apportionment to combine both baseline citizen and policy evidence, CLAiR-City will use innovative engagement methods such as Games, an App and Citizen Days to inform and empower citizens to understand the current challenges and then subsequently define their own visions of their citys future based on how their want to live out to 2050. The impact of these citizen-led future city scenarios will analysed, to develop city specific policy packages in which the clean-air, low-carbon, healthy future, as democratically defined by the city citizens, is described and quantified. The results of the CLAiR-City process will be evaluated to provide policy lessons at city, national and EU levels. Additionally, the toolkit structure will be developed for all EU cities with more than 50,000 citizens establishing a basis to roll out the CLAiR-City process across Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-2-15 | Award Amount: 3.78M | Year: 2010

Coastal areas are subject to an increase in competing activities and protection (Natura 2000, Marine Strategy Directive) and are a source of potential conflict for space allocation. COEXIST is a broad, multidisciplinary approach to evaluate these interactions with the ultimate goal to provide a roadmap to better integration, sustainability and synergies among different activities in the coastal zone. 1. The project will study the interactions between capture fisheries and aquaculture and evaluate mutual benefits and possible bottlenecks for concomitant development of these activities in the coastal zone within the context of the ecosystem approach to management. 2. It will propose, develop and evaluate the efficiency of spatial management tools (zoning, closed areas, etc) to promote different forms of coastal aquaculture and fisheries at different scales (e.g. local, regional) and it will exploit mutual opportunities (e.g. artificial reefs, protected areas, wind farms, tourism etc) within a context of competition for space by multiple users. 3. The project will address differences in acceptance of activities (fisheries, aquaculture, and other use of the coastal zone) by the society. 4. A detailed strategy for communication and involvement of stakeholders and for dissemination of results to general and targeted audiences is integrated in the project. By these actions, the project will support the new European Maritime Policy and spatial planning of coastal areas. Case studies, supported by national projects will be used to provide data for further analysis through the integrated work packages This will include detailed comparative analyses and integrated models for the regional seas, as well as a synthesis on the European scale. COEXIST will address interactions on a biological and biogeochemical level, as well as a socio-economic level, and the governance and legal aspects.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2008.1.1.3.1. | Award Amount: 4.68M | Year: 2009

The aim of this project is to achieve an improved knowledge of the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to climate variability and extremes, to represent and apply this knowledge over Europe with predictive terrestrial carbon cycle modelling, to interpret the model predictions in terms of vulnerability of the terrestrial in particular soil carbon pools and give according advice to EU climate and soil protection policies. This objective will be achieved by integrating three major types of recent and new solid scientific carbon cycle data, from: (i) soil process studies, (ii) a network of established ecosystem manipulation experiments, and (iii) long-term observations spanning several times-scales (e.g. eddy covariance data, tree rings and growth, crop yields, long-term remote sensing data on soil moisture and vegetation activity and soil carbon inventories). The integration will be reached by establishing a consistent and harmonized data base and by confronting the terrestrial carbon cycle models with the multiple data sets within a Bayesian model identification and improvement procedure. Specific model development concerning processes affected by extreme events (e.g. soil carbon destabilization, tree growth response incl. lag effects and mortality) will be included and followed by model testing and improvement against the data made available in the project. The improved models will simulate terrestrial processes relevant to carbon balance and soil erosion at pan- European scale using regionalized climate scenarios with explicit inclusion of extreme climatic events. Since we are using several climate scenarios and an ensemble of models we will be able to characterize the uncertainties in prediction coming from models and climate scenarios. We will interpret the empirical evidence from the observational work and the model simulations in a framework of vulnerability assessment and disseminate and discuss results with stakeholders at EU level.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-32-2014 | Award Amount: 3.96M | Year: 2015

Online banking, e-commerce, telemedicine, mobile communication, and cloud computing depend fundamentally on the security of the underlying cryptographic algorithms. Public-key algorithms are particularly crucial since they provide digital signatures and establish secure communication without requiring in-person meetings. Essentially all applications today are based on RSA or on the discrete-logarithm problem in finite fields or on elliptic curves. Cryptographers optimize parameter choices and implementation details for these systems and build protocols on top of these systems; cryptanalysts fine-tune attacks and establish exact security levels for these systems. Alternative systems are far less visible in research and unheard of in practice. It might seem that having three systems offers enough variation, but these systems are all broken as soon as large quantum computers are built. The EU and governments around the world are investing heavily in building quantum computers; society needs to be prepared for the consequences, including cryptanalytic attacks accelerated by these computers. Long-term confidential documents such as patient health-care records and state secrets have to guarantee security for many years, but information encrypted today using RSA or elliptic curves and stored until quantum computers are available will then be as easy to decipher as Enigma-encrypted messages are today. PQCRYPTO will allow users to switch to post-quantum cryptography: cryptographic systems that are not merely secure for today but that will also remain secure long-term against attacks by quantum computers. PQCRYPTO will design a portfolio of high-security post-quantum public-key systems, and will improve the speed of these systems, adapting to the different performance challenges of mobile devices, the cloud, and the Internet of Things. PQCRYPTO will provide efficient implementations of high-security post-quantum cryptography for a broad spectrum of real-world applications.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-3-3-02 | Award Amount: 3.47M | Year: 2010

This project intends to engineer transaminase libraries that will be applied as the main enzymatic technology to deliver the amine functionality in the commercially valuable products of both chiral and bulk amine targets. These enzymes will be used in enzymatic cascades where simple starting materials are converted into the required intermediates for transamination or further enzymatic steps will be used to remove products from the transaminase reaction which will add value by extra functionality. This will also be supported by the development of enzymatic cascades to deliver efficient co-factor recycling and achieve the high conversions required for industrial use. A high throughput screening method based on a further enzymatic cascade will be developed. Engineering solutions will be used to overcome obstacles associated with the implementation of this core technology on a larger scale and integrate the use of other enzymes into the synthetic pathway to allow multi-step, multi-enzyme cascades to be used to deliver complex multi-functional amine products and processes. The industrial partner will target the development of enzymes from the project for specific application into their new products range. Life cycle analysis and environmental impact analysis will compare the final methods with conventional chemical synthesis and allow advantages to be objectively defined.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-2-04 | Award Amount: 7.82M | Year: 2010

SOLIBAM will develop specific and novel breeding approaches integrated with management practices to improve the performance, quality, sustainability and stability of crops adapted to organic and low-input systems, in their diversity in Europe and taking into account small-scale farms in Africa. SOLIBAM will: 1. Identify traits specific for adaptation to low-input/organic conditions over a wide range of agro-climatic conditions in Europe 2. Develop efficient phenotyping, genotyping and molecular tools to monitor heritable variation during selection. Molecular analysis of functional polymorphisms will increase accuracy in breeding methodologies and improve monitoring of genetic diversity and adaptation along generations. It will also increase the understanding of adaptive phenomena 3. Develop the use of within-crop diversity to stabilise yield and quality in the face of current and increasing variation in organic and low-input agriculture 4. Design, develop and test innovative arable and vegetable cropping systems based on integration of a high level of diversification in crop management with the use of genetically diverse populations or varieties 5. Compare the effectiveness of different breeding strategies under conventional, low input and certified organic farming to set up optimal strategies for the production of varieties suitable for organic and low input farming taking into account the traits which are avoided in conventional breeding 6. Develop methodologies for farmers participatory research that exploit SOLIBAMs advances in low-input and organic farming 7. Quantify the effects and interactions of breeding and management innovations on crop nutritional, organoleptic and end-use quality 8. Evaluate socio-economic and environmental impacts of SOLIBAM breeding and management innovations in order to identify farm business, consumer preference, food supply and legislation related issues that are likely to influence their adoption


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2010.1.2.2-2 | Award Amount: 3.67M | Year: 2011

A consortium of world-class scientists from both academia and industry has been assembled to assess the risks to wild animals and humans posed by environmental exposure to pharmaceuticals. Their expertise will be supplemented by an advisory group consisting of representatives of all stakeholders. This project will concentrate on two classes of human pharmaceuticals, namely antibiotics and anti-cancer drugs, because there are good reasons for thinking that these could be of particular concern. In order to conduct sound risk assessments, including providing estimates of uncertainty, it will be necessary to obtain accurate data on both exposure concentrations and effects levels. Hence, new data on both environmental concentrations and effects on aquatic organisms will be produced during the project. The comparative sensitivities of embryos and adults will be determined, and used to reduce uncertainty in the risk assessments. The stable transformation products of the selected pharmaceuticals will also be investigated. All stakeholders and beneficiaries will be represented in the project, so that results are rapidly and reliably transferred to all interested parties. A prototype web-based classification system will be developed during the project with the intention of enabling all EU citizens to make their own informed decisions about the risk posed by human pharmaceuticals to their health and to the health of the environment. The results will able EU regulators and policy makers to make better informed decisions on the issue of pharmaceuticals in the environment.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-07-2014 | Award Amount: 20.85M | Year: 2014

COMPARE aims to harness the rapid advances in molecular technology to improve identification and mitigation of emerging infectious diseases and foodborne outbreaks. To this purpose COMPARE will establish a One serves all analytical framework and data exchange platform that will allow real time analysis and interpretation of sequence-based pathogen data in combination with associated data (e.g. clinical, epidemiological data) in an integrated inter-sectorial, interdisciplinary, international, one health approach. The framework will link research, clinical and public health organisations active in human health, animal health, and food safety in Europe and beyond, to develop (i) integrated risk assessment and risk based collection of samples and data, (ii) harmonised workflows for generating comparable sequence and associated data, (iii) state-of-the-art analytical workflows and tools for generating actionable information for support of patient diagnosis, treatment, outbreak detection and -investigation and (iv) risk communication tools. The analytical workflows will be linked to a flexible, scalable and open-source data- and information platform supporting rapid sharing, interrogation and analysis of sequence-based pathogen data in combination with other associated data. The system will be linked to existing and future complementary systems, networks and databases such as those used by ECDC, NCBI and EFSA. The functionalities of the system will be tested and fine tuned through underpinning research studies on priority pathogens covering healthcare-associated infections, food-borne disease, and (zoonotic) (re-) emerging diseases with epidemic or pandemic potential. Throughout the project, extensive consultations with future users, studies into the barriers to open data sharing, dissemination and training activities and studies on the cost-effectiveness of the system will support future sustainable user uptake.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.2-09 | Award Amount: 6.51M | Year: 2012

The MSY concept was included as a principle in the 2009 Green Paper on the reform of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) in accordance with the global imperative to manage fish stocks according to the maximum sustainable yield (MSY). This implies a commitment to direct management of fish stocks towards achieving MSY by 2015. Attaining this goal is complicated by the lack of common agreement on the interpretation of sustainability and yield and by the effects that achieving MSY for one stock may have on other stocks and broader ecosystem, economic, or social aspects. MYFISH will provide definitions of MSY variants which maximize other measures of yield than biomass and which account for the fact that single species rarely exist in isolation. Further, MYFISH will redefine the term sustainable to signify that Good Environmental Status (MSFD) is achieved and economically and socially unacceptable situations are avoided, all with acceptable levels of risk. In short, MYFISH aims at integrating the MSY concept with the overarching principals of the CFP: the precautionary and the ecosystem approach. MYFISH will achieve this objective through addressing fisheries in all RAC areas and integrating stakeholders (the fishing industry, NGOs and managers) throughout the project. Existing ecosystem and fisheries models will be modified to perform maximization of stakeholder approved yield measures while ensuring acceptable impact levels on ecosystem, economic and social aspects. Implementation plans are proposed and social aspects addressed through active involvement of stakeholders. Finally, effects of changes in environment, economy and society on MSY variants are considered, aiming at procedures rendering the MSY approach robust to such changes. The expertise of 26 partners from relevant disciplines including fisheries, ecosystem, economic and social science are involved in all aspects of the project. Global experience is engaged from North America and the South Pacific.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.2-10 | Award Amount: 3.83M | Year: 2012

SOCIOEC is an interdisciplinary, European wide project bringing together scientists from several fisheries sciences with industry partners and other key stakeholders to work in an integrated manner on solutions for future fisheries management, that can be implemented at a regional level. The central concept is to provide a mechanism for developing measures that are consistent with the overarching sustainability objectives of the EU, and that can provide consensus across all stakeholders. The first step will be to develop a coherent and consistent set of management objectives, which will address ecological; economic and social sustainability targets. The objectives should be consistent with the aims of the CFP, MSFD and other EU directives, but they should also be understandable by the wider stakeholder community and engage their support. This will then lead to the proposal of a number of potential management measures, based on existing or new approaches. The second step will be to analyze the incentives for compliance provided by these measures. In particular, we will examine fishers responses and perceptions of these measures, based on historical analysis as well as direct consultation and interviews. This project part will also examine how the governance can be changed to facilitate self- and co-management to ensure fisher buy-in to promising management measures. In particular, the project will focus on the interpretation of overarching (i.e. EU) objectives in local and regional contexts. Finally, the project will examine the impacts of the management measures that emerge from this process, particularly in terms of their economic and social impacts. The IA analysis will be integrated by evaluating the proposed measures against the criteria of effectiveness, efficiency and coherence. Special attention will be paid in evaluating the proposed management measures performance in terms of their ability to achieve the general and specific ecological objectives.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2010.1.2-4 | Award Amount: 3.75M | Year: 2010

Successful adaptation of nanotechnology in the end-products requires an access to the nanofiller technology and to the raw materials. The MINANO-project brings together partners representing end-users product know-how, formulation and processing technology and most importantly secure and reliable source of nano raw materials. Although there has been tremendous development in the area of nanocompounds with improved functionality, there exists a need to develop an efficient, continuous method of large-scale, low-cost synthesis of such materials. To answer to this need the following steps are suggested: 1) Integrate the functionalization of the high-quality nanoparticles directly on the continuous mass-production process already in the mining industry, 2) ensure controlled dispersion to the matrix material in large scale by cooperation between nanoparticle producer and end-product manufacturer, 3) assure sustainable and safe production and use by state-of-the-art life-cycle analysis. Based on the mass production process and cooperative value chain we concentrate on three major functionalities: Flame retardancy, UV resistance and antimicrobial properties. These properties are achieved by functionalized Mg(OH)2, ZnO and Ag nanoparticles. Societal and industrial impacts of these properties are extensive and there is a strong request of these functionalities for both plastic and wood-plastic based matrix materials. The use of nano-sized functional filler materials enables to use smaller amount of additives thus giving better recyclability, lower weight, higher mechanical strength and potential multifunctional features to the end-product. The combination of new nanofunctionalities gives far reaching possibilities for new types of functional plastics, and completely new possibilities to wood-plastic composites as well. This moves both mining industry and end-product companies towards high-tech on the long run.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETOPEN-1-2014 | Award Amount: 3.57M | Year: 2015

CHROMAVISION aims to develop a pioneering chromosome imaging and manipulation platform that will fuel the next decades of structural chromosome research. Chromosomal abnormalities are characteristic of many disorders such as cancer, impaired fertility due to maternal aging, and neurological disorders such as fragile X syndrome. If humanity is to fully understand the wide range of diseases that are associated to errors in cell division, we must be able to further zoom in on healthy and diseased chromosomes in all their complexity. The CHROMAVISION platform will allow molecular biologists to automatically isolate individual chromosomes from small tissue or cell samples and have these delivered to a super-resolution microscope. Chromosome isolation and delivery is achieved by an opto-fluidic chip that is able to trap, visualise and lyse individual cells and separate metaphase chromosomes from cell lysate. Single chromosomes can be hand-selected and brought into focus of the Super-Resolution Correlative Tweezers Fluorescence Microscope (CTFM-SR3D) that is developed in CHROMAVISION. This instrument will for the first time enable 3D, super-resolution, real-time metaphase chromosome observation and manipulation studies under near-physiological conditions. The technique will push the boundaries of what is currently possible in microfluidics and super-resolution microscopy and combine these into a single powerful approach for chromosome studies. Furthermore, the platform will be applied in CHROMAVISION to address key challenges in clinical and fundamental chromosome research, potentially resulting in breakthrough discoveries. Better imaging and understanding of the chromosomal mechanisms will contribute to our knowledge of the etiology of human diseases and aid drug discovery. The platform will also have large clinical value, allowing identification and monitoring of e.g. cancer heterogeneity.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EE-03-2014 | Award Amount: 5.33M | Year: 2015

RIBuild will strengthen the knowledge on how and under what conditions internal thermal insulation is to be implemented in historic buildings, without compromising their architectural and cultural values, with an acceptable safety level against deterioration and collapse of heavy external wall structures. The general objective of RIBuild is to develop effective, comprehensive decision guidelines to optimise the design and implementation of internal thermal insulation in historic buildings across the EU. RIBuild focuses on heavy external walls made of stone, brick and timber framing, as most historic buildings are made of these materials. The general objective is achieved through three main activities To obtain a thorough knowledge level to characterise the eligibility of the building for a deep internal thermal insulation renovation. This knowledge is obtained through screening of historic buildings, investigation of material properties and threshold values for failure To determine the conditions under which different internal insulation measures are reliable and affordable measures based on probabilistic modelling of the hygrothermal performance, the environmental impact and the cost/benefit To develop a set of comprehensive decision guidelines, which are demonstrated in a number of buildings. RIBuild addresses the most difficult retrofitting measure of historic buildings: internal thermal insulation. The adaption of knowledge developed by RIBuild contributes to sustainable historic buildings with improved energy efficiency implying an easier conversion of energy supply from inefficient fossil fuels to efficient renewable energy sources. RIBuild also assesses the hygrothermal performance of the building construction, thus no collateral damage occurs; in case of failure an easy roll back of the measures is possible. The guidelines developed in RIBuild strongly support the deep and holistic retrofitting approach which historic buildings face in the coming years.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.47M | Year: 2015

Concerns are growing about how much melting occurs on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), and how much this melting will contribute to sea level rise (1). It seems that the amount of melting is accelerating and that the impact on sea level rise is over 1 mm each year (2). This information is of concern to governmental policy makers around the world because of the risk to viability of populated coastal and low-lying areas. There is currently a great scientific need to predict the amount of melting that will occur on the surface of the GrIS over the coming decades (3), since the uncertainties are high. The current models which are used to predict the amount of melting in a warmer climate rely heavily on determining the albedo, the ratio of how reflective the snow cover and the ice surface are to incoming solar energy. Surfaces which are whiter are said to have higher albedo, reflect more sunlight and melt less. Surfaces which are darker adsorb more sunlight and so melt more. Just how the albedo varies over time depends on a number of factors, including how wet the snow and ice is. One important factor that has been missed to date is bio-albedo. Each drop of water in wet snow and ice contains thousands of tiny microorganisms, mostly algae and cyanobacteria, which are pigmented - they have a built in sunblock - to protect them from sunlight. These algae and cyanobacteria have a large impact on the albedo, lowering it significantly. They also glue together dust particles that are swept out of the air by the falling snow. These dust particles also contain soot from industrial activity and forest fires, and so the mix of pigmented microbes and dark dust at the surface produces a darker ice sheet. We urgently need to know more about the factors that lead to and limit the growth of the pigmented microbes. Recent work by our group in the darkest zone of the ice sheet surface in the SW of Greenland shows that the darkest areas have the highest numbers of cells. Were these algae to grow equally well in other areas of the ice sheet surface, then the rate of melting of the whole ice sheet would increase very quickly. A major concern is that there will be more wet ice surfaces for these microorganisms to grow in, and for longer, during a period of climate warming, and so the microorganisms will grow in greater numbers and over a larger area, lowering the albedo and increasing the amount of melt that occurs each year. The nutrient - plant food - that the microorganisms need comes from the ice crystals and dust on the ice sheet surface, and there are fears that increased N levels in snow and ice may contribute to the growth of the microorganisms. This project aims to be the first to examine the growth and spread of the microorganisms in a warming climate, and to incorporate biological darkening into models that predict the future melting of the GrIS. References 1. Sasgen I and 8 others. Timing and origin of recent regional ice-mass loss in Greenland. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 333-334, 293-303(2012). 2. Rignot, E., Velicogna, I., van den Broeke, M. R., Monaghan, A. & Lenaerts, J. Acceleration of the contribution of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sea level rise. Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L05503, doi:10.1029/2011gl046583 (2011). 3. Milne, G. A., Gehrels, W. R., Hughes, C. W. & Tamisiea, M. E. Identifying the causes of sea-level change. Nature Geosci 2, 471-478 (2009).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IAPP | Award Amount: 1.38M | Year: 2012

The overall goal of LaScISO (Large Scale Industrial Structural Optimisation for Advanced Applications) is to enhance structural optimisation methods to be capable of optimisation with current industrial state-of-the-art simulation techniques, i.e. to optimize what can be simulated. This requires a tight cooperation between leading research institutions and industry within the fields of numerical optimisation, structural mechanics and software engineering. Current industrial structural optimisation software packages are capable of optimizing linear static and modal finite element (FE) modelled structures. The optimisation is mainly carried out by the CAE (computer aided engineering) simulation groups which are typically also in charge of carrying out more complex simulations involving multiphysics effects and different types of nonlinearities. The demand for optimisation tools which can handle the latter is obvious because many effects can only be investigated and controlled by using these analysis methods. To solve these optimisation problems in an efficient and flexible way, sensitivity based optimisation methods must be extended to cope with multiphysics and nonlinearities. This requires skill in development of new methods and software capabilities. With the consortium consisting of different specialists within the project area, it will be ensured that all skills needed to overcome the current limitation are available such that current state-of-the-art large scale simulations may be used directly in optimisation with good performance. The benefit of LaScISO is a faster and more cost-efficient simulation driven European product development. The optimisation methods will provide a competitive advantage over non-European developers to create low-weight, CO2-saving high quality products within a shorter development time.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-3-2015 | Award Amount: 19.94M | Year: 2015

The science of materials has always been at the centre of scientific and technological progress in human development. The tools to understand materials that fashion them to meet our societal needs have been just as important. Thermal neutrons are one of the most powerful probes that look directly at the structure and dynamics of materials from the macro- to the microscopic scale and from nano-seconds to seconds. It is therefore natural that a group of 17 European Partner Countries have joined together to construct the worlds most powerful neutron source, the European Spallation Source (ESS). The importance of ESS has been recognised by ESFRI who have prioritised it as one of three Research Infrastructures (RIs) for this INFRADEV-3 call. However, simply constructing the most powerful spallation neutron source will not, by itself, ensure the maximum scientific or technological impact. What is needed is an integrated program that ensures that key challenges are met in order to build an ESS that can deliver high impact scientific and technological knowledge. With a timeline of 36 months, involving 18 Consortium Partners and a budget of 19.941.964, the BrightnESS proposal will ensure that (A) the extensive knowledge and skills of European companies, and institutes, are best deployed in the form of In-Kind Contributions to ESS for its construction and operation, (B) that technology transfer both to, and from, the ESS to European institutions and companies is optimised and, (C) that the maximum technical performance is obtained from the ESS target, moderators and detectors in order to deliver world class science and insights for materials technology and innovation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME-AG | Phase: SME-2013-2 | Award Amount: 2.58M | Year: 2013

3 billion tonnes of biomass waste are produced each year in the European Union. From these, a substantial amount is organic waste. These wet biomass waste streams are abundantly available in Europe, while their disposal and recycling becomes increasingly difficult as energy efficient, environmentally sound and economically viable processes hardly exist. The existing treatment methods for these streams are mainly incineration or landfilling. A small amount is composted, digested anaerobically or used as animal fodder. Based on Council Directive 1999/31/EC biowaste with more than 3% organic content is no longer accepted for landfilling as the directive is intended to prevent or entirely reduce the adverse effects of waste landfilling on the environment by introducing strict technical requirements. It limits even further the legal ways for biowaste disposal and sets the basis for developing new technologies for its reuse. By 2020 the EU Member States could be generating 45% more waste than in 1995. Following this the Waste Framework Directive sets the basic concepts and definitions related to waste management. The concept behind NEWAPP is that wet biomass can be a resource more than a waste and does not need to be disposed of in the costly and inefficient way it is nowadays. The alternative is to create a continuous system which will allow to recover heat in an energy efficient for tailor made HTC products way. NEWAPP will gather international researchers, industrial associations and SMEs from different EU countries in its thirty months lifecycle to assess the requirements and constraints of SME-AGs in the reuse of wet biomass with HTC, analyse the potentials of the different wet biomass streams for using them for HTC, perform intensive testing with this innovative system technology for heat recovery and efficiency for tailor made HTC products launch a standardization process for the two most promising waste streams to prove their viability for commercial applications.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BIOTEC-2-2015 | Award Amount: 7.09M | Year: 2016

Omics data is not leveraged effectively in the biotechnology industry due to lack of tools to rapidly access public and private data and to design cellular manipulations or interventions based on the data. With this project we aim to make a broad spectrum of omics data useful to the biotechnology industry covering application areas ranging from industrial biotechnology to human health. We will develop novel approaches for integrative model-based omics data analysis to enable 1) Identification of novel enzymes and pathways by mining metagenomic data, 2) Data-driven design of cell factories for the production of chemicals and proteins, and 3) Analysis and design of microbial communities relevant to human health, industrial biotechnology and agriculture. All research efforts will be integrated in an interactive web-based platform that will be available for the industrial and academic research and development communities, in particular enhancing the competitiveness of biotech SMEs by economizing resources and reducing time-to-market within their respective focus areas. The platform will be composed of standardized and interoperable components that service-oriented bioinformatics SMEs involved in the project can reuse in their own products. An important aspect of the platform will be implementation of different access levels to data and software tools allowing controlling access to proprietary data and analysis tools. Two end-user companies will be involved in practical testing of the platform built within the project using proprietary omics data generated at the companies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 4.06M | Year: 2013

We will provide the first-ever research training in the transdisciplinary area of Microbial Resource Management and Engineering (MRME) to develop new concepts and technologies to meet the imminent societal challenge of closing the Urban Water Cycle (UWC), the sustainable management of residual waters and the preparation and distribution of safe potable water. The network consists of 10 regional world-leading Network Partners (NP) from private and academic sectors in DK, BE, UK, PT, CH, SE, complemented by 8 associated partners. Transdisciplinary training of 13 ESR and one ER will span from (molecular) microbial ecology to environmental engineering. Each ESR develops a personal and professional development plan. Training elements include expert training through cutting-edge individualized research projects, cross-sectoral mentorships, private sector internships, and participation in Network-wide PhD schools. Schools alternate between professional and technical training. The ITN ends with a fellow-led international research symposium. A supervisory board tracks project implementation. The private sector is engaged at the highest level: 4 private partners are full NPs. The ITN will provide ESRs with transsectoral training and experience, and instill an aptitude for research valorization, to create opportunity for research careers in public and private sectors. This ITN is timely, significant, and unique, as scientific and technological advances create tremendous opportunities for MRME, training in this transdisciplinary area is essentially absent across EU, and the need for innovation in closing the UWC is pressing, as water resources dwindle, urban consumption grows, and existing infrastructure ages. The ITN will structure the European research area and strengthen ties between and within the academic and private partners across regions. Researchers will be trained at the highest level with job prospects across academic, private, and public sectors.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.46M | Year: 2013

Large solar heating systems are decisive to cover a major part of European low temperature heat demand by solar energy and therewith to meet European policy aims. However, today only a negligible share of solar heating systems installed in Europe are large units due to manifold technical and socio-economic obstacles. The challenge of solar thermal technology and the overall objective of the proposed initial training network is to supply heat in larger solar heating systems for applications like industrial processes, to feed-in into district heating networks, or sorption drying and cooling. The obstacles will be approached with an innovative inter-disciplinary consortium, including 13 PhD students. Six universities and five private sector participants from six different European countries will provide research and training in cooperation with four associated partners from the private sector. The SHINE project will cover detailed new experimental material-, component- and system studies, system integration analysis and numerical optimization, as well as chemical investigations on storage materials. A close cooperation with industry will ensure fast exploitation of the results. With the SHINE network, the critical mass of PhD students will be gathered on a European level to offer a specialized and structured PhD course programme of large solar heating systems. After the end of SHINE, the key course modules will be offered as a standard curriculum of European PhD education in solar thermal in the long term. The SHINE students will face excellent job perspectives, they will have a sound background in energy economics and complementary skills, regarded as important skills to reach a break through of solar thermal technology.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 4.12M | Year: 2012

In everyday life, people listen to speech under a wide range of conditions that are non-optimal relative to the controlled conditions in laboratory experiments. Classical research methods can only deal with the effects of individual adverse conditions. This has contributed to the fragmentation of speech communication research in numerous sub-disciplines that have little interaction. While each type of adversity can have important consequences on its own, it is often the combination of conditions that conspire to create serious communication problems especially for elderly and hearing impaired persons. The long-term objective of Investigating Speech Processing in Realistic Environments (INSPIRE) is creating a community of researchers who can exploit synergies between the sub-disciplines that investigate individual aspects of speech communication, resulting in a new curriculum: Real-world speech communication. We will develop novel research methods that take advantage of the massive amounts of experimental data that are becoming available and allow for the analysis of communication behaviours in real-world situations characterised by simultaneous presence of multiple adverse conditions. Computational models will be developed that allow to predict speech intelligibility for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners under realistic conditions. INSPIRE will create a permanent collection of measurement data and tools that are accessible for external researchers for testing and comparing speech intelligibility models, thus enabling a breakthrough improvement in hearing instrument tuning. INSPIRE will achieve its objectives by bringing together E(S)Rs with leading academic scientists from the core disciplines in speech communication, R&D personnel from leading companies in acoustics and hearing instruments and ENT specialists from hospitals that treat people with hearing impairments. All research projects in the network will address multiple adverse conditions.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IAPP | Award Amount: 1.18M | Year: 2011

TOX-TRAIN is a 4-year project and its main objective is the development and implementation of a tool box to assess toxicological impacts related to the life-cycle of technologies. The USEtox model, developed under UNEP-SETAC auspices with contributions of the partners in this consortium, will be taken as a starting point. First, TOX-TRAIN will develop and implement estimation tools for emissions and chemical properties to USEtox for a number of compound groups, including ionic and amphiphilic substances, persistent bioaccumulating chemicals or metabolites, pesticides and biocides, substituted musks/fragrances, and metals, with a specific focus on assessing various types of uncertainty in emissions and properties. The compound groups are selected on the basis of use volumes, fate pattern complexity and main emission route relevance. The tools will be developed as open-source software. Second, the USEtox model will be extended with an indoor compartment model for typical exposure situations in working place and household settings as well as direct consumer exposure through a product (e.g. a directly applied cosmetic product). Third, a number of case studies will be performed in close collaboration between the commercial and non-commercial partners of TOX-TRAIN to test the USEtox tool box in practice. Finally, dissemination of the tool box will be done by a portfolio of actions, such as workshops, course developments, training of specific user groups, documentation material, and a user-friendly web-based implementation. In short, TOX-TRAIN will provide an excellent platform to enhance the transfer of knowledge between the commercial and noncommercial sector in the area of toxic life-cycle impact assessment of technologies. It is envisaged that the developed USEtox tool box has a great market potential as it can be directly used in the daily practice of life cycle assessment studies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.1.4 | Award Amount: 13.48M | Year: 2012

Information security threats to organisations have changed completely over the last decade, due to the complexity and dynamic nature of infrastructures and attacks. Successful attacks cost society billions a year, impacting vital services and the economy. Examples include StuxNet, using infected USB sticks to sabotage nuclear plants, and the DigiNotar attack, using fake digital certificates to spy on website traffic. New attacks cleverly exploit multiple organisational vulnerabilities, involving physical security and human behaviour. Defenders need to make rapid decisions regarding which attacks to block, as both infrastructure and attacker knowledge change rapidly.\n\nCurrent risk management methods provide descriptive tools for assessing threats by systematic brainstorming. Attack opportunities will be identified and prevented only if people can conceive them. In todays dynamic attack landscape, this process is too slow and exceeds the limits of human imaginative capability. Emerging security risks demand tool support to predict, prioritise, and prevent complex attacks systematically. The TREsPASS project will make this possible, by building an attack navigator. This navigator makes it possible to say which attack opportunities are possible, which of them are the most urgent, and which countermeasures are most effective. To this end, the project combines knowledge from technical sciences (how vulnerable are protocols and software), social sciences (how likely are people to succumb to social engineering), and state-of-the-art industry processes and tools.\n\nBy integrating European expertise on socio-technical security into a widely applicable and standardised framework, TREsPASS will reduce security incidents in Europe, and allow organisations and their customers to make informed decisions about security investments. This increased resilience of European businesses both large and small is vital to safeguarding the social and economic prospects of Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2010.2.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 9.65M | Year: 2010

EURO-BASIN is designed to advance our understanding on the variability, potential impacts, and feedbacks of global change and anthropogenic forcing on the structure, function and dynamics of the North Atlantic and associated shelf sea ecosystems as well as the key species influencing carbon sequestering and ecosystem functioning. The ultimate goal of the program is to further our capacity to manage these systems in a sustainable manner following the ecosystem approach. Given the scope and the international significance, EURO-BASIN is part of a multidisciplinary international effort linked with similar activities in the US and Canada. EURO-BASIN focuses on a number of key groups characterizing food web types, e.g. diatoms versus microbial loop players; key species copepods of the genus Calanus; pelagic fish, herring (Clupea harengus), mackerel (Scomber scombrus), blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) which represent some of the largest fish stocks on the planet; piscivorous pelagic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) and albacore (Thunnus alalunga) all of which serve to structure the ecosystem and thereby influence the flux of carbon from the euphotic zone via the biological carbon pump. In order to establish relationships between these key players, the project identifies and accesses relevant international databases and develops methods to integrate long term observations. These data will be used to perform retrospective analyses on ecosystem and key species/group dynamics, which are augmented by new data from laboratory experiments, mesocosm studies and field programs. These activities serve to advance modelling and predictive capacities based on an ensemble approach where modelling approaches such as size spectrum; mass balance; coupled NPZD; fisheries; and end to end models and as well as ecosystem indicators are combined to develop understanding of the past, present and future dynamics of North Atlantic and shelf sea ecosystems and their living marine resources.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 4.07M | Year: 2015

The proposed European Training Network, MARmaED, connects science, policy and people and transcends national borders, disciplinary barriers and sectorial divides. By building a greater knowledge base and train the next generation of scientists to think across disciplines, MARmaED contributes to reinforce Europes position as a global leader in marine science and ensure blue growth and sustainable exploitation of marine living resources. The objectives of MARmaED are: - To increase the marine scientific knowledge base by integrating traditionally separate scientific disciplines within a unified learning platform. - To train a new generation of innovative researchers with interdisciplinary experience and skilled in promoting marine science to a wide audience. MARmaED integrates education and research in complementary marine sciences in Norway, Finland, Denmark, the Netherlands, Germany and France. Specifically, the network links state-of-the-art competences in genetics, ecophysiology, ecology, climatology, physical oceanography, statistics and economics. By so doing, the network unifies essential disciplines needed to achieve a good understanding and management of the marine environment. The research will provide new insights into how the cumulative stress from biodiversity loss, climate change and harvesting affects Europes complex marine systems and the consequences for optimal resource use - knowledge that is needed for sustainable, ecosystem-based management. MARmaED has a strong focus on training, with a mobility programme facilitating inter-disciplinarity and training modules of transferrable skills such as communication. Targeted secondments in the non-academic sector will provide the networks students with inter-sectorial training and favourable employment opportunities. MARmaED will thus create novel standards in the training of a new generation of multi-disciplinarily skilled and creative marine scientists, fit to address Europes future challenges.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.3.4 | Award Amount: 3.65M | Year: 2011

Safety-critical systems are important parts of our daily life. Those systems are also called dependable systems, as our lives can depend on them. Examples are controllers in an airplane, breaking controller in a car, or a train control system. Those safety-critical systems need to be certified and the maximum execution time needs to be bounded and known so that response times can be assured when critical actions are needed. Even with high performance processors in our desktop PCs we notice once in a while that the PC is frozen for a few seconds. For a safety-critical system such a pause can result in a catastrophic failure.\nThe mission of T-CREST is to develop tools and build a system that prevents pauses by identifying and addressing the causes for possible pauses. The T-CREST time-predictable system will simplify the safety argument with respect to maximum execution time striving to double performance for 4 cores and to be 4 times faster for 16 cores than a standard processor in the same technology (e.g., FPGA). Thus the T-CREST system will result in lower costs for safety relevant applications reducing system complexity and at the same time faster time-predictable execution.\nStandard computer architecture is driven by the following paradigm: make the common case fast and the uncommon case correct. This design approach leads to architectures where the average-case execution time is optimized at the expense of the worst-case execution time (WCET). Modelling the dynamic features of current processors, memories, and interconnects for WCET analysis often results in computationally infeasible problems. The bounds calculated by the analysis are thus overly conservative.\nWe need a sea change and we shall take the constructive approach by designing computer architectures where predictable timing is a first-order design factor. For real-time systems we propose to design architectures with a new paradigm: make the worst-case fast and the whole system easy to analyse. Despite the advantages of analysable system resources, only a few research projects exist in the field of hardware optimized for the WCET.\nWithin the project we will propose novel solutions for time-predictable multi-core and many-core system architectures. The resulting time-predictable resources (processor, interconnect, memories, etc.) will be a good target for WCET analysis and the WCET performance will be outstanding compared to current processors. Time-predictable caching and time-predictable chip-multiprocessing (CMP) will provide a solution for the need of more processing power in the real-time domain.\nNext to the hardware (processor, interconnect, memories), a compiler infrastructure will be developed in the project. WCET aware optimization methods will be developed along with detailed timing models such that the compiler benefits from the known behaviour of the hardware. The WCET analysis tool aiT will be adapted to support the developed hardware and guide the compilation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: OCEAN.2011-1 | Award Amount: 6.45M | Year: 2012

The rational exploitation of oceans space and resources is increasingly seen as crucial to enhance European competitiveness in key areas such as Renewable Energy and Aquaculture. The H2OCEAN consortium aims at developing an innovative design for an economically and environmentally sustainable multi-use open-sea platform. The H2OCEAN platform will harvest wind and wave power, using part of the energy on-site for multiple applications including a multi-trophic aquaculture farm, and convert on-site the excess energy into hydrogen that can be stored and shipped to shore as green energy carrier. The project builds on already on-going R&D and commercial activities of a partnership involving European leading industrial and academic partners from 5 countries within the fields of renewable energy, fish farming, hydrogen generation, maritime transports and related research disciplines. The unique feature of the H2OCEAN concept, besides the integration of different activities into a shared multi-use platform, lies in the novel approach for the transmission of offshore-generated renewable electrical energy through hydrogen. This concept allows effective transport and storage the energy decoupling energy production and consumption, thus avoiding the grid imbalance problem inherent to current offshore renewable energy systems. Additionally, this concept also circumvents the need for a cable transmission system which takes up a significant investment share for offshore energy generation infrastructures, increasing the price of energy. The envisaged integrated concept will permit to take advantage of several synergies between the activities within the platform significantly boosting the Environmental, Social and Economic potential impact of new maritime activities, increasing employment and strengthening European competitiveness in key economic areas.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.86M | Year: 2013

QuantFung represents the first European training platform for the production of novel bioactive compounds based on fungal synthetic biology. The ITN will train 11 early-stage (ESR) and 4 experienced researchers (ER) as new problem-solving, creative European scientists in interdisciplinary and intersectorial biotechnological research ranging from modelling, network analysis, systems biology (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics), and molecular biology (fungal genetics and biochemistry) to synthetic biology methods. To bridge the gap between science education and industry, industrial partners provide secondments and training modules to share their industry experience with the trainees. The driving force is a collaboration of 8 academic and 5 industrial partners to expedite the application of new secondary metabolites in health, nutrition or agriculture. The objective is to find novel bioactive molecules by exploiting the wealth of fungal biodiversity and to translate these into useful products. Work packages structure training through research focussed on discovery of secondary metabolite gene clusters, targeted activation of gene clusters, quantification of secondary metabolites in industrial hosts, and bioactivity testing to identify their mode of action. These multidisciplinary projects require physical and intellectual mobility and are organised as a structured training program where ESRs/ERs work for defined periods in different QuantFung laboratories and attend local and network training events to broaden their technical knowledge and acquire transferable skills to optimize career options. 46 secondments representing 19 new collaborations between the public and private sector will lead to new avenues of research. The broad spectrum of expertises of QuantFung covers numerous cross sector elements leading to researchers with significant translational and entrepreneurial skills to strengthen European research.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SST-2007-1.1-05 | Award Amount: 27.48M | Year: 2008

The project HERCULES-B is the Phase II of the HERCULES programme, conceived in 2002 as a 7-year strategic R&D Plan, to develop the future generation of optimally efficient and clean marine diesel powerplants. The project is the outcome of a joint vision by the two major European engine manufacturer Groups, MAN Diesel and WARTSILA, which together hold 90% of the worlds marine engine market. The research objectives in HERCULES-B focus on the drastic reduction of CO2 emissions from maritime transport, considering the existing and foreseen composition of the world fleet and fuel infrastructure. The principal aim in HERCULES-B is to reduce fuel consumption of marine diesel engines by 10%, to improve efficiency of marine diesel propulsion systems to a level of more than 60%, and thus reduce CO2 emissions substantially. An additional concurrent aim is towards ultra low exhaust emissions (70% Reduction of NOx, 50% Reduction of Particulates) from marine engines by the year 2020. Today diesel propulsion systems power 99% of the world fleet. HERCULES-B targets the development of engines with extreme operational pressure and temperature parameters, considering the thermo-fluid-dynamic and structural design issues, including friction and wear as well as combustion, air charging, electronics and control, so as to achieve the efficiency / CO2 target. To achieve the emissions target, combustion and advanced aftertreatment methods will be concurrently developed. To improve the whole powertrain, the interaction of engine with the ship, as well as the use of combined cycles in overall system optimization, will be considered. The project HERCULES-B structure of work comprises 54 subprojects, grouped into 13 Tasks and 7 Workpackages, spanning the complete spectrum of marine diesel engine technology. The project HERCULES-B has a total budget of 27M, a duration of 40 months and a Consortium with 32 participants.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: FoF.NMP.2012-5 | Award Amount: 5.19M | Year: 2012

The Hi-Micro project intends to realise an innovative approach for the design, manufacturing and quality control of tool inserts to achieve significant breakthrough in mass production of precision 3D micro-parts, through further developing both enabling manufacturing technologies, including additive manufacturing (AM), micro electrical discharge machining (micro-EDM), micro electro-chemical machining (micro-ECM) and micro-milling, and unique metrology and quality control methods such as computer-tomography (CT) metrology and digital holography. Together with industrial technology providers, the Hi-Micro project will further bolster the performance of industrial equipment for mass production of precision 3D micro-parts, through modular design of tool insert units with improved thermal management capability, development of on-machine handling system and in-line quality control device. Activities will run over the entire value chain of mass production of precision 3D micro-parts, from product and tool insert design, manufacturing of tool inserts, micro injection moulding processes, to the production equipment and quality control in the whole production chain. In order to tackle the identified challenges and critical problems, the Hi-Micro project will provide radical innovations and major breakthroughs as follows: Development of design and tolerance guidelines for advanced micro manufacturing of components (nominal size <1mm) Reliable capability of manufacturing tool inserts with complex internal features for conformal thermal management in micro-injection moulding (IM) and micro powder injection moulding (PIM) Processing technologies and equipment for manufacturing of 3D micro-parts with increased precision and accuracy to ensure smaller tolerances for the products, Metrology methods for complex internal structure and high-speed inline quality control with improved measurement efficiency and without loss of resolution or accuracy.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2013.1.3-1 | Award Amount: 13.58M | Year: 2013

SUN (Sustainable Nanotechnologies) is the first project addressing the entire lifecycle of nanotechnologies to ensure holistic nanosafety evaluation and incorporate the results into tools and guidelines for sustainable manufacturing, easily accessible by industries, regulators and other stakeholders. The project will incorporate scientific findings from over 30 European projects, national and international research programmes and transatlantic co-operations to develop (i) methods and tools to predict nanomaterials exposure and effects on humans and ecosystems, (ii) implementable processes to reduce hazard and exposure to nanomaterials in different lifecycle stages, (iii) innovative technological solutions for risk management in industrial settings, and (iv) guidance on best practices for securing both nano-manufacturing processes and nanomaterials ultimate fate, including development of approaches for safe disposal and recycling. In summary, SUN stands for an integrated approach for the long-term sustainability of nanotechnologies through the development of safe processes for production, use and end-of-life processing of nanomaterials and products, as well as methods reducing both adverse effects and exposure to acceptable levels.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2015

The mid-infrared (mid-IR) wavelength range is an emerging and important new topic for frontier research. Its general importance relates to a multitude of mid-IR industrial and biomedical sensor applications. Chemical finger prints of most complex molecules such as those found in food, tissue or catalytic compounds all have vibrational spectra in the mid-IR, thus identifiable through mid-IR spectroscopy. Incidentally also the fundamental absorption bands of gas molecules are located in the mid-IR enabling novel instrumentation for mid-IR gas spectroscopy at small concentrations relevant for applications like, leak-tests or remote sensing of greenhouse gases. The main obstacle for the exploitation of the mid-IR optical window has been a historical lack of efficient mid-IR excitation light sources and sensitive mid-IR detectors/imaging. In mid-TECH we have gathered the best European academic and industrial partners to show that in a combined effort both technological short comings can be overcome paving the way for novel instrumentation for industry and society. Key elements are novel semiconductor based Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs), rugged mid-IR Optical Parametrical Oscillators combined with novel, record low noise mid-IR upconversion detection and imaging. These two building blocks will be implemented for cancer diagnostics, for combustion analysis and absorption/DIAL spectroscopy. Since we are combining frontier research within different mid-IR areas we do not at present have the necessary skilled researchers knowing the combined mid-IR enabling components. It is a main goal of mid-TECH to train 15 ESRs to an outstanding level where they subsequently to their study can act as Europes new cross-sectorial technical experts in mid-IR technology at one hand and at the same time fill in a much needed link between academia and industry. This is realized through entrepreneurial courses and secondments between the mid-TECH partners.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.95M | Year: 2015

A diverse, complex, and poorly characterised community of microorganisms lies at the heart of the wine an industry worth over 220 billion globally. These microorganisms play key roles at all stages of the viniculture and vinification processes, from helping plants access nutrients from the soil, driving their health through protection against pathogens, to fermentation processes that transform the must into wine with its complex array of aromas and flavours. Given this importance, an improved understanding of the microbial community and its interplay will have significant effects on the industry. In recent years, Next Generation DNA sequencing has revolutionised many areas of biology, including microbiology, through conferring the ability to characterise microbes on the deep community scale, through both shotgun and deep amplicon sequencing approaches. To exploit this power for the benefit of the wine industry, we propose MICROWINE, a 15 ESR Marie Curie Actions European Training Network. The network is constructed as a close collaboration between industry and academic partners, around the theme of the microbial communitys role in the wine production process. Through combining microbial metagenomic sequencing with powerful computation analyses, with metadata generated using techniques such as metabolomics and geochemistry, we will study the action of microbes from the plant protection and nutrition, through to wine fermentation process, using samples collected from both Europe and beyond. We will further train the ESRs across a wide range of relevant disciplines, and maximise information transfer through multiple host and academic-industry cosupervision and secondments. In this way, we anticipate contributing to the strength and scientific progress of the wine industry through training of a cohort of leading, interdisciplinary and tightly interconnected scientists at the forefront of modern microbiological, genomic, computational and related techniques.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2015

Metabolism is the foundation of all living organisms. While cells in a population are often phenotypically different, most of our current analytical approaches still probe metabolism only at the population level. Because strong evidence exists that metabolic cell-to-cell heterogeneity has, for instance, disease relevance, researcher from MetaRNA will overcome this severe analytical limitation through exploiting exciting opportunities emerging from the RNA field. Such synergy potential between the metabolism and RNA research fields has until today not been exploited, because they are separated from each other in Europe and worldwide. Through consequently missing research training programs we thus lack experts with combined knowledge in metabolism and RNA. The aim of the MetaRNA proposal is therefore to establish a European Training Network (ETN) that educates specialists for academia and industry - fully trained at the interface of these two fields - in the development and application of RNA-based sensors to investigate metabolism at the single-cell level, to apply these tools for novel biotechnological applications and to provide a framework for their future use in diagnostics and therapeutics. In MetaRNA, eight research groups from the metabolic and RNA fields and six partners from the private sector join forces to create a platform of mobility and training to 15 early-stage researchers (ESRs), by means of customized research projects, exchange of knowhow among researchers and partners, attendance to specialized courses, workshops and conferences, as well as training in complementary skills.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: WASTE-7-2015 | Award Amount: 7.82M | Year: 2016

NoAW : No Agro-Waste. Innovative approaches to turn agricultural waste into ecological and economic assets. Driven by a near zero-waste society requirement, the goal of NoAW project is to generate innovative efficient approaches to convert growing agricultural waste issues into eco-efficient bio-based products opportunities with direct benefits for both environment, economy and EU consumer. To achieve this goal, the NoAW concept relies on developing holistic life cycle thinking able to support environmentally responsible R&D innovations on agro-waste conversion at different TRLs, in the light of regional and seasonal specificities, not forgetting risks emerging from circular management of agro-wastes (e.g. contaminants accumulation). By involving all agriculture chain stakeholders in a territorial perspective, the project will: (1) develop innovative eco-design and hybrid assessment tools of circular agro-waste management strategies and address related gap of knowledge and data via extensive exchange through the Knowledge exchange Stakeholders Platform, (2) develop breakthrough knowledge on agro-waste molecular complexity and heterogeneity in order to upgrade the most widespread mature conversion technology (anaerobic digestion) and to synergistically eco-design robust cascading processes to fully convert agro-waste into a set of high added value bio-energy, bio-fertilizers and bio-chemicals and building blocks, able to substitute a significant range of non-renewable equivalents, with favourable air, water and soil impacts and (3) get insights of the complexity of potentially new, cross-sectors, business clusters in order to fast track NoAW strategies toward the field and develop new business concepts and stakeholders platform for cross-chain valorisation of agro-waste on a territorial and seasonal basis.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-05-2015 | Award Amount: 51.69M | Year: 2016

In order to unlock the full potential of Europes offshore resources, network infrastructure is urgently required, linking off-shore wind parks and on-shore grids in different countries. HVDC technology is envisaged but the deployment of meshed HVDC offshore grids is currently hindered by the high cost of converter technology, lack of experience with protection systems and fault clearance components and immature international regulations and financial instruments. PROMOTioN will overcome these barriers by development and demonstration of three key technologies, a regulatory and financial framework and an offshore grid deployment plan for 2020 and beyond. A first key technology is presented by Diode Rectifier offshore converter. This concept is ground breaking as it challenges the need for complex, bulky and expensive converters, reducing significantly investment and maintenance cost and increasing availability. A fully rated compact diode rectifier converter will be connected to an existing wind farm. The second key technology is an HVDC grid protection system which will be developed and demonstrated utilising multi-vendor methods within the full scale Multi-Terminal Test Environment. The multi-vendor approach will allow DC grid protection to become a plug-and-play solution. The third technology pathway will first time demonstrate performance of existing HVDC circuit breaker prototypes to provide confidence and demonstrate technology readiness of this crucial network component. The additional pathway will develop the international regulatory and financial framework, essential for funding, deployment and operation of meshed offshore HVDC grids. With 35 partners PROMOTioN is ambitious in its scope and advances crucial HVDC grid technologies from medium to high TRL. Consortium includes all major HVDC and wind turbine manufacturers, TSOs linked to the North Sea, offshore wind developers, leading academia and consulting companies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-07-2015 | Award Amount: 6.24M | Year: 2016

Rivers rank among some of the most threatened ecosystems in the world, and are the focus of costly restoration programmes that cost billions to taxpayers. Much of Europe depends on water from rivers for drinking, food production, and the generation of hydropower, which is essential for meeting the EU renewable energy target. Yet only half the EU surface waters have met the WFDs 2015 target of good ecological status, due in part to the fragmentation of habitats caused by tens of thousands of dams and weirs which also pose a flood hazard. Some barriers are old and out of use, but may have historical value, while the life span of others will soon come to an end and may need to be removed. But barriers also provide energy, water, fishing and leisure opportunities, and may also help to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. Improving stream connectivity has been flagged as one of the priorities for more efficient stream restoration but effective rehabilitation of ecosystem functioning in European rivers needs to take the complexity and trade-offs imposed by barriers into account. AMBER will deliver innovative solutions to river fragmentation in Europe by developing more efficient methods of restoring stream connectivity through adaptive barrier management. The project seeks to address the complex challenge of river fragmentation through a comprehensive barrier adaptive management process, based on the integration of programme design, management, and monitoring to systematically test assumptions about barrier mitigation, adapt and learn.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: DS-05-2015 | Award Amount: 8.70M | Year: 2016

The objective of LIGHTest is to create a global cross-domain trust infrastructure that renders it transparent and easy for verifiers to evaluate electronic transactions. By querying different trust authorities world-wide and combining trust aspects related to identity, business, reputation etc. it will become possible to conduct domain-specific trust decisions. This is achieved by reusing existing governance, organization, infrastructure, standards, software, community, and know-how of the existing Domain Name System, combined with new innovative building blocks. This approach allows an efficient global rollout of a solution that assists decision makers in their trust decisions. By integrating mobile identities into the scheme, LIGHTest also enables domain-specific assessments on Levels of Assurance for these identities.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2016

BrainMatTrain focuses on a comprehensive understanding of Parkinsons disease (PD), from basics to translation, fully supported by 8 full partners partner organisation (4 research institutions, 2 hospitals, 2 SMEs) and one partner organisation (SME specialist in device design). This ETN will educate and train 15 Earlty Stage Researchers (ESRs) in functioanlised biomaterials, materials science, functionlisation strategies, molecular biology, stem cell biology, in vitro model systems, in vivo neuroimaging, animal models and prototype design. Recruited ESRs will receive compulsory discipline-specific, generic and complementary transferable skills training. BrainMatTrain will develop multi-modal collagen reservoir scaffolds incorporating moieties targetitng the neuroinflammatoiry and neuroprotective phases of the underlying pathology of Parkinsons disease. The researchers will undertake cross-disciplinary and intersectorial research projects, which when married together will deliver a novel, biomaterial-based, therapeutic device for the treatment of Parkinsons disease. The research training programme is designed to ensure high-calibre graduates, best placed to secure employment in the private or public sector. Fellows will experience both private and public sector research and development environments through a considered secondment plan.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 8.71M | Year: 2012

We propose a technology that will sit at the front-end of sequencing pipelines, present and future, and will significantly enhance the quality and throughput of DNA sequencing. Although much attention has been given to throughput/cost of the sequencing process itself, the same cannot be said for the preparation of samples. Identified bottlenecks are (1) sequencing technologies require days of upfront sample preparation which is further increased when sequencing selected parts of the genome; (2) genome assembly relies on computationally intensive comparisons to the reference genome because existing technologies produce short sequence reads; (3) it is difficult to begin with small amounts of sample material comprising micro-biopsies and single cells. The CELL-O-MATIC project will synergize efforts from SMEs, academics and large companies to address these bottlenecks by developing chip-based systems that process DNA from individual cells, ready for next generation high-throughput sequencing. Single cell analysis has numerous applications in systems biology but we will emphasize DNA isolation and sequencing from circulating tumor cells (CTC), which have a strong prognostic value in cancer management. A second innovation will be to develop methods that enable up to whole chromosome lengths of DNA to be contiguously mapped using nanofluidics. The inclusion of nanofluidics makes the project particularly distinctive and introduces European SMEs to an area that so far has been the domain of US companies. A modular prototype comprising, a chip, fluid and thermal control, sonication and optical detection will be developed. Samples prepared using CELL-O-MATIC technology will be benchmarked in a high throughput environment with samples prepared by existing methods. Finally, the information obtained from the CELL-O-MATIC processed sample material will be validated for its utility as an aid to clinical decision making.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 4.03M | Year: 2016

The main objective of Training4CRM is to train a new generation of 15 highly inter-disciplinary early stage researchers at the highest international level and quality, who will be immediately employable in both the academic and industrial sectors due to their highly sought after cross- and interdisciplinary insights and expertise. Training4CRM addresses existing gaps within Cell-based Regenerative Medicine for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Parkinsons, Huntingtons, Epilepsy), which occur as a result of progressive loss of structure, function and/or death of neurons in the brain. The disorders have a high prevalence and are associated with impairments and disabilities with high emotional, financial and social burden. New scientific discoveries and technologies are needed, and Training4CRM sets out with the ambition to educate and train students within and across different scientific disciplines to be able to master the design, fabrication and testing of completely new tools and materials within the fields of: Micro- and Nanoengineering (nano/microstructures, 3D scaffolds and 3D lab-on-a-chip devices of different materials, geometries, architectures and properties, wireless electronic components; Biotechnology (human stem cells, human induced pluripotent stem cells, optogenetics, tissue engineering; Pre-clinical studies for the purpose of investigating in vivo, in experimental animals, how the developed cells, materials, structures affect the animal at the physiological and behavioral levels, unravelling the therapeutic effects of the developed strategies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.47M | Year: 2017

Alzheimers disease (AD) affects more than 7 million people in Europe and this figure is expected to double every 20 years. Despite intensive efforts, no disease-modifying treatments or preventive strategies are available. The lack of specific, sensitive and minimally invasive diagnostics to identify people with early-stage AD to be included in clinical drug intervention trials is among the main reasons for many notable trial failures. The main challenges in developing the required diagnostics are identification of AD biomarkers and development of their detection techniques. The complex and interdisciplinary nature of the research underlines the need for innovative training of a new generation of researchers in the field. BBDiag responds to such a need and establishes a much-needed ETN for blood based early-AD diagnostics to address these challenges. It brings together leading academic and industrial experts from five major consortia in Europe and uses their synergies to build a triple-i research & training platform with the required multidisciplinary expertise and cutting-edge technologies. BBDiag Fellows will be trained under the Vitae Researcher Development Framework innovatively combined with the BBDiag platform for gaining interdisciplinary scientific and transferable skills as well as personal quality, creative thinking and business mind-set. The ETN has a highly innovative research programme for the discovery of AD biomarkers, development of novel biosensing techniques and point of care tools, and for technological exploitation of the diagnostics. These advances will strongly support improved care provision and development of disease-modifying treatments and preventive strategies for AD patients. More importantly, BBDiag will deliver its first generation of 13 highly-skilled, creative and entrepreneurial Fellows, setting them on a path to successful careers in academia or industry to ensure that the medical and societal challenges imposed by AD are met.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

Understanding the human brain is one of the greatest scientific challenges of our time. Such an understanding can provide profound insights into our humanity, leading to fundamentally new computing technologies, and transforming the diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. Modern ICT brings this prospect within reach. The HBP Flagship Initiative (HBP) thus proposes a unique strategy that uses ICT to integrate neuroscience data from around the world, to develop a unified multi-level understanding of the brain and diseases, and ultimately to emulate its computational capabilities. The goal is to catalyze a global collaborative effort. During the HBPs first Specific Grant Agreement (SGA1), the HBP Core Project will outline the basis for building and operating a tightly integrated Research Infrastructure, providing HBP researchers and the scientific Community with unique resources and capabilities. Partnering Projects will enable independent research groups to expand the capabilities of the HBP Platforms, in order to use them to address otherwise intractable problems in neuroscience, computing and medicine in the future. In addition, collaborations with other national, European and international initiatives will create synergies, maximizing returns on research investment. SGA1 covers the detailed steps that will be taken to move the HBP closer to achieving its ambitious Flagship Objectives.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.94M | Year: 2016

Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a fastgrowing sector with the ability to evoke a revolution in manufacturing due to its almost unlimited design freedom and its capability to produce personalised parts locally and with efficient material use. AM companies however still face technological challenges such as limited precision due to shrinkage and buildin stresses and limited process stability and robustness. Moreover often postprocessing is needed due to the high roughness and remaining porosity. In addition qualified, trained personnel is hard to find. This ITN project will address both the technological and people challenges. To quality assure the parts produced, PAM will, through a close collaboration between industry and academia, address each of the various process stages of AM with a view to implementing good precision engineering practice. To ensure the availability of trained personnel, ESRs will, next to their individual research and complementary skills training, be immersed in the whole AM production chain through handson workshops where they will design, model, fabricate, measure and assess a specific product. The expected impact of PAM thus is: 1. The availability of intersectoral and interdisciplinary trained professionals in an industrial field thats very important for the future of Europe, both enhancing the ESR future career perspectives and advancing European industry. 2. The availability of high precision AM processes through improved layout rules with better use of AM possibilities, better modelling tools for firsttime right processing, possibility for insitu quality control ensuring process stability and, if still needed, optimised postprocessing routes 3. As a result of 1: an increased market acceptance and penetration of AM. 4. Through the early involvement of European industry: a growing importance of the European industrial players in this fastgrowing field. This will help Europe reach its target of 20% manufacturing share of GDP.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: ENV.2010.2.2.1-3 | Award Amount: 1.20M | Year: 2011

EuroMarine is a coordination action that seeks to develop and implement an agreed framework for the long-lasting and durable co-operation between research institutions that were partners in FP6 marine Networks of Excellence in order to achieve further integration of marine research in Europe. Particular areas for cooperation will be: research programming, joint development and use of data bases, training and mobility of researchers, joint programming and use of research infrastructures. The objective is to provide an agreed frame for strong institutional commitment to this durable collaboration. The ultimate aim will be the sustainable integration of marine research and a significant contribution to the structure of the ERA.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2016

The world economy is dependent on fossil resources: oil, gas and coal. The fossil resources are finite and their consumption causes catastrophic environmental changes. Therefore we need to move towards sustainable economy using renewable resources for energy and chemicals production. Via metabolic engineering approach, novel microbial cells can be created that can convert biomass and waste into fuels and chemicals. Metabolic engineering however distinguishes itself from other engineering disciplines by low predictability of the design and long turnover times for the cell factory construction and screening. Therefore there is a need for scientists, who can address these challenges. European Training Network on Predictable and Accelerated Metabolic Engineering Networks (PAcMEN) will be established at 5 renowned European universities and 2 SMEs with participation of 5 industrial and 1 academic partner organizations. In this program 16 PhD students (of which 15 funded by EU contribution) will learn to conduct state-of-the-art research on metabolic engineering of microbial cell factories and learn to commercialize innovations. This will be achieved via collaborative research projects under supervision of top scientists from academia and industry, network training, secondments with network partners, training on innovation and entrepreneurship, and individual career coaching. Altogether, PAcMEN training programme will provide young scientists with the ideal combination of scientific, technological, industrial and management skills to prepare them for their role as breakthrough pioneers in the establishment of tomorrows biorefineries. The PAcMEN project will have an overall positive impact by strengthening the research networks in the area of metabolic engineering, establishing long-term collaborations between the universities and industry, and by creating a framework for future interdisciplinary training programs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2009.5.1.1 | Award Amount: 6.06M | Year: 2010

In post-combustion CO2 capture, a main bottleneck causing significant reduction in power plant efficiency and preventing cost effectiveness is the low flue gas CO2 partial pressure, limiting membrane flux, solvent selection and capacity. In pre-combustion CO2 capture, key bottlenecks are number of processing steps, possible low hydrogen pressure, and high hydrogen fraction in the fuel Global deployment of CO2 capture is restrained by a general need for prior removal of SO2. iCap seeks to remove these barriers by developing new technologies with potential for reducing the current energy penalty to 4-5% points in power plant efficiency, to combine SO2 and CO2 removal, and to reduce the avoidance cost to 15 /tonne CO2. iCap will: Develop solvents forming CO2 hydrates or two liquid phases enabling drastically increased liquid phase CO2 capacity, radically decreasing solvent circulation rates, introducing a new regime in desorption energy requirement, and allowing CO2 desorption at elevated pressures; Develop combined SO2 and CO2 capture systems increasing dramatically the potential for large scale deployment of CCS in BRIC countries and for retrofit in Europe. Develop high permeability/ high selectivity low temperature polymer membranes, by designing ultra thin composite membranes from a polymeric matrix containing ceramic nano particles. Develop mixed proton-electron conducting dense ceramic-based H2 membranes offering the combined advantages of theoretically infinite selectivity, high mechanical strength and good stability. Develop and evaluate novel coal and gas-based power cycles that allows post-combustion CO2 captures at elevated pressures, thus reducing the separation costs radically. Integrate the improved separation technologies in brownfield and greenfield power plants, and in novel power cycles in order to meet the performance and cost targets of the project


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2012.2.3.1 | Award Amount: 19.53M | Year: 2012

The overall objectives of the INNWIND.EU project are the high performance innovative design of a beyond-state-of-the-art 10-20MW offshore wind turbine and hardware demonstrators of some of the critical components. These ambitious primary objectives lead to a set of secondary objectives, which are the specific innovations, new concepts, new technologies and proof of concepts at the sub system and turbine level. The progress beyond the state of the art is envisaged as an integrated wind turbine concept with i) a light weight rotor having a combination of adaptive characteristics from passive built-in geometrical and structural couplings and active distributed smart sensing and control, ii) an innovative, low-weight, direct drive generator and iii) a standard mass-produced integrated tower and substructure that simplifies and unifies turbine structural dynamic characteristics at different water depths. A lightweight blade design will be demonstrated at a MW scale turbine. The drive train innovations include a super conducting generator; pseudo magnetic drive train and a light weight re-design of the bedplate for reduced tower top mass. The superconducting generator technology and the pseudo magnetic drive technology will be demonstrated at relevant scales by participating industry. The concepts are researched individually at the component level but also at the wind turbine system level in an integrated approach. Their benefits are quantified through suitable performance indicators and their market deployment opportunities are concretely established in two dedicated integrating work packages. The consortium comprises of leading Industrial Partners and Research Establishments focused on longer term research and innovation of industrial relevance. The project addresses the heart of the Long Term R&D Programme of the New Turbines and Components strand of the European Wind Initiative (EWI) established under SET-Plan, the Common European Policy for Energy Technologies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2011.5.4 | Award Amount: 5.64M | Year: 2012

In this project proposal, industry wide harmonized test procedures for PEFC stacks shall be developed and validated. The proposal builds on experiences gained in the FCTESTNET, FCSTEQA series of projects taking up the methodology developed there and expanding it to the test of PEFC stacks. Furthermore, experiences of individual consortium members have long time experience in international standardization. Performance / functional, durability and safety outputs for vehicle propulsion, stationary and portable applications shall be addressed. Generic test modules addressing the effects of outputs to the variation of a single test parameter shall be defined and experimentally validated on a stack level. From these building blocks, selected application oriented test programs shall be derived and validated as well. A two phase approach is pursued starting with an initial selection and definition phase followed by experimental validation. Subsequently, a review is carried out followed by a second validation phase. The consortium mainly consists of experienced research organizations, all working in close contact with and providing testing services to industry. The test modules and test programs are expected to be methodologically sound and independent. Contact to industrial practice will be established by the implementation of an industrial advisory group consisting of selected key stakeholders along the value chain of the fuel cell industry. The consortium will liaise with international standardization activities and contribute to the improvement of existing standards by pre-normative research and if deemed necessary initiate new work item proposals on performance and endurance testing of PEFC stacks.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: FCH2-IA | Phase: FCH-03.2-2015 | Award Amount: 7.25M | Year: 2016

BIG HIT will create a replicable hydrogen territory in Orkney (Scotland) by implementing a fully integrated model of hydrogen production, storage, transportation and utilisation for heat, power and mobility. BIG HIT will absorb curtailed energy from two wind turbines and tidal turbines on the islands of Eday and Shapinsay, and use 1.5MW of PEM electrolysis to convert it into ~50 t pa of hydrogen. This will be used to heat two local schools, and transported by sea to Kirkwall in 5 hydrogen trailers, where it will be used to fuel a 75kW fuel cell (which will provide heat and power to the harbour buildings, a marina and 3 ferries when docked), and a refuelling station for a fleet of 10 fuel cell vehicles. The project employs a novel structure to manage the hydrogen trading, and dissemination that includes a follower territory and associations of over 1640 isolated territories.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2009.3.3.2.1 | Award Amount: 4.49M | Year: 2009

LC-IMPACT is a 3.5-year project and its main objective is the development and application of life cycle impact assessment methods, characterisation and normalisation factors. Impact from land use, water use, marine, mineral and fossil resource use, ecotoxicity and human toxicity, and a number of non-toxic emission-related impact categories will be considered in LC-IMPACT. First, new impact assessment methods will be developed for categories that are not (commonly) included in life cycle impact assessments and categories for which model uncertainties are very high, i.e. land use, water exploitation, resource use, and noise. Second, LC-IMPACT will provide spatially explicit characterisation factors based on global scale models for land use, water exploitation, toxicants, priority air pollutants, and nutrients. Thirdly, parameter uncertainty and value choices will be assessed for impact categories with high uncertainties involved, such as ecotoxicity and human toxicity. Fourthly, ready-to-use characterisation factors will be calculated and reported. Fifthly, normalisation factors for Europe and the world will be calculated for the impact categories included. Sixthly, the improved decision support of the new characterisation factors and normalisation factors will be demonstrated in the context of the following three case studies: i) food production (fish, tomatoes, margarine), ii) paper production and printing, and iii) automobile manufacturing and operation. Finally, verification and dissemination of the new life cycle impact assessment methods and factors will be done by a portfolio of actions, such as stakeholder consultation, a project website, workshops, course developments, and training of user groups. In short, LC-IMPACT will provide improved, globally applicable life cycle impact assessment methods, characterisation and normalisation factors, that can be readily used in the daily practice of life cycle assessment studies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2007-3.5-2 | Award Amount: 8.47M | Year: 2008

The objective of the project COTECH is to investigate new approaches of -manufacturing based on advanced technology convergence processes and to propose hybrid solutions for high added value cost effective -manufacturing emerging applications. The main goals of COTECH are to develop: (1) -replication technologies underpinned by emerging tool-making technologies for processing multi-material components and creating: a) 3D -components using high throughput multi-material -injection moulding with sub-m resolution; b) 2D -components using direct multi-material hot or UV embossing with a sub-200nm resolution. (2) Radically new replication convergent technologies combining the capabilities of -injection or embossing to a complementary activation step to create intelligent devices in a single process step: a) Hybrid processes based on -injection moulding using modules of e.g coating and compression injection moulding, to provide functionality to -devices, such as active coatings and combination of micro and nano features in a single step; b) Ultimately the hybrid processes based on -injection with embossing will be validated. This will offer a very high throughput multimaterial -injection that will enable the fabrication of 3D high aspect ratio -parts, complemented by an embossing step to allow ultra precise 2D features. (3) Global process chains with increased MTBF (50%) and fabrication of high quality products. This requires innovative non-destructive inspection solutions and simulation models. (4) High added value -devices with advanced functionalities. COTECH proposes to validate industrially the new technology convergence processes with 8 demonstrators representing the most emergent industrial sectors (transport, biomedical, energy). The expected market for the industry exceeds 1 Billion . COTECH will also address the problem of knowledge fragmentation by activating a polymer -manufacturing sub-platform as support to MINAM.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2008-1.2-1 | Award Amount: 11.36M | Year: 2009

Biotechnologically derived substances for large scale feed, food and pharma applications represent one of the most important sources of new products due to their precisely controlled structural and functional properties, potential for economic and responsible production and overall broad benefits to society through biocompatibility and sustainability. The costs of producing biomaterials are in many cases dominated by separation processes, which can constitute 80% of the total cost of production. Using smart magnetic adsorbent particles to selectively separate the target product out of a complex product mixture like the fermentation broth or bio-feed stock can drastically reduce costs. By using magnetic separation and extraction technologies to separate the magnetic carrier particles, novel processing ways emerge. The main objective of the MagProLife project is to scale-up innovative nanotechnology based processes defined in the previous NanoBioMag Project, funded by the EU under the FP6 programme (NMP3-CT-2005-013469), to pilot-line-scale and demonstrate those for bio, food and pharma applications. Link to market needs is represented by a preliminary product selection of natural soy based nutraceuticals or pharmaceuticals like Bowman-Birk Inhibitor (BBI), a proteases inhibitor for MS-treatment, and Lunasin which is in discussion to have anti-carcinogenic properties as well as recombinant proteins and nucleic acids (Fragment-Antibody-Binding and Phytase). The Consortium is driven by the potential the magnetic separation technology has for improving the value-chain in industrial production for emerging biotech, food and pharma markets.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2010.3.3-02 | Award Amount: 10.64M | Year: 2011

BIONEXGEN will develop the next generation of biocatalysts to be used for eco-efficient manufacturing processes in the chemical industry. A collaboration by industrial and academic partners have identified the key technology fields of amine synthesis, polymers from renewable resources, glycoscience and wider oxidase application as four key areas where the next generation of biocatalysts that will lead to improvements in both economic and environmental performance of the chemical manufacturing industries. This project will enable industry to use renewable resources with reduced greenhouse gas production as compared to their fossil counterparts and deliver biotechnological routes with reduced energy consumption and less toxic wastes compared to conventional chemical processes. Routes to specialised, high-value chemicals (e.g. chiral chemical compounds) normally require long chemical synthetic routes involving complex reaction steps with toxic side products and waste streams and this project will allow these methods to be replaced by clean biocatalysis routes. To broaden the range of fine and speciality chemicals and intermediates produced by biotechnological routes, research will address: (i) design and optimisation of enzymes to be used in synthetic chemistry, (ii) the selection/development of modified microorganisms which are resistant to heat, pressure or low pH when used in the production of chemical entities and allow (iii) the integration of biotechnological steps into conventional chemical processes. The project will develop and integrate with chemical steps the biotechnological manufacturing routes for the synthesis of fine and speciality chemicals especially amines, oligosaccharides and renewable polymer intermediates which are better in terms of eco-efficiency, economic potential, complexity and /or specificity of the synthetic pathways than those currently employed. Dissemination strategy will enhance the impact of this work through three separate initiatives. Economic viability and eco-efficiency will be evaluated and assessed on a quantitative basis and these results will be published in the scientific literature. Green chemistry initiatives in the BIONEXGEN project and the FP7 contributions will be presented to the wider public on a project website and through material displays at the museum in Manchester and the Big Saturday event in Manchester Science Week. An overall end of project meeting in Brussels will invite a range of political decision makers and industry leaders to attend and will ensure maximum impact. The project was devised with a strong involvement of industrial partners, in particular SMEs and is strength of this project and will contribute significantly to ensure application of the technology. This combination of technical will lead to the development of new green chemical manufacturing technology platforms that will be tested for specific targets in the European chemical manufacturing industries and use these as case studies for dissemination on a broad front.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2012.6.6-1 | Award Amount: 2.26M | Year: 2012

The overall aim of ECO-India is to design and develop innovative cost-effective solutions for community- based water- and wastewater- treatment systems. These systems will be deployed at pilot sites in arsenic-affected water-stressed regions in India. The two consortia, Indian (DST) and European (FP7), will establish pilot schemes for catchment area and reservoir management surface water supply schemes arsenic removal (including monitoring using UFZs field-tested Arsolux arsenic sensor) disinfection treatment for potable water based on Trustwaters EC-certified mixed-oxidant generation systems. online monitoring of water quality water distribution network, together with online/offline water quality monitoring programmes sewerage and wastewater treatment. In addition, prototype energy-efficient modules for water deionisation and heavy metal removal will be developed. A feasibility study will be performed to assess the potential for energy harvesting from sludge.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: NMP-22-2015 | Award Amount: 8.05M | Year: 2016

BIO4SELF aims at fully biobased self-reinforced polymer composites (SRPC). To produce the SRPCs two polylactic acid (PLA) grades are required: a low melting temperature (Tm) one to form the matrix and an ultra high stiffness and high Tm one to form the reinforcing fibres. To reach unprecedented stiffness in the reinforcing PLA fibres, we will combine PLA with bio-LCP (liquid crystalline polymer) for nanofibril formation. Further, we will increase the temperature resistance of PLA and improve its durability. This way, BIO4SELF will exploit recent progress in PLA fibre technology. We will add inherent self-functionalization via photocatalytic fibres (self-cleaning properties), tailored microcapsules (self-healing properties) and deformation detecting fibres (self-sensing). Prototype composite parts for consumer goods, automotive and home appliances will be demonstrators to illustrate the much broader range of industrial applications, e.g. furniture, construction and sports goods. Our developments will enable to use biobased composites for high end applications, thus contributing to using sustainable and renewable raw materials. Being able to produce, process and sell these novel SRPCs and related composite intermediates will be a clear competitive advantage. First estimates predict a market of at least 35 kton/year, corresponding to ca. 165 M, within 5 years. Using the PLA SRPCs, BIO4SELF will demonstrate the successful use of biobased materials in home appliances such as washing machines, which partner ARCELIK intends to commercialise. BIO4SELF is a well balanced mix of end-users (large enterprises to maximise impact), technology providers (mainly R&D driven SMEs), R&D actors (RTDs and universities) and innovation support (specialised SMEs). It covers the required expertise, infrastructure, and industrial know-how to realise the innovation potential of the novel high performance biobased SRPCs, both during and beyond the project.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-35-2014 | Award Amount: 1.79M | Year: 2015

Accelerating Entrepreneurial Learning across European Regions There are a number of profound challenges facing the European Union. Despite the single market being in existence for quite some time, start-ups and entrepreneurs tend not to think European wide and business scaling is very fragmented. The entrepreneurial ecosystem is also fragmented and not joined up between countries. Unemployment levels are very high, with high rates of over 50% of under-25s among Mediterranean countries, such as Spain and Greece. Entrepreneurship in Europe lags behind the US, in terms of effectiveness, scale and impact. Set in this context, the focus of the proposal is to develop more ICT entrepreneurs and this is adopted as the key objectives, which is the core outcomes required from the Horizon 2020 ICT 35 call. Specifically this programme sets out to train ICT entrepreneurs to be incubator ready and this is informed by research into current practice in incubators across Europe. The Horizon 2020 is an ideal opportunity for Europe to enable a different breed of European ICT entrepreneurs. Some of the characteristics of achieving this include the need to spend an appropriate amount of time to allow ICT entrepreneurs develop the commercial skills, as well as the technical proposition. This project will develop a network of ICT entrepreneurship creative physical and virtual spaces and coordinate European wide intensive entrepreneurial action training events called Start-up Scrums between consortia members with international teams. The programme will cultivate a European entrepreneurial mind-set and pilot a Born European Enterprise annual event. It is recognised that ICT enterprises take time to develop the technology. The proposal sets out to engage with 300 ICT students using an intensive training package over 4 months, starting with the start-up Scrums, continuing with virtual support via the EU Virtual Incubator and culminating with the best teams competing in the Born European Enterprise Challenge. A key element of the programme is student exchange as well as staff exchange, which will enable cross-fertilisation. This proposal is thematically focused on creating Born European Enterprises and fulfills the three objectives of the Horizon 2020 2014 ICT 35 a, b & c call: a pan European competition (across over 10 MS), summer schools (Start-up Scrums) and supporting the creation of new virtual and physical ICT creative spaces (Athens). The ICT teams will have opportunities to pursue their new ventures in a number of European incubators, within the consortia. The action will combine ICT physical and virtual entrepreneurship spaces, which facilitate European collaboration and on-going support after workshop events.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.09M | Year: 2013

The project is located in the field of optical fibre sensors - an area where Europe has developed internationally competitive research and commercial activity. The aim is to significantly extend the range of application of optical fibre grating sensors by developing a mature version of the technology in polymer optical fibres and thereby increase European competitiveness. Polymer fibres offer some key advantages over silica, the two most important perhaps being the ability to sense much higher strains and the considerably reduced stiffness of the plastic compared to the glass fibre. Polymers are however complex materials and the properties of a sensor in this material are dependent on all stages of the sensor fabrication process, from initial preform production, through fibre drawing to grating fabrication. In TRIPOD we have brought together an interdisciplinary scientific team with expertise covering all aspects of the sensor fabrication path to enable us to obtain a full understanding of the process, with the aim of enabling us to produce optimised grating sensors, efficiently, repeatably and reliably. Integral to the programme are end-user companies who will provide direction on sensor development and training to the researchers on business issues, as well as familiarising themselves with the new technology, enabling them to expand their business models. In addition, we include technology innovators to open up further applications and potential markets.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.1-01 | Award Amount: 9.55M | Year: 2013

Plants synthesize a staggering variety of secondary metabolites, and this chemodiversity is a poorly used pool of natural molecules with bioactive properties of importance for applications in the pharma and food industries. BacHBerry focusses on phenolic compounds, a large and diverse class of plant metabolites, which are currently in the spotlight due to their claimed beneficial effects in prevention and treatment of chronic diseases, but that also have applications as cosmetics, flavours and food colorants etc. Berries are soft and colourful fruits, with great diversity, high content and unique profiles in phenolic compounds, making them a major source of these high-value metabolites. The BacHBerry project aims to develop a portfolio of sustainable methodologies to mine the potential of the untapped biodiversity of the bioactive phenolic compounds in an extensive collection of berry species. Full exploitation of this unrivalled natural resource requires an integrated and comprehensive effort from bioprospecting in berries using SMART high-throughput screens for the valorisation of phenolic bioactivities aligned with their identification using cutting edge analytics and subsequent elucidation of their biosynthetic pathways. This knowledge will facilitate metabolic engineering of suitable bacterial hosts for high-value phenolics production in scalable fermentation bioprocesses, ultimately serving as commercial production platforms. The consortium comprises a full chain of research and innovation, with 12 research groups, 5 SMEs and a large enterprise, representing 10 countries including partners from ICPC countries Russia, Chile and China, with the capacity to exploit novel bioactivities from berry fruits diversity. BacHBerry develops a pipeline of sustainable and cost-effective processes to facilitate production of added-value berry phenolics with immediate potential for commercialization and consequent socio-economic benefits for the European community and beyond.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.17 | Award Amount: 9.41M | Year: 2010

EXPEER will bring together, major observational, experimental, analytical and modelling facilities in ecosystem science in Europe. By uniting these highly instrumented ecosystem research facilities under the same umbrella and with a common vision, EXPEER will form a key contribution to structuring and improving the European Research Area (ERA) within terrestrial ecosystem research. EXPEER builds on an ambitious plant for networking research groups and facilities. The joint research activities will provide a common framework and roadmap for improving the quality, interaction and individual as well as joint performance of these infrastructures in a durable and sustainable manner. EXPEER will provide a framework for increased use and exploitation of the unique facilities through a strong and coordinated programme for Transnational Access to the infrastructures. Extensive outreach and collaboration with related networks, infrastructures as well as potential funding bodies will ensure that EXPEER will contribute with its key experiences to the shaping and designing of future research networks and infrastructures, and that it has full support from all stakeholders in reaching its long-term objectives. The establishment of the EXPEER Integrated Infrastructure will enable integrated studies of the impacts of climate change, land use change and loss of biodiversity in terrestrial ecosystems through two major steps: 1. Bringing together the EXPEER Infrastructures to enable collaboration and integration of observational, experimental and modelling approaches in ecosystem research (in line with the concept developed in ANAEE); 2. Structuring existing network of ecosystem observational, monitoring and experimental sites across Europe (LTER-Europe). Through its integrated partnership, uniting both the experimental, observational, analytical and modelling research communities, EXPEER has the multidisciplinary expertise and critical mass to integrate and structure the European long-term ecosystem research facilities providing improved services and benefits to the whole research community as well as the society in general.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.2-01 | Award Amount: 13.29M | Year: 2012

The PharmaSea project focuses on obstacles in marine biodiscovery research, development and commercialization and brings together a broad interdisciplinary team of academic and industry researchers and specialists to address and overcome these. The partners are ideally placed to demonstrate how to widen the bottlenecks and increase the flow of ideas and products derived from the marine microbiome towards a greater number of successes in a larger number of application areas. Despite the tremendous potential of marine biodiscovery, exploitation, particularly at a commercial scale, has been hampered by a number of constraints. These relate to access (physical and legal), genetics of the organisms, compound isolation, structure elucidation, early reliable validation of biological activity and best mechanisms of flow-through into exploitation. PharmaSea will solve these chronic bottlenecks by developing essential actions beyond the state of the art and linking them with best practice and appropriate pragmatic approaches. The robust pipeline structure established within PharmaSea will process a wide genetic basis including marine microbial strain collections held by partners and new strain collections from extreme environments (deep, cold and hot vent habitats) to produce new products with desirable characteristics for development by the SME partners in three accessible market sectors, health (infection, inflammation, CNS diseases), personal care and nutrition. The global aim of PharmaSea is to produce two compounds at larger scale and advance them to pre-clinical evaluation. To address relevant challenges in marine biodiscovery related to policy and legal issues, PharmaSea will bring together practitioners, legal experts, policy advisors/makers and other stakeholders, focusing on the feasibility of harmonising, aligning and complementing current legal frameworks with recommendations and ready to use solutions tailored to marine biodiscovery.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra-PP | Phase: INFRA-2010-2.2.6 | Award Amount: 5.05M | Year: 2010

The EU-OPENSCREEN Preparatory Phase forms the basis for the construction and operation of a pan-European infrastructure of open screening platforms for Chemical Biology. EU-OPENSCREEN will bring together leading laboratories from 14 European countries covering all aspects of Chemical Biology from high-throughput screening with a dedicated compound library to assay development, chemical synthesis for hit-optimisation, bio-profiling and in vivo studies, as well as a central database, training for scientists and platform staff and dissemination activities. The infrastructure will be used by researchers from universities, research institutes and SMEs across Europe, who either have only limited in-house facilities or no access at all to such resources and expertise. The EU-OPENSCREEN infrastructure will keep Europe at the forefront of the biological and medical sciences and will stimulate industrial research and commercial exploitation. In order to prepare the creation of an efficient network of centres which provide users with optimal resources, the EU-OPENSCREEN Preparatory Phase will address the following issues: - A user-focused access strategy. - The physical infrastructure requirements. - Suitable data standards and the framework for a database to archive and make the results available to the scientific community. - A financial management plan for the construction and sustainable operation of the infrastructure in co-operation with national funding bodies. - The legal approach regarding intellectual property issues. - An appropriate legal and governance structure. - The development of a Chemical Biology education package to ensure adequate training of scientists and platform staff. - A central Chemical Biology information gateway in form of a website. - The dissemination of the business plan to stakeholders and decision makers and co-ordination with national funding strategies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2007-2-5-05 | Award Amount: 7.37M | Year: 2009

MYCORED aims at developing strategic solutions to reduce contamination by mycotoxins of major concern in economically important food and feed chains. The following toxins and commodities are especially considered in the project: aflatoxins, trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins in wheat/maize food and feed chains; ochratoxin A in the grape-wine and wheat chains; and aflatoxins in the dried fruit chain. Novel methodologies, efficient handling procedures and information, dissemination and educational strategies are considered in a context of multidisciplinary integration of know-how and technology to reduce mycotoxins exposure worldwide. Five work-packages (WPs) will develop novel solution driven strategies to reduce both pre-and post-harvest contamination in feed and food chains. They involve: i) optimization of plant resistance and fungicide use; ii) biocontrol to reduce toxigenic fungi in cropping systems, iii) predictive modelling and optimise logistics; iv) novel post-harvest and storage practices and v) application of new food processing technologies. Two horizontal WPs will develop enabling methodologies for i) advanced diagnostics and quantitative detection of toxigenic fungi and ii) rapid and multi-toxin detection of mycotoxins and relevant biomarkers. The project will significantly build on the outcome of several European projects (through most coordinators/partners of FP5 and FP6) on mycotoxins by supporting, stimulating and facilitating education and cooperation with countries having major mycotoxin concerns related to (international) trade and human health. The direct involvement of ICPC countries (Argentina, Egypt, Russia, South Africa, Turkey) and international organizations (CIMMYT,IITA) together with strong alliances with major research institutions in the USA (3 USDA Centers/5 Universities), Australia, Malaysia will strengthen the project through sharing experiences and resources from several past/ongoing mycotoxin projects in a global context.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-11-2015 | Award Amount: 5.98M | Year: 2016

Bladder cancer is among the most expensive diseases in oncology in terms of treatment costs; each procedure requires days of hospitalisation and recurrence rates are high. Current unmet clinical needs can be addressed by optical methods due to the combination of non-invasive and real-time capture of unprecedented biomedical information. The MIB objective is to provide robust, easy-to-use, cost-effective optical methods with superior sensitivity and specificity to enable a step-change in point-of-care diagnostics of bladder cancer. The concept relies on combining optical methods (optical coherence tomography, multi-spectral opto-acoustic tomography, shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy, and multiphoton microscopy) providing structural, biochemical and functional information. The hypothesis is that such combination enables in situ diagnosis of bladder cancer with superior sensitivity and specificity due to unprecedented combined anatomic, biochemical and molecular tissue information. The step-change is that this hybrid concept is provided endoscopically for in vivo clinical use. The project relies on development of new light sources, high-speed imaging systems, unique imaging fibre bundles, and endoscopes, combined and applied clinically. The consortium comprises world-leading academic organisations in a strong partnership with innovative SMEs and clinical end-users. Through commercialization of this novel imaging platform, MIB is expected to reinforce leading market positions in medical devices and healthcare for the SMEs in areas where European industry is already strong. The impact is that improved diagnostic procedures facilitate earlier onset of effective treatment, thus recurrence and follow-up procedures would be reduced by 10%, i.e., reducing costs. Using MIB technology, healthcare cost savings in the order of 360M are expected for the whole EU. Equally important, prognosis and patient quality of life would improve drastically.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-03-2016 | Award Amount: 1.53M | Year: 2016

Climaterelated tools, products, data and services may greatly contribute to climate change mitigation and adaptation. However, current strategies face knowledge gaps, lack of visibility of climate services, and low awareness of key potential customers for using key information and the associated economic benefits. This reality triggers the need and potential for developing a global market for climate services. The MArket Research for a Climate services Observatory (MARCO) proposal gathers market research firms, climate scientists, climate services practitioners, and innovation actors, around the Climate-KIC, to provide a detailed insight into the market for climate services in Europe, in line with the challenge of enabling market growth outlined in the ECs R&I roadmap for climate services. The projects key objectives are to: assess the EU market of climate services; validate and enrich the market assessment with case studies; forecast future user needs and assess market growth until 2030; unveil opportunities and promote market growth. To achieve this, MARCO will build on a phased approach with feedback loops between several methodologies to ensure validation of findings. This will start with defining the framework for market characterisation, followed by exhaustive, integrated market research combining climate vulnerability analysis deriving into potential market estimation, confronted to actual transactional market quantification, qualitative surveys, and nine case studies on specific sectors and regions. This will be followed by a gap analysis and innovation modelling to reveal the untapped market. A foresight exercise will then outline market growth till 2030. Finally, recommendations for market observation and facilitation will be expressed. Stakeholders will be involved at all points of the process, with a continuous dialogue network and two workshops. The Climate KIC and partners will ensure sound dissemination of results, all made public.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-29-2016 | Award Amount: 4.12M | Year: 2016

LEDLUM develops a highly integrated very cost competitive light engine technology platform for Solid State Lighting (SSL) connected directly to the electrical power grid. The new platform reduces size by 90%, material cost by more than 50% and losses by 20% compared to state-of-the-art solutions. Further LED-Drivers are the limiting factor for SSL Engines in reliability, lifetime and maintenance. The root cause is the electrolytic capacitor; whose removal is essential to increase the lifetime of LED drivers to match the LEDs (100.000 hrs). This is not practically possible with existing components and circuits, but combining the very high frequency (VHF=30-300MHz) technology with innovative energy-storage-concepts enable LEDLUM to achieve this. Based on this new VHF-approach LEDLUM uses embedding technology for both magnetic and capacitive components, hence enabling integration of light-source and driver/control-electronics on the same substrate. In 2020 the European LED-luminaire market will grow to 9B. and the corresponding LED-driver market to approx. 820M. LEDLUM addresses the size-driven and low-to-medium power luminaires with a potential of 90M. This will generate additional business and employees in Europe, as the LEDLUM-approach replaces the older technology made in other countries, which increasingly swash into Europe. The impact is even bigger if the European companies address the potential of 350M worldwide. To achieve these highly ambitious goals, LEDLUM unites leading players in the field of VHF, integration, LED-Driver and light-fixture-design from science and industry in a well-balanced and intensive collaboration. The drastic size reduction enabled by the innovative technology platform in LEDLUM is a direct response to the Breakthrough in miniaturization of SSL light engines and systems contained in the RIA of the ICT29 call. By developing the worlds smallest Light Engine, LEDLUM establish Europe as the world leading innovator in SSL solutions.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BG-09-2016 | Award Amount: 15.49M | Year: 2016

The overall objective of INTAROS is to develop an integrated Arctic Observation System (iAOS) by extending, improving and unifying existing systems in the different regions of the Arctic. INTAROS will have a strong multidisciplinary focus, with tools for integration of data from atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere and terrestrial sciences, provided by institutions in Europe, North America and Asia. Satellite earth observation data plays an increasingly important role in such observing systems, because the amount of EO data for observing the global climate and environment grows year by year. In situ observing systems are much more limited due to logistical constraints and cost limitations. The sparseness of in situ data is therefore the largest gap in the overall observing system. INTAROS will assess strengths and weaknesses of existing observing systems and contribute with innovative solutions to fill some of the critical gaps in the in situ observing network. INTAROS will develop a platform, iAOS, to search for and access data from distributed databases. The evolution into a sustainable Arctic observing system requires coordination, mobilization and cooperation between the existing European and international infrastructures (in-situ and remote including space-based), the modeling communities and relevant stakeholder groups. INTAROS will include development of community-based observing systems, where local knowledge is merged with scientific data. An integrated Arctic Observation System will enable better-informed decisions and better-documented processes within key sectors (e.g. local communities, shipping, tourism, fisheries), in order to strengthen the societal and economic role of the Arctic region and support the EU strategy for the Arctic and related maritime and environmental policies.


IMMUNOSABR is geared towards opening up a new paradigm in treating metastatic cancer by obtaining clinical proof of concept for a novel bi-modal curative treatment strategy. High precision stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is combined with immunotherapy to form a powerful synergistic anti-tumour strategy. The approach relies on the direct cytotoxic effect of SABR, the abscopal effect of radiation observed at distance from the irradiated metastatic site(s), and the effect of the tumour-specific immunocytokine L19-IL2 (watch our animation explaining the concept at https://youtu.be/6wDE6RkrikA). Palliative treatment is the current standard of care for patients with metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), unless there is an actionable mutation. By using the concept of limited metastatic disease (10 sites, WHO 0-1: oligo\) we aim to develop a therapy with curative intent. IMMUNOSABR will gather evidence for the clinical efficacy of our bi-modal treatment strategy in a multicentre randomised phase II study (clinicaltrials.gov no. NCT02735850) in patients with limited metastatic NSCLC. IMMUNOSABR is complemented by two strong biomarker work packages which focus on developing an ambitious personalised biomarker strategy, to identify patients who can benefit from the novel treatment strategy. This includes promising non-invasive imaging techniques and state-of-the-art immunological monitoring approaches on tumour tissue and blood. IMMUNOSABR will spur further development of L19-IL2 as a commercial drug and translate the bi-modal treatment strategy towards clinical implementation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-10b-2015 | Award Amount: 5.41M | Year: 2016

The overarching goal of VIVALDI is to increase the sustainability and competitiveness of the European shellfish industry by improving the understanding of bivalve diseases and by developing innovative solutions and tools for the prevention, control and mitigation of the major pathogens affecting the main European farmed shellfish species: Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), mussels (Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis), European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis), clams (Venerupis philipinarum) and scallops (Pecten maximus ). The project addresses the most harmful pathogens affecting either one or more of these shellfish species: the virus OsHV-1, Vibrio species including V. aestuarianus, V. splendidus, V. harveyi and V. tapetis, as well as the parasite Bonamia ostreae. The project is committed to provide practical solutions based on the most advanced knowledge. VIVALDI will dissect the disease mechanisms associated with pathogen virulence and pathogenesis and host immune responses, develop in vivo and in vitro models, and apply omic approaches that will help the development of diagnostic tools and drugs against pathogen targets, and breeding programmes in a collaborative effort with industrial partners. The proposal will include a global shellfish health approach, recognising that cultured bivalves are often exposed to several pathogens simultaneously, and that disease outbreaks can be due to the combined effect of two or more pathogens. The proposal will also investigate advantages and risks of the used of disease-resistant selected animals in order to improve consumer confidence and safety. VIVALDI will be both multi- and trans-disciplinary. In order to cover both basic and applied levels from molecules to farm, the proposal will integrate partners with a broad range of complementary expertises in pathology and animal health, epidemiology, immunology, molecular biology, genetics, genomics and food safety.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-29-2016 | Award Amount: 4.28M | Year: 2016

FLAIR aims at developing an airborne, compact and cost-effective air quality sampling sensor for sensitive and selective detection of molecular fingerprints in the 2-5 m and 8-12 m infrared atmospheric windows. The sensor is based on an innovative supercontinuum laser that provides ultra-bright emission across the entire spectrum of interest. Such a light source in combination with a novel type of multipass cell in conjunction with specifically developed uncooled detector arrays will ensure highly sensitive detection. Broadband single-shot 2D high resolution absorption spectra capture will allow highly selective molecular detection in complex gas mixtures in the ppbv levels in real time. This high performance sensor constitutes a breakthrough in the field of trace gas spectroscopy. Moreover, in a hybrid approach, the main spectroscopic sensor will be complemented by a fine particle detector in order to obtain a complete picture of the air quality. Mounted on an adapted and optimized UAV (drone), the sensor will enable pervasive sensing on large scales outside urban environments where air quality monitoring remains challenging, e.g. along gas pipelines or around chemical plants. Also, FLAIR can guide emergency measures in case of chemical fires or leaks, wildfires or volcanic eruptions or even serve for oil and gas exploration or explosives related molecules detection, by far more cost-effectively than for missions on manned research aircraft. As such FLAIR provides a novel and ubiquitous tool addressing air quality related safety issues. The sensor prototype will be tested at TRL 4 in the lab and at TRL 5 on-board a UAV in the context of a well-defined and controlled validation test setting. The project will be carried out by 3 SMEs, 1 industrial partner and 4 RTDs, covering the full value chain (development, implementation and application) of such a sensor for air quality monitoring. Business cases for commercialization routes in a global market will be provided


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: COFUND-EJP | Phase: SC1-PM-05-2016 | Award Amount: 74.06M | Year: 2017

The overarching goal of the European Human Biomonitoring Initiative (HBM4EU) is to generate knowledge to inform the safe management of chemicals and so protect human health. We will use human biomonitoring to understand human exposure to chemicals and resulting health impacts and will communicate with policy makers to ensure that our results are exploited in the design of new chemicals policies and the evaluation of existing measures. Key objectives include: Harmonizing procedures for human biomonitoring across 26 countries, to provide policy makers with comparable data on human internal exposure to chemicals and mixtures of chemicals at EU level; Linking data on internal exposure to chemicals to aggregate external exposure and identifying exposure pathways and upstream sources. Information on exposure pathways is critical to the design of targeted policy measures to reduce exposure; Generating scientific evidence on the causal links between human exposure to chemicals and negative health outcomes; and Adapting chemical risk assessment methodologies to use human biomonitoring data and account for the contribution of multiple external exposure pathways to the total chemical body burden. We will achieve these objectives by harmonizing human biomonitoring initiatives in 26 countries, drawing on existing expertise and building new capacities. By establishing National Hubs in each country to coordinate activities, we will create a robust Human Biomonitoring Platform at European level. This initiative contributes directly to the improvement of health and well-being for all age groups, by investigating how exposure to chemicals affects the health of different groups, such as children, pregnant women, foetuses and workers. We will also investigate how factor such as behavior, lifestyle and socio-economic status influence internal exposure to chemicals across the EU population. This knowledge will support policy action to reduce chemical exposure and protect health.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BG-10-2016 | Award Amount: 8.10M | Year: 2016

Blue-Action will provide fundamental and empirically-grounded, executable science that quantifies and explains the role of a changing Arctic in increasing predictive capability of weather and climate of the Northern Hemisphere.To achieve this Blue-Action will take a transdisciplinary approach, bridging scientific understanding within Arctic climate, weather and risk management research, with key stakeholder knowledge of the impacts of climatic weather extremes and hazardous events; leading to the co-design of better services.This bridge will build on innovative statistical and dynamical approaches to predict weather and climate extremes. In dialogue with users, Blue-Arctic will take stock in existing knowledge about cross-sectoral impacts and vulnerabilities with respect to the occurrence of these events when associated to weather and climate predictions. Modeling and prediction capabilities will be enhanced by targeting firstly, lower latitude oceanic and atmospheric drivers of regional Arctic changes and secondly, Arctic impacts on Northern Hemisphere climate and weather extremes. Coordinated multi-model experiments will be key to test new higher resolution model configurations, innovative methods to reduce forecast error, and advanced methods to improve uptake of new Earth observations assets are planned. Blue-Action thereby demonstrates how such an uptake may assist in creating better optimized observation system for various modelling applications. The improved robust and reliable forecasting can help meteorological and climate services to better deliver tailored predictions and advice, including sub-seasonal to seasonal time scales, will take Arctic climate prediction beyond seasons and to teleconnections over the Northern Hemisphere. Blue-Action will through its concerted efforts therefore contribute to the improvement of climate models to represent Arctic warming realistically and address its impact on regional and global atmospheric and oceanic circulation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-29-2016 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2016

The project GALAHAD targets the critical need for better glaucoma diagnostic systems. Glaucoma is an age-related major cause of blindness. The eye disease is characterized by an irreversible damage to the optic nerve head caused by increased intra-ocular pressure. The current screening and basic diagnostics for the disease involve intra-ocular pressure measurement, visual field tests and detection of structural damage to the optic nerve head and retinal nerve fibre layer. The present methods have high rates of false positive or false negative results since the in depth analysis of optical nerve head damage is not possible due to the poor resolution of available optical technologies. A leading candidate is optical coherence tomography (OCT), but the required axial resolution is ~1 m, well beyond the 3-5 m resolution of commercial systems. GALAHAD aims to develop a label free, compact and easy to operate high resolution diagnostic OCT system. The multiband and multimodal system will use submicron ultra-high resolution polarisation sensitive OCT (UHR PS OCT). The key breakthrough elements are: (i) A revolutionary low cost multiband supercontinuum light source. (ii.) Ground-breaking ultra-broadband photonic components required to exploit such a source. (iii.) Automated glaucoma screening algorithms: using end user evaluation of cell and animal models and tissue samples, automated algorithms will be developed, trained and tested so that non-expert operators will be able to perform glaucoma screening. The GALAHAD in depth glaucoma diagnostics after a positive screening with conventional methods will dramatically reduce false positive and false negative screening results and decrease the number of patients suffering from glaucoma-related disability. The project is driven by world leading companies and manufacturers of OCT systems and guided by requirement specifications and validated by high ranking clinical and experimental ophthalmologists in their clinical settings.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: FCH2-RIA | Phase: FCH-02-5-2016 | Award Amount: 3.15M | Year: 2017

The INSIGHT project aims at developing a Monitoring, Diagnostic and Lifetime Tool (MDLT) for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stacks and the hardware necessary for its implementation into a real SOFC system. The effectiveness of the MDLT will be demonstrated through on-field tests on a real micro-Combined Heat and Power system (2.5 kW), thus moving these tools from Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 3 to beyond 5. INSIGHT leverages the experience of previous projects and consolidates their outcomes both at methodological and application levels. The consortium will specifically exploit monitoring approaches based on two advanced complementary techniques: Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) in addition to conventional dynamic stack signals. Durability tests with faults added on purpose and accelerated tests will generate the data required to develop and validate the MDL algorithms. Based on the outcome of experimental analysis and mathematical approaches, fault mitigation logics will be developed to avoid stack failures and slow down their degradation. A specific low-cost hardware, consisting in a single board able to embed the MDLT will be developed and integrated into a commercial SOFC system, the EnGenTM 2500, which will be tested on-field. INSIGHT will then open the perspective to decrease the costs of service and SOFC stack replacement by 50%, which would correspond to a reduction of the Total Cost of Ownership by 10% / kWh. To reach these objectives, INSIGHT is a cross multidisciplinary consortium gathering 11 organisations from 6 member states (France, Italy, Denmark, Slovenia, Austria, Finland) and one associated country (Switzerland). The partnership covers all competences necessary: experimental testing (CEA, DTU, EPFL), algorithms developments (UNISA, IJS, AVL), hardware development (BIT), system integration and validation (VTT, SP, HTC), supported by AK for the project management and dissemination.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-3-01 | Award Amount: 4.09M | Year: 2010

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the major cause of reproductive and respiratory problems in pigs worldwide. Controlling this disease is a top priority in pig producing countries. Due to mutations at a high frequency, new variants of the virus appear that are no longer effectively controlled by the commercial vaccines. In addition, highly virulent variants emerge, leading to high losses. With regard to animal welfare and agricultural economics, there is an urgent need to control PRRS. Furthermore, the abusive use of antibiotics to control PRRSV-associated respiratory problems may lead to resistance that may endanger public health. PoRRSCon is an initiative of 14 partners originating from Europe and Asia with strong expertises in virology and immunology. They are doing frontline research on PRRSV and/or vaccine development. Two of these partners are leading European pharmaceutical companies that will guide the consortium in the direction of exploitable results. By joining their strengths they have an ideal position to be successful in one of the most difficult challenges in pig health, controlling PRRS. To reach this final goal, the following objectives are forwarded:(i) characterize genetically and antigenically current PRRSV isolates in Europe and Asia, (ii) have a better understanding of the complex pathogenesis of PRRSV infections, immune response against PRRSV and immune modulation by PRRSV, (iii) define the genetic base of PRRSV virulence, (iv) identify PRRSV proteins and domains on these viral proteins that are involved in the induction of the immunity against PRRSV and in the immune modulation of PRRSV, (v) develop new generation, efficacious and safe marker vaccines that can be adapted to temporary changes and geographical differences and (vi) develop DIVA assays that allow to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals. At the end, it will be possible to set up a control strategy by combining marker vaccines with DIVA assays


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-2-13 | Award Amount: 5.09M | Year: 2010

The recent decline of European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and no signs of recovery has brought attention to the biologically unsustainable exploitation of the stock. In September 2007, the EU has adopted the Council Regulation 1100/2007 establishing measures for the recovery of the European eel stock. However, eel are still fished intensively for human consumption while aquaculture and restocking rely exclusively on the supply of glass eels caught each year. A controlled production of eel larvae is ever more urgent. The objective of PRO-EEL is to develop standardised protocols for production of high quality gametes, viable eggs and feeding larvae. The approach is to expand knowledge about the intricate hormonal control and physiology of eels which complicates artificial reproduction. This knowledge will be applied in the development of suitable methods to induce maturation considering different rearing conditions. Knowledge about the gametogenesis and maturation pattern will be developed in small scale tests and applied to establish standardised fertilisation procedures. New knowledge about functional anatomy of embryos and yolksac larvae will be applied to develop suitable feed. Protocols for larval production will be tested in full scale experimental facilities managed in collaboration with a qualified SME. The integrated protocols and technology development will be evaluated relative to the output of healthy embryos and yolksac larvae. Larval feeds will be developed towards pioneering first-feeding in European eel larvae, which will be a major breakthrough and promising step towards a self-sustained aquaculture. The strength of the project is its interdisciplinary approach and the unique expertise of the consortium. PRO-EEL brings together leading institutes in eel reproduction complemented by excellence in disciplines filling gaps in knowledge and technology. A tight collaboration with the aquaculture industry promotes the applicability of developed technology.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: Fission-2010-3.3.1 | Award Amount: 2.72M | Year: 2011

This project aims on the one hand to keep the momentum gained through the European Project EURANOS in establishing a platform where the operational and research community can meet and discuss with all the relevant stakeholders the topics related to emergency response and recovery preparedness and on the other hand to tackle urgent research topics in the area of nuclear emergency response and recovery preparedness. It addresses the call Fission-2010-3.3.1: European platform on emergency and post-accident preparedness and management. Through a collaboration of industry, research and governmental organisations in Europe, methodological aspects and computational models will be developed to be consistent with recent recommendations from international bodies such as the ICRP (International Commission of Radiation Protection) and improve Europes response by coupling the decision support systems with an early notification system such as ECURIE. Within this project, a platform will be established that will be a unique place for combined meeting of the research and the operational community.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.3-05 | Award Amount: 11.61M | Year: 2013

EFFORT studies the complex epidemiology and ecology of antimicrobial resistance and the interactions between bacterial communities, commensals and pathogens in animals, the food chain and the environment.This will be conducted by a combination of epidemiological and ecological studies using newly developed molecular and bio-informatics technologies. EFFORT will include an exposure assessment of humans from animal/environmental sources. The ecological studies on isolates will be verified by in vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, real-life intervention studies will be conducted aiming at reducing the use of antimicrobials in veterinary practice. Focus will be on understanding the eco-epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance from animal origin and based on this, predicting and limiting the future evolution and exposure to humans of the most clinically important resistance by synthesising different sources of information in our prediction models. Through its results, the EFFORT research will provide scientific evidence and high quality data that will inform decision makers, the scientific community and other stakeholders about the consequences of AMR in the food chain, in relation to animal health and welfare, food safety and economic aspects. These results can be used to support political decisions and to prioritize risk management options along the food chain. The EFFORT consortium is made up of 20 partners from 10 European countries: Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain and Switzerland. The senior investigators leading this proposal bring together complementary strengths antimicrobial resistance, food safety, epidemiology of food borne pathogens and risk modelling, environmental epidemiology and microbial ecology, exposure assessment, veterinary microbiology, preventive molecular characterization of AMR, genetics and biology of DNA transfer mechanisms, whole genome sequencing for bacteria and economics of animal diseases


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: ENERGY.2012.8.8.1 | Award Amount: 7.45M | Year: 2013

Urban areas are responsible for three quarters of the global energy demand. Most decisions on implementing energy innovations are made in cities. TRANSFORM supports cities to meet the 20-20-20 targets by the integration of energy in urban management. In interactive Smart Urban Labs, stakeholders will be able to turn ambitions into tangible Implementation Plans. TRANSFORMs integrative approach brings operational plans to the strategic level, including strong stakeholder processes, data analytics and takes into account all relevant energy flows, environmental aspects, urban mobility, and the interrelation of possible measures and their costs. This integration of elements creates win-win business models for stakeholders with initially different interests. The TRANSFORM consortium consists of six frontrunner cities from across Europe in the fields of Smart City, Integrated Urban Planning and sustainable project development. Energy companies, both local and European, work with them, together with knowledge institutions and leading European commercial partners. TRANSFORM: - Supports cities with implementation plans embedded in integrated planning - Improves insight in stakeholder processes and financial strategies - Improves insight in the use of data, and the possibility to find better economics by using analytics The power of TRANSFORM is the combination of practice and scientific insights. The delivered Key Performance Indicators and models for integrated planning and data analysis set standards for the European Smart City project. All European cities will benefit from this approach in their change from business-as-usual to low carbon strategies. City-to-city replication and implementation of the results are a crucial element of TRANSFORM. The project mobilizes stakeholders and politicians of European cities through the extensive networks of all TRANSFORM partners, for example by providing master classes and through a strong political Memorandum of Understanding.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: ENERGY.2009.2.9.2 | Award Amount: 1.80M | Year: 2010

The objectives are to create a framework for knowledge sharing and to develop a research roadmap for activities in the context of offshore renewable energy (RE). In particular, the project will stimulate collaboration in research activities leading towards innovative, cost efficient and environmentally benign offshore RE conversion platforms for wind, wave and other ocean energy resources, for their combined use as well as for the complementary use such as aquaculture and monitoring of the sea environment. The use of the offshore resources for RE generation is a relatively new field of interest. ORECCA will overcome the knowledge fragmentation existing in Europe and stimulate the key experts to provide useful inputs to industries, research organizations and policy makers (stakeholders) on the necessary next steps to foster the development of the ocean energy sector in a sustainable and environmentally friendly way. A focus will be given to respect the strategies developed towards an integrated European maritime policy. The project will define the technological state of the art, describe the existing economical and legislative framework and identify barriers, constraints and needs within. ORECCA will enable collaboration of the stakeholders and will define the framework for future exploitation of offshore RE sources by defining 2 approaches: pilot testing of technologies at an initial stage and large scale deployment of offshore RE farms at a mature stage. ORECCA will finally develop a vision including different technical options for deployment of offshore energy conversion platforms for different target areas in the European seas and deliver integrated roadmaps for the stakeholders. These will define the strategic investment opportunities, the R&D priorities and the regulatory and socio-economics aspects that need to be addressed in the short to the medium term to achieve a vision and a strategy for a European policy towards the development of the offshore RE sector


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.2-09 | Award Amount: 11.84M | Year: 2013

The European aquaculture is a modern industry employing 190,000 people, with a 7 billion ex-farm value. This sector is well situated to be among world leaders in the efficient and sustainable production of safe seafood of the highest quality and nutritional value, taking into account consumer preferences and the large diversity of aquatic products from the wild. DIVERSIFY identified a number of new/emerging finfish species, with a great potential for the expansion of the EU aquaculture industry. The emphasis is on Mediterranean or warm-water cage culture, but also addressed are cold-water, pond/extensive and fresh water aquaculture. These new/emerging species are fast growing and/or large finfishes, marketed at a large size and can be processed into a range of products to provide the consumer with both a greater diversity of fish species and new value-added products. DIVERSIFY focuses on meagre (Argyrosomus regius) and greater amberjack (Seriola dumerili) for warm-water marine cage culture, wreckfish (Polyprion americanus) for warm- and cool-water marine cage culture, Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) for marine cold-water culture, grey mullet (Mugil cephalus) a euryhaline herbivore for pond/extensive culture, and pikeperch (Sanders lucioperca) for freshwater intensive culture using RAS. These species were selected based both on their biological and economical potential, and to cover the entire European geographic area and stimulate different aquaculture types. In collaboration with a number of SMEs, DIVERSIFY will build on recent/current national initiatives for species diversification in aquaculture, in order to overcome the documented bottlenecks in the production of these species. The combination of biological, technological and socioeconomic research planned in DIVERSIFY are expected to support the diversification of the aquaculture industry and help in expanding production, increasing aquaculture products and development of new markets.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2011.7.2-1 | Award Amount: 19.44M | Year: 2012

6 Transmission System Operators (Belgium, France, Greece, Norway, Portugal and United Kingdom) and CORESO, a TSO coordination centre, together with 13 RTD performers propose a 4 year R&D project to develop and to validate an open interoperable toolbox which will bring support, by 2015, to future operations of the pan-European electricity transmission network, thus favouring increased coordination/harmonisation of operating procedures among network operators. Under the coordination of RTE, new concepts, methods and tools are developed to define security limits of the pan European system and to quantify the distance between an operating point and its nearest security boundary: this requires building its most likely description and developing a risk based security assessment accounting for its dynamic behaviour. The chain of resulting tools meets 3 overarching functional goals: i) to provide a risk based security assessment accounting for uncertainties around the most likely state, for probabilities of contingencies and for corresponding preventive and corrective actions. ii) to construct more realistic states of any system (taking into account its dynamics) over different time frames (real-time, intraday, day ahead, etc.). iii) to assess system security using time domain simulations (with less approximation than when implementing current standard methods/tools). The prototype tool box is validated according to use cases of increasing complexity: static risk-based security approach at control zone level, dynamic security margins accounting for new power technologies (HVDC, PST, FACTS), use of data coming from off-line security screening rules into on-line security assessment, and finally security maps at pan European level. Dissemination is based on periodic workshops for a permanent user group of network operators invited to use modules to meet their own control zone needs and the ones of present or future coordination centres.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2010.1.3-05 | Award Amount: 1.21M | Year: 2010

This European surveillance network for influenza in pigs (ESNIP) 3 will maintain and expand surveillance networks established during previous EC concerted actions (ESNIP 1, QLK2-CT-2000-01636; ESNIP 2, SSPE-022749). Three work packages (WP 2, 3, 4) aim to increase the knowledge of the epidemiology and evolution of swine influenza (SI) virus (SIV) in European pigs through organised field surveillance programmes (WP2). Virus strains detected in these programmes will be subjected to detailed characterisation both antigenically (WP3) and genetically (WP4) using standardised methodology. Specifically this will involve timely information on genomic data and generation of antigenic maps using the latest technology. These analyses will provide significant and timely added value to knowledge of SIV. A strong focus will be monitoring spread and independent evolution of pandemic H1N1 2009 virus in pigs. All these data will in turn be used to improve the diagnosis of SI by updating the reagents used in the recommended techniques (WP2). The virus bank and electronic database that were established during ESNIPs 1 and 2 will also be expanded and formally curated with relevant SIV isolates and information for global dissemination within and outwith the consortium (WP5). ESNIP 3 represents the only organised surveillance network for influenza in pigs and seeks to strengthen formal interactions with human and avian surveillance networks previously established in ESNIP 2. A timely and transparent interaction with these networks will be a key output. These approaches are entirely consistent with improved pandemic preparedness and planning for human influenza whilst providing an evidence base for decisions in relation to veterinary health. The project consortium consists of 24 participants, which contribute a blend of different specialisms and skills ensuring multi-disciplinary cutting-edge outputs. The vast majority of the partners are actively working with SIV including in a field setting. Twenty-one participants are from 11 EU member states, seven of which were actively involved in ESNIP 2. Co-operation with partners in China and North America will continue to promote a greater understanding of the epidemiology of SIVs at a global level.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.2-01 | Award Amount: 5.09M | Year: 2012

Cost-efficient, environmental-friendly and socially sustainable biomass supply chains are urgently needed to achieve the 2020 targets of the Strategic Energy Technologies-Plan of the European Union, which are likely to be impeded by the potential scarcity of lignocellulosic biomass from agriculture. Innovative techniques for crop management, biomass harvesting and pre-treatment, storage and transport offer a prime avenue to increase biomass supply while keeping costs down and minimizing adverse environmental impacts. The LogistEC project aims at developing new or improved technologies for all steps of the logistics chains, and at assessing their sustainability at supply-area level for small to large-scale bio-based projects. It encompasses all types of lignocellulosic crops: annual and multi-annual crops, perennial grasses, and short-rotation coppice. Through specific meta-analyses, laboratory tests, field trials, ecosystem modelling and mechanical engineering, the project will deliver recommendations for optimal technologies as well as new equipments and systems. A framework will be developed to integrate chain components and assess their sustainability in terms of environmental, economic and social impacts. It will enable a multi-criteria optimization of the supply chains, making the most of the progresses achieved in the new logistics technologies. The optimization system will be developed and tested in a set of bio-energy and bio-materials case-studies across Europe. Improved logistics will be demonstrated at pilot and industrial scales in 2 regions (Eastern France and Southern Spain) for existing bio-energy and bio-materials value chains. All technology developments will be carried out with industrial partners, to speed up their transfer to market. Project results will be disseminated to the relevant stakeholder groups via scientific and technical conferences, targeted events in connection with the demonstration sites, the project web site and newsletters.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-AG | Phase: ERC-AG-PE3 | Award Amount: 2.44M | Year: 2009

Low-temperature studies of transition metal doped III-V and II-VI compounds carried out over the last decade have demonstrated the unprecedented opportunity offered by these systems for exploring physical phenomena and device concepts in previously unavailable combinations of quantum structures and ferromagnetism in semiconductors. The work proposed here aims at combining and at advancing epitaxial methods, spatially-resolved nano-characterisation tools, and theoretical modelling in order to understand the intricate interplay between carrier localisation, magnetism, and magnetic ion distribution in DMS, and to develop functional DMS structures. To accomplish these goals we will take advantage of two recent breakthroughs in materials engineering. First, the attainment of high-k oxides makes now possible to generate interfacial hole densities up to 10^21 cm-3. We will exploit gated thin layers of DMS phosphides, nitrides, and oxides, in which hole delocalization and thus high temperature ferromagnetism is to be expected under gate bias. Furthermore we will systematically investigate how the Curie temperature of (Ga,Mn)As can be risen above 180 K. Second, the progress in nanoscale chemical analysis has allowed demonstrating that high temperature ferromagnetism of semiconductors results from nanoscale crystallographic or chemical phase separations into regions containing a large concentration of the magnetic constituent. We will elaborate experimentally and theoretically epitaxy and co-doping protocols for controlling the self-organised growth of magnetic nanostructures, utilizing broadly synchrotron radiation and nanoscopic characterisation tools. The established methods will allow us to obtain on demand either magnetic nano-dots or magnetic nano-columns embedded in a semiconductor host, for which we predict, and will demonstrate, ground-breaking functionalities. We will also assess reports on the possibility of high-temperature ferromagnetism without magnetic ions.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2009-3.2-1 | Award Amount: 15.99M | Year: 2010

The SYNFLOW vision is the paradigm shift from batch-wise large volume processes in pharmaceuticals, fine chemicals and intermediates production comprising many separate unit operations towards highly integrated but yet flexible catalytic continuous flow processing. For this purpose, SYNFLOW develops a unique integrative approach combining molecular understanding of synthesis and catalysis with engineering science in process design and plant concepts, aiming at an efficiency breakthrough in process development and operation. The SYNFLOW mission is to overcome the traditional way of linear process development providing individual solutions for specific products, and to demonstrate the technological, economic and ecological superiority of truly designing processes by application of advanced chemical and engineering knowledge. The SYNFLOW concept is based on the definition of generic challenges with industrial relevance, represented by Case Studies provided by the industrial consortium members. Catalyst development, studies of the underlying chemical target transformations (synthetic methodology), tailored reaction engineering, conceptual process design and process evaluation interact closely in order to substantiate the SYNFLOW vision. Its success will be demonstrated on a relevant production scale as a reference for the entire European Chemical Industry. The SYNFLOW consortium brings together major industrial producers from the Pharmaceuticals, Fine Chemicals and Intermediates sectors, providers of process technology and technical catalyst supply. A number of high-ranked academic partners ensures the availability of comprehensive expertise for the suggested Case Studies. Dissemination of the results is guaranteed by the participation of DECHEMA and Britest. SYNFLOW presents a holistic approach to central challenges of the European Chemical Industries and therefore a highly promising candidate to fulfill the crucial issues of the NMP-2009-3.2-1 call.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.5-01 | Award Amount: 11.91M | Year: 2013

The AQUAVALENS consortium has brought together SMEs, Industries, Universities and Research Institutes with the mission of protecting the health of European Citizens from contaminated drinking water and water used in food processing. We will achieve this by developing sustainable technologies to enable water system managers whether in large or small water systems or within food growers or manufacturers to better control the safety of their water supplies. The work of the project is divided into four main clusters of work packages that sequentially lead to the development of appropriate technologies. These four clusters are: 1. Platform targets, 2. Platform development, 3. Field studies in European drinking water systems, and 4. Improving Public Health through safer water. In cluster 1 we shall generate new knowledge on the molecular genetics of viral, bacterial and parasitic waterborne pathogens. This will enable us to identify gene targets for the identification, and characterisation of these pathogens, that will also enable the determination of their virulence for humans. In cluster 2 we shall use the knowledge gained to develop new technologies that integrate sample preparation and detection into a single platform. These platforms will then be subject to a rigorous process of validation and standardisation. In cluster 3 we will use the validated platforms to undertake a series of field studies in large and small drinking water systems, and in food production. These field studies will generate new knowledge about the risk to public health from waterborne pathogens in Europe and also test the value of the technologies in the field. Finally in cluster 4 we test how these technologies can be used to protect human health, though improving the effectiveness of Water Safety Plans, adaptation to climate change, and control of outbreaks of infectious disease. We will also determine the sustainability and potential economic impacts of these technologies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2013.1.4-3 | Award Amount: 9.29M | Year: 2013

Nanotechnology is a key enabling technology. Still existing uncertainties concerning EHS need to be addressed to explore the full potential of this new technology. One challenge consists in the development of methods that reliably identify, characterize and quantify nanomaterials (NM) both as substance and in various products and matrices. The European Commission has recently recommended a definition of NM as reference to determine whether an unknown material can be considered as nanomaterial (2011/696/EU). The proposed NanoDefine project will explicitly address this question. A consortium of European top RTD performers, metrology institutes and nanomaterials and instrument manufacturers has been established to mobilize the critical mass of expertise required to support the implementation of the definition. Based on a comprehensive evaluation of existing methodologies and a rigorous intra-lab and inter-lab comparison, validated measurement methods and instruments will be developed that are robust, readily implementable, cost-effective and capable to reliably measure the size of particles in the range of 1100 nm, with different shapes, coatings and for the widest possible range of materials, in various complex media and products. Case studies will assess their applicability for various sectors, including food/feed, cosmetics etc. One major outcome of the project will be the establishment of an integrated tiered approach including validated rapid screening methods (tier 1) and validated in depth methods (tier 2), with a user manual to guide end-users, such as manufacturers, regulatory bodies and contract laboratories, to implement the developed methodology. NanoDefine will be strongly linked to main standardization bodies, such as CEN, ISO and OECD, by actively participating in TCs and WGs, and by proposing specific ISO/CEN work items, to integrate the developed and validated methodology into the current standardization work.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.2-10 | Award Amount: 8.06M | Year: 2012

European aquaculture production provides direct employment to 65.000 people with a turnover of 3 billion . However, the lack of authorised veterinary medicinal products and the consequent disease outbreaks in farmed fish species costs the sector 20% of the production value. The most appropriate method for disease control, both on economical and ethical grounds, is disease prevention by vaccination. TargetFish will advance the development of existing (but not sufficient) and new prototype vaccines against socio-economically important viral or bacterial pathogens of Atlantic salmon, rainbow trout, common carp, sea bass, sea bream and turbot. The project will develop targeted vaccination strategies for currently sub-optimal and for novel vaccines. Improved vaccines will be brought closer to industrial application by addressing practical issues such as efficacy, safety and delivery route. TargetFish will also establish a knowledge- and technology-base for rational development of next generation fish vaccines. To achieve these challenging tasks, we brought together 29 partners from 11 EU member states, 2 associated countries and 1 International Cooperation Partner Country (ICPC). In this large multidisciplinary consortium an approximate equal number of RTD and SME partners will cooperate closely while keeping an intensive communication with the large vaccine and nutrition industries via an Industry Forum. Specifically, TargetFish will 1) generate knowledge by studying antigens and adjuvants for mucosal routes of administration while analyzing the underpinning protective immune mechanisms; 2) validate this knowledge with response assays for monitoring vaccine efficacy and study safety aspects, including those associated with DNA vaccines; 3) approach implementation of prototype vaccines by optimizing vaccination strategies thus 4) shortening the route to exploitation. Thereby, this project will greatly enhance targeted disease prophylaxis in European fish farming.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 4.17M | Year: 2012

The objective of the P4FIFTY project is to deliver a trans-European network of industrially oriented white biotechnologists fully trained in the application of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) for application in the chemical manufacturing and pharmaceutical industries. This will involve academic groups investigating P450 diversity exploration from the wild type enzymes and their genes, genome mining for novel P450s, the expression of these in suitable hosts, the enzymology and molecular biological manipulation of these (including directed evolution and high throughput screening [HTS] methods), the chemical application and finally the chemical and biochemical engineering aspects of application. These inputs are supported by two industrial partners one from the pharmaceutical industries (drug metabolism and synthesis) and one from the large scale chemical manufacturing industry.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.1.1-4 | Award Amount: 21.36M | Year: 2008

A detailed understanding of human biology will require not only knowledge of the human genome but also of the human metagenome, defined here as the ensemble of the genomes of human-associated microorganisms. Our proposal focuses on the microorganisms of the gut, which are particularly abundant and complex and have an important role for human health and well-being. We shall implement and integrate the following activities: (i) creation of a reference set of genes and genomes of intestinal microbes, using high fidelity metagenomic sequencing and full genome sequencing of selected bacterial species; (ii) creation of the generic tools, based on the high density DNA arrays and novel ultra-high throughput re-sequencing techniques, to study the variation of human gut microbiota; (iii) use of the tools to search for correlations between the genes present in the gut microbiota and disease, focusing on the inflammatory bowel disease and obesity, the two pathologies of increasing social relevance in Europe; (iv) study of the genes correlated with the disease, both in terms of their function in microbes and their effect on the host, with the focus on host-microbe interactions; (v) development of an informatics resource to store and organize the heterogeneous information generated within the project, such as gene and genome sequences, gene frequencies in healthy and sick individuals or gene functions and also enriched by information relevant to human gut microbiota from the outside of the project; (vi) creation of the bioinformatics tools to carry out the meta-analysis of the information; (vii) creation of an interface with the stakeholders, including an international board to promote cooperation and coordination in the human metagenome field, and general public. Our project will place Europe in a leading position in this field and open avenues to modulate human gut microbiota in a reasoned way, enabling to optimize the health and wellbeing of any individual.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.2-01 | Award Amount: 2.28M | Year: 2013

The ERA-NET MarineBiotech (ERA-MBT) recognises that Europes marine ecosystems and organisms are largely unexplored, understudied and underutilized, in spite of Europes access to an extensive and diverse set of marine ecosystems, supporting an enormous marine biodiversity. This resource, through the coordinated application of marine biotechnology, has the potential to provide a major contribution towards addressing some of the most pressing societal challenges including environmental degradation, human health and delivering sustainable supplies of food and energy, amongst others regarded as the Grand Challenges for our future. The ERA-MBT is therefore designed to deliver better coordination of relevant national and regional Research, Technology Development and Innovation (RTDI) programmes in Europe, reducing fragmentation and duplication, and paving the way for common programmes and cooperation in the provision and use of research infrastructures. A necessity to make sustainable use of this unique resource. ERA-MBTs 21 partners will work with stakeholders from industry and organisations to identify needs and gaps in the value chain from research and development, through optimaising research results for proof of consept and industrial uptake and valorisation. At least three transnational calls will address these challenges, and cooperations with complementing activities will be explored to add value and power to enable the development of a horisontally applicable technology like marine biotechnology. For updated info: www.marinebiotech.eu


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.3.3-1 | Award Amount: 16.37M | Year: 2011

To address the call for proposals Biology and control of vector-borne infections in Europe launched by the European Commission, we want to investigate the biological, ecological and epidemiological components of vector-borne diseases (VBD) introduction, emergence and spread, and to propose innovative tools for controlling them, building on the basis of acquired knowledge. We have selected the main groups of arthropod vectors involved in the transmission of vector-borne diseases in Europe: ticks, mosquitoes, sandflies, and biting midges (Culicoides). We have also selected the main diseases of actual or possible importance in human and veterinary public health. Rodents, insectivores and rodent-borne diseases have also been considered, both for their direct importance in public health, and for the major role of rodents and insectivores as reservoir hosts of many pathogens. We have put a strong focus on vector- and disease-quantitative modelling. The resulting predictive models will be used to assess climate or environmental change scenarios, as well as vector or disease control strategies. Human behaviour and risk perception are an important component of VBD introduction, emergence and spread. The consequences triggered by VBD for human and veterinary public health in Europe are just starting to emerge in public awareness. We will also account for this aspect of human and veterinary public health in our proposal. Finally, the set of innovative research methods, tools and results obtained during the project will be a step forward a generic approach of VBD in terms of disease monitoring and early warning systems, and will reinforce the general framework for an integrated pest and disease management system. For all these aspects, we will benefit from, and amplify the strong scientific results, capacity building, and research networks established by EDEN project on emerging, vector-borne diseases in a changing European environment.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2009-1.2.3 | Award Amount: 5.03M | Year: 2009

The proposed project will deliver an electronic infrastructure and supporting mechanisms for the identification, deposition, access, and monitoring of FP7 and ERC funded articles, where the main supporting mechanism will be the establishment and operation of the European Helpdesk System. Additionally, the project will offer a special repository for articles that can be stored neither in institutional nor in subject-based/thematic repositories, while it will also prepare the way for similar functionality on scientific data. All deposited articles and data will be freely accessible worldwide through a new portal to the products of EU-funded research, built as part of this project. It will also connect research input (project contracts) with research output (publications and data) and monitor the system use to obtain statistically-significant trends about both. Thematically, the project will focus on peer-reviewed publications (primarily, journal articles in final or pre-print form, but also conference articles, when considered important) in at least the seven disciplines highlighted in the Open Access pilot (energy, environment, health, cognitive systems-interaction-robotics, electronic infrastructures, science in society, and socioeconomic sciences-humanities) and on research datasets in a subset of them. Geographically, however, it will have a definitive European footprint by covering the European Union in its entirety, engaging people and scientific repositories in almost all 27 member states and beyond. The electronic infrastructure built by the project will be based on state-of-the-art software services of the D-NET package developed within the DRIVER and DRIVER-II projects and the Invenio digital repository software developed at CERN. These will be further enhanced and complemented with services developed within OpenAIRE to address critical requirements and issues that arise in the target environment and require further investigation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 15.44M | Year: 2008

The overall objective of UNICELLSYS is a quantitative understanding of fundamental characteristics of eukaryotic unicellular organism biology: how cell growth and proliferation are controlled and coordinated by extracellular and intrinsic stimuli. Achieving an understanding of the principles with which bio-molecular systems function requires integrating quantitative experimentation with simulations of dynamic mathematical models. UNICELLSYS bring together a consortium of leading European experimental and computational systems biologists that will study cell growth and proliferation at the levels of cell population, single cell, cellular network, large-scale dynamic systems and functional module. Building computational reconstructions and dynamic models will involve different precise quantitative measurements as well as complementary approaches of mathematical modelling. A major challenge will be the generation of comprehensive dynamic models of the entire control system of cell growth and proliferation, which will require integration of smaller sub-models and reduction of complexity. Implementation of the models will allow observing responses to altered growth conditions zooming in seamlessly from populations consisting of cells of different replicative age and cell cycle stage via genome-wide molecular networks, large dynamic systems to detailed functional modules. Employing computational simulations combined with experimentation will allow discovering new and emerging principles of bio-molecular organisation and analysing the control mechanisms of cell growth and proliferation. The project will deliver new knowledge on fundamental eukaryotic biology as well as tools for quantitative experimentation and modelling. Detailed plans for dissemination and exploitation will ensure that UNICELLSYS will have major impact on the development of Systems Biology in Europe ensuring a competitive advantage of Europe in dynamic quantitative modelling of bio-molecular processes.


GAP2 is about making a difference to an issue of significance to the whole of society; the wellbeing of the marine environment and the sustainability of fisheries upon which society depends for food. It builds on the relationships, processes and plans arising from GAP1 by enabling Mobilisation and Mutual Learning (MML) actions that promote stakeholder participation in the debate on and development of research knowledge and structures relevant to emerging policy on fisheries and the marine environment. A broad range of stakeholders will participate, including actors from civil society organisations, research institutions, universities, national and regional ministries and media organisations. Their work will involve: participatory research actions that integrate the knowledge of stakeholders and scientists and render it useful for management and policy development, critical evaluation of the participatory processes and incorporation of the lessons learned into systems of research and decision making. Global networks will be developed to enable trans- and international cooperation on comparing and establishing good practice. The actions of the participants and the outcomes from GAP2 will provide a concrete realisation of specific Science in Society objectives for engaging the public in research, enabling effective two-way communication between scientists and other stakeholders, and helping to make policy based on scientific evidence and research knowledge. It will contribute to the aim of the Science in Society programme to enhance democratic debate with a more engaged and informed public, by providing better conditions for collective choices on scientific issues relating to sustainable management, conservation of ecosystem integrity and biodiversity of the marine environment.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.1.4-2 | Award Amount: 7.74M | Year: 2012

Organ transplantation is often the only life saving medical approach for several diseases, in spite of many associated problems (lack of organ donors, rejection, life-long heavy medication). The innovative therapeutic approach of the 21th century is focusing on bioartificial organs as an alternative solution.Tissue engineering and stem cell biology have uncovered groundbreaking opportunities for cellular re-programming, i.e., some cell types can be changed into a pluripotent stem cell (PSC) by over-expressing key transcription factors. These induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) share two key characteristics with embryonic stem cells (eSC): self-renewal and pluripotency (ability to differentiate to form any cell type in the human body). Crucially, they are generated from adult cells circumventing many ethical concerns associated with using human eSC. The discovery of human iPSC (hiPSC) enables the growth of an almost unlimited supply of a patients own cells, potentially conferring the ability to grow and regenerate tissues and organs from self, which is expected to resolve organ rejection-related issues. Similarly, recent developments in material science and nanobiotechnology resulted in engineered materials and devices (manipulated and controlled by physical and chemical means), with unique functional or analytical properties. NanoBio4Trans will merge hiPSC-, polymer hybrid scaffolds and biosensor technologies to develop new tools (beyond state-of-the-art) for use in transplantation and biomedical research. The international, trans-sectoral, and multidisciplinary consortium with complementary and leading expertise in material sciences, cell- and molecular biology, sensor technologies, and bioanalytics, aims at developing, optimising and validating a highly vascularised in vivo-like BAL as an extracorporeal bioartificial liver (EBAL), ready to be perfused with human blood plasma, and to be exploited in modern medical technology.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2011.4.1-4 | Award Amount: 6.65M | Year: 2012

The COMTES project has as goal to develop and demonstrate three novel systems for compact seasonal storage of solar thermal energy. These systems will contribute to the EU 20-20-20 targets by covering a larger share of the domestic energy demand with solar thermal energy. Main objective of COMTES is to develop and demonstrate systems for seasonal storage that are significantly better than water based systems. The three technologies are covered in COMTES by three parallel development lines: solid sorption, liquid sorption and supercooling PCM. Strength of this approach is the collaboration of three development groups in activities that pertain to the analyses, methods and techniques that concern all technologies, without risking the exchange of confidential material. In this way, the development is much more effective than in three separate projects. The project starts with a definition of system boundary conditions and target applications. Next comes the investigation of the best available storage materials. Detailed numerical modelling of the physical processes, backed by experimental validations, will lead to optimum component design. Full-scale prototypes are simulated, constructed and tested in the laboratory in order to optimize process design. One year of fully monitored operation in demonstration buildings is followed by an integrated evaluation of the systems and their potential. When deemed successful, the involved industry partners will pick up the developed storage concepts and bring them further to a commercial level. The COMTES project is a cooperation of key scientific institutions active in the above mentioned heat storage technologies. For the first time, all relevant research disciplines are covered in an international effort. For each development line, a top-leading industry partner contributes its know-how and experience, providing the basis for further industrial development and exploitation of project results.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.3.1-4 | Award Amount: 3.94M | Year: 2009

Until recently, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were confined to hospitals (HA-MRSA). However, community- and farm-associated MRSA (CA-and FA-MRSA) has developed as an important cause of infections. No strategies exist to combat these MRSA. CONCORD is aimed at explaining the ecological success in the community and the farm environment of CA- and FA-MRSA in contrast to HA-MRSA in order to facilitate the rationale and development of effective strategies against CA- and FA-MRSA. Epidemiology of CA-MRSA is complex and incomplete. To obtain both a more complete description of the epidemiology of CA-MRSA and recent isolates small scale surveillance will be performed among patients in the 20 most populous EU countries, pig farms in major pig exporting countries and important veal calve raising countries. Genomics data for CA-MRSA are limited and non-existent for FA-MRSA. Successful adaptation of MRSA to a new environment supposes either the acquisition of novel properties or the differential expression of genes already present. Only 2 CA-MRSA have been fully sequenced and the UMCU has sequenced a FA-MRSA. Whole genome sequencing, comparative genome hybridization and transcriptomics will be used to understand the genetic adaptations of MRSA in the community. The contribution of putative virulence factors to pathogenicity will be studied by knock-outs and complemented strains of these knock-outs. The strains will be tested in in vitro and ex vivo models to establish their physiological role. Mathematical modelling is an important tool to manage infection control. A few models exist that evaluate measures to reduce transmission of HA-MRSA or CA-MRSA in jails. No models are available for FA-MRSA. Modelling will provide both fundamental insights on MRSA epidemiology as well as specific recommendations or testable hypotheses for human and veterinary clinical practice. The potential of intervention strategies to combat CA- and FA-MRSA will be determined.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-2.2.6. | Award Amount: 4.73M | Year: 2012

ANAEE will provide Europe with a distributed and coordinated set of experimental, analytical and modelling platforms to analyse and predict in a precise manner the response of the main continental ecosystems to environmental and land use changes. ANAEE will consist of highly equipped in natura and in vitro experimental platforms associated with sophisticated analytical and modelling platforms coupled to networks of instrumented observation and monitoring sites throughout Europe. ANAEE will bring together, for the first time, the major experimental, analytical and modelling facilities in ecosystem science, agriculture and forestry in Europe. In uniting under the same umbrella and with a common vision these highly instrumented ecosystem research facilities, ANAEE will be a key instrument in both structuring and improving the European Research Area in this field. ANAEE will be the reference point for rigorously assessing ecosystem services and their responses to management by agriculture, forestry and to global change. In the context of the development of European bio-economy, critical political, environmental and scientific questions related to ecosystems functioning and services will be answered. ANAEE will therefore be a key instrument for the implementation of forthcoming national and joint programming initiatives notably the JPI Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change (FACCE-JPI).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.7.2.1 | Award Amount: 10.86M | Year: 2013

Power system reliability management means to take decisions under increasing uncertainty (for instance, related to renewable generation). It aims to maintain power system performance at a desired level, while minimizing the socio-economic costs of keeping the power system at that performance level. Seven TSOs (Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Iceland, Norway), together with eleven RTD performers, propose the four year GARPUR research project. GARPUR designs, develops, assesses and evaluates new system reliability criteria and management while maximizing social welfare as they are progressively implemented over the next decades at a pan-European level. The new management methodologies encompass multiple business activities (system development, asset management, power system operation) that, in turn, ensure coherent decision-making at the respective time horizons. These methodologies also involve mathematical and computational models to predict the location, duration and amount of power supply interruptions. Five alternatives to improve reliability management of the pan-European power system are studied. After practical validation by the TSOs, these alternatives are analysed with the help of a quantification platform. Pilot tests of the new proposed reliability criteria are performed by individual TSOs or (when appropriate) a group of TSOs using this quantification platform, either in a given control zone or (where appropriate) throughout the pan-European system. Reliability criteria are compared and presented to the TSO community and regulatory authorities who establish the robustness of the results. Dissemination activities of the new reliability criteria are supported by a Reference Group of TSOs and address all the key electricity market stakeholders. An implementation roadmap is delivered for the deployment of the resulting technical and regulatory solutions to keep the pan-European system reliability at optimal socio-economic levels.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.2-02 | Award Amount: 2.25M | Year: 2012

Europe is facing major challenges in promoting health and reducing the disease burden of age- and diet-related NCDs by means of lifestyle, food and nutrition. Research collaboration, innovation, and capacity building are essential to efficiently benefit from the mainly public research resources. To realise this, EU-wide Research Infrastructures (RIs) are essential. The aim of EURO-DISH is to provide advanced and feasible recommendations on the needs for RIs to ESFRI and other stakeholders. EURO-DISH will focus on needs for integration of existing and the development of new food and health RIs that are relevant for innovations in mechanistic research and public health nutrition strategies across Europe. Building upon available projects and mappings, we will systematically map existing RIs and needs for integration of existing and new RIs, and supporting governance structures throughout Europe. Food and health research comprises multiple disciplines and a broad research area. To assure a balanced attention for the area as a whole, the mapping will be organised around the DISH model: Determinants, Intake, Status, and Health, which represents four key building blocks of the research area as well as different stages of RI development. To go beyond existing mappings, we will synthesize the results by integrating the needs for hard & soft RIs as well as governance; moreover as this may identify newly emerging gaps and needs, it will define larger entities of required RIs. We will develop a conceptual design and roadmap for implementing the most important RIs. It will include links with basic and human science infrastructures, as well as integration and collaboration with industry, third countries and feasibility. Two case studies on RIs, identified as highly relevant by the JPI HDHL for 2012-2015, will enrich the project by designing and testing of pilot RIs that feed the overall conceptual design and roadmap, which will be aligned with on-going activities.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.1.4 | Award Amount: 14.52M | Year: 2012

The FutureID project builds a comprehensive, flexible, privacy-aware and ubiquitously usable identity management infrastructure for Europe, which integrates existing eID technology and trust infrastructures, emerging federated identity management services and modern credential technologies to provide a user-centric system for the trustworthy and accountable management of identity claims.\nThe FutureID infrastructure will provide great benefits to all stakeholders involved in the eID value chain. Users will benefit from the availability of a ubiquitously usable open source eID client that is capable of running on arbitrary desktop PCs, tablets and modern smart phones.\nFutureID will allow application and service providers to easily integrate their existing services with the FutureID infrastructure, providing them with the benefits from the strong security offered by eIDs without requiring them to make substantial investments. This will enable service providers to offer this technology to users as an alternative to username/password based systems, providing them with a choice for a more trustworthy, usable and innovative technology. For existing and emerging trust service providers and card issuers FutureID will provide an integrative framework, which eases using their authentication and signature related products across Europe and beyond. To demonstrate the applicability of the developed technologies and the feasibility of the overall approach FutureID will develop two pilot applications and is open for additional application services who want to use the innovative FutureID technology.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2007-4.0-5 | Award Amount: 11.90M | Year: 2008

Clear-up presents a holistic approach to the reducing operational energy use in buildings. By development and novel use of nano-materials it aims to increase energy performance in heating, ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting systems, and to improve indoor air quality using catalytic purification. Clear-ups solutions are designed for retro-fitting existing buildings and of course for new constructions. It will achieve this by addressing four key components which control the indoor environment: Windows. Clear-up will advance the practical use of shutters and electrochromic window foils which reduce the building cooling load and along with light-guide technology, reduce the need for artificial lighting. Walls. Clear-up will use photocatalytic materials for air purification and nano-porous vacuum insulation in combination with phase change materials to passively control temperature. Air Conditioning. Clear-up will advance technologies for demand controlled ventilation and improved air quality. Sensors and control provide an underpinning technology for Clear-ups approach. New sensors will be developed, and their use optimised for the operation of smart windows; demand controlled ventilation; and catalytic purification. Clear-up will develop, install, measure and evaluate technological solutions in the laboratory, in a large-scale testing facility and in real world applications. Its approach will be demonstrated at the UN Climate Summit in Copenhagen, 2009. The safety of new materials will be considered; it will propose inputs to standards and environmental product declarations for its technologies. Clear-up will also investigate environmental and economic lifecycles for components and systems. The practical issues of exploitation will be addressed in cooperation with industry bodies ECTP, ECCREDI and ENBRI providing access to large firms and SMEs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 2.86M | Year: 2015

AWESOME network aims to educate eleven young researchers in the wind power operation and maintenance (O&M) field by constructing a sustainable training network gathering the whole innovation value chain. The main EU actors in the field of wind O&M have worked together, under the umbrella of the European Wind Energy Academy (EAWE), in order to design a training program coping with the principal R&D challenges related to wind O&M while tackling the shortage of highly-skilled professionals on this area that has been foreseen by the European Commission, the wind energy industrial sector and the academia. The overall AWESOME research programme tackles the main research challenges in the wind O&M field identified by the European wind academic and industrial community: (1) to develop better O&M planning methodologies of wind farms for maximizing its revenue, (2) to optimise the maintenance of wind turbines by prognosis of component failures and (3) to develop new and better cost-effective strategies for Wind Energy O&M. These main goals have been divided into eleven specific objectives, which will be assigned to the fellows, for them to focus their R&D project, PhD Thesis and professional career. The established training plan answers the challenges identified by the SET Plan Education Roadmap. Personal Development Career Plans will be tuned up for every fellow, being their accomplishment controlled by a Personal Supervisory Team. The training plan includes intra-network activities, as well as network-wide initiatives. The secondments at partner organizations and between beneficiaries are a key attribute of the training programme. Each fellow will be exposed to three different research environments from both, academic and industrial spheres. All the network activities will be developed in accordance with the established in the Ethical Codes and Standards for research careers development, looking therefore for talent, excellence and opportunity equality.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: MG-4.1-2014 | Award Amount: 25.11M | Year: 2015

The project HERCULES-2 is targeting at a fuel-flexible large marine engine, optimally adaptive to its operating environment. The objectives of the HERCULES-2 project are associated to 4 areas of engine integrated R&D: Improving fuel flexibility for seamless switching between different fuel types, including non-conventional fuels. Formulating new materials to support high temperature component applications. Developing adaptive control methodologies to retain performance over the powerplant lifetime. Achieving near-zero emissions, via combined integrated aftertreatment of exhaust gases. The HERCULES-2 is the next phase of the R&D programme HERCULES on large engine technologies, which was initiated in 2004 as a joint vision by the two major European engine manufacturer groups MAN and WARTSILA. Three consecutive projects namely HERCULES - A, -B, -C spanned the years 2004-2014. These three projects produced exceptional results and received worldwide acclaim. The targets of HERCULES-2 build upon and surpass the targets of the previous HERCULES projects, going beyond the limits set by the regulatory authorities. By combining cutting-edge technologies, the Project overall aims at significant fuel consumption and emission reduction targets using integrated solutions, which can quickly mature into commercially available products. Focusing on the applications, the project includes several full-scale prototypes and shipboard demonstrators. The project HERCULES-2 comprises 4 R&D Work Package Groups (WPG): - WPG I: Fuel flexible engine - WPG II: New Materials (Applications in engines) - WPG III: Adaptive Powerplant for Lifetime Performance - WPG IV: Near-Zero Emissions Engine The consortium comprises 32 partners of which 30% are Industrial and 70% are Universities / Research Institutes. The Budget share is 63% Industry and 37% Universities. The HERCULES-2 proposal covers with authority and in full the Work Programme scope B1 of MG.4.1-2014.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: OCEAN.2011-1 | Award Amount: 7.38M | Year: 2012

European oceans will be subject to massive development of marine infrastructure in the near future. The most obvious is the energy facilities e.g. offshore wind farms, exploitation of wave energy, expansion of electricity connections, and also further development and implementation of marine aquaculture. This will also lead to an increased need for marine infrastructure to support installation and the on-going operation of the facilities. However both economical costs and environmental impact have to be reduced in order to increase the feasibility of the use of ocean space. Marine structures for offshore wind farms and aquaculture have to be installed at various sites and on much larger scale than earlier implementation of offshore structures in order to fulfil EU strategies (1) for reduction of fossil-based energy and (2) to become a major player in sustainable aquaculture. However the feasibility is much more sensitive to the costs of structures and the installation of the structures than for instance Oil & Gas facilities. Novel innovative design concepts should address different physical conditions in order to make the best use of the ocean space. Going from deep water (north of Spain) to shallow water with high morphological activity (the Wadden sea) and further to inner waters like the inner Danish/Baltic areas and the Adriatic sea changes the focus from a strong physical aspect to environmental impact. This will make it possible to develop, test and integrate different technologies but also to address site specific challenges. Both for offshore renewables and for aquaculture a substantial part of the costs is variable cost related to operations and maintenance of the plants. It is obvious that optimization of the use of ocean space for different purposes might benefit from shared resources such staff allocation, transportation of staff and material from and to the platforms, use of forecasting systems, ships etc.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: CIRC-05-2016 | Award Amount: 3.38M | Year: 2017

RES URBIS aims at making it possible to convert several types of urban bio-waste into valuable bio-based products, in an integrated single biowaste biorefinery and by using one main technology chain. This goal will be pursued through: - collection and analysis of data on urban bio-waste production and present management systems in four territorial clusters that have been selected in different countries and have different characteristics. - well-targeted experimental activity to solve a number of open technical issues (both process- and product-related), by using the appropriate combination of innovative and catalogue-proven technologies. - market analysis whitin several economic scenarios and business models for full exploitation of bio-based products (including a path forward to fill regulatory gaps). Urban bio-waste include the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (from households, restaurants, caterers and retail premises), excess sludge from urban wastewater treatment, garden and parks waste, selected waste from food-processing (if better recycling options in the food chain are not available), other selected waste streams, i.e. baby nappies. Bio-based products include polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and related PHA-based bioplastics as well as ancillary productions: biosolvents (to be used in PHA extraction) and fibers (to be used for PHA biocomposites). Territorial and economic analyses will be done either considering the ex-novo implementation of the biowaste biorefinery or its integration into existing wastewater treatment or anaerobic digestion plants, with reference to clusters and for different production size. The economic analysis will be based on a portfolio of PHA-based bioplastics, which will be produced at pilot scale and tested for applications: - Biodegradable commodity film - Packaging interlayer film - Speciality durables (such as electronics) - Premium slow C-release material for ground water remediation


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-07-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 4.60M | Year: 2016

Medium- to large-scale bioenergy utilisation for electricity and combined industrial or district heating is predicted to increase by 160% in 2020 compared to 2010, while carbon emission quotas are becoming stricter. Finding new ways to efficiently utilise cheap and currently unused feedstocks are necessary in order to meet these challenges. Within the project Biofficiency we will investigate how to handle ash-related problems in order to increase steam temperatures up to 600C in biomass-based CHP plants, including pulverised fuel and fluidised bed systems. The major aspects are fly ash formation, the use of additives, and pre-treatment technologies for difficult fuels. This leads to highly reduced emissions, in particular CO2 and fine particulates, as well as a secure and sustainable energy production. Biofficiency gathers a unique consortium of excellent academic facilities and industrial partners, providing an exceptional platform for the development of new, highly-efficient CHP plants in order to significantly expand their potential in the fast-growing field of renewable energies. By sharing our collective experience, we will strengthen European bio-energy technologies and help solving global climate and energy challenges. The project approach addresses current bottlenecks in solid biomass combustion, namely enhanced deposit formation, corrosion and ash utilisation by a variety of new, promising technologies. Our goal is to deepen the understanding of fly ash formation, to improve current biomass pre-treatment technologies, as well as to contribute to the field of biomass ash utilisation. Through our strong collaboration with industry and academic partners, we want to pave the way for highly-efficient, low-emitting biomass CHP plants, capable of firing low-grade fuels. This benefits industry, communal partners and public authorities by providing sustainable heat and electricity at significantly decreased emissions.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 4.20M | Year: 2013

RENESENG aims to prepare a new generation of highly-qualified researchers in Biorefinery and biobased chemicals Systems Engineering Sciences in Europe, expected to bear high impact in the design of newly establishing industrial complexes in biorefinering and more generally in eco-industries. The effort requires to bring together academic and industrial teams, with particularly interdisciplinary and high-quality expertise, embracing disciplines in agricultural sciences, chemistry and chemical eng., biology and biotechnology, computer science, process engineering, logistics and business economics, as well as social sciences with an emphasis on life cycle analysis skills. The principal scientific challenge of the network is to develop a program of inter-disciplinary research from expert groups with dedicated interests in biorenewables using a model-assisted systems approach as an integrating aspect, further capitalizing on its potential and role to address complex and large problems. The proposal brings state-of-the-art systems technologies mobilizing a critical mass in Europe that is already particularly active in this area but needs to coordinate the efforts and reduce fragmentation of knowledge. The aim is to develop and validate modelling, synthesis, integration and optimization technology addressing: 1)lignin-based and cellulosic processes2)water based paths to biomass production 3) waste treatment paths 4) combination of biorenewables processing with utilization of other renewable. In parallel RENESENG has developed a program of training activities including, development of communication, business, and social skills, visits and social events allowing to prepare a new profile of researchers able to transmit their knowledge in the next networking teams. RENESENG guaranties high quality careers perspective for all, through the active participation of 6 industrials, the creation of spin-offs and the sustainable implementation of a multicenter PhD training program.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.1.1 | Award Amount: 10.05M | Year: 2014

The role of Data Centres (DCs) is vital for the Future Internet. However, DC infrastructures are already stressed by data volumes and service provisioning and consumption trends. Emerging demands cannot be addressed by todays DCs and call for a massive redesign or even transformation of DC architectures.COSIGN proposes a new DC architecture empowered by advanced optical technologies and will demonstrate novel solutions capable of sustaining the growing resource and operational demands of next generation DC Networks. COSIGN aims to move away from todays vendor specific, manually controlled, performance and scale limited DCs towards scalable DC solutions able to support future-proof dynamic, on-demand, low-latency, energy efficient and ultra-high bandwidth DC solutions. COSIGN introduces disruptive transformations in the data plane, significant advances to the control plane and major innovations in the DC virtualization and service orchestration: In the DC Data Plane, COSIGN will deliver an entirely-optical solution enabling scalable top-of-rack switches, ultra-low latency and high volume DC interconnects with high spatial dimensioning. In the DC Control Plane, COSIGN will build upon and extend the Software Defined Networks (SDN) paradigm leveraging capabilities from high-performance optical technologies while developing technology agnostic protocols for software/user defined routing and control. For the DC Management and Orchestration, COSIGN will implement a coherent framework for optical network and IT infrastructure abstraction, virtualization and end-to-end service orchestration.COSIGN brings together a unique combination of skills and expertise able to deliver, for the first time, a coordinated hardware and software architecture, which will guarantee the scale and performance required for future DCs. Results will be demonstrated in challenging industrial setting, leveraging a DC validation platform from Interoute a leading European service provider


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BG-02-2015 | Award Amount: 5.59M | Year: 2016

CERES advances a cause-and-effect understanding of how future climate change will influence Europes most important fish and shellfish populations, their habitats, and the economic activities dependent on these species. CERES will involve and closely cooperate with industry and policy stakeholders to define policy, environment, social, technological, law and environmental climate change scenarios to be tested. This four-year project will: 1. Provide regionally relevant short-, medium- and long-term future, high resolution projections of key environmental variables for European marine and freshwater ecosystems; 2. Integrate the resulting knowledge on changes in productivity, biology and ecology of wild and cultured animals (including key indirect / food web interactions), and scale up to consequences for shellfish and fish populations, assemblages as well as their ecosystems and economic sectors; 3. Utilize innovative risk-assessment methodologies that encompass drivers of change, threats to fishery and aquaculture resources, expert knowledge, barriers to adaptation and likely consequences if mitigation measures are not put in place; 4. Anticipate responses and assist in the adaptation of aquatic food production industries to underlying biophysical changes, including developing new operating procedures, early warning methods, infrastructures, location choice, and markets; 5. Create short-, medium- and long-term projections tools for the industry fisheries as well as policy makers to more effectively promote blue growth of aquaculture and fisheries in different regions; 6. Consider market-level responses to changes (both positive and negative) in commodity availability as a result of climate change; 7. Formulate viable autonomous adaptation strategies within the industries and for policy to circumvent/prevent perceived risks or to access future opportunities; 8. Effectively communicate these findings and tools to potential end-users and relevant stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-29-2016 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2017

More than 450.000 people are diagnosed with esophageal cancer (EC) each-year worldwide and approximately 400.000 die from the disease. Esophageal cancer is the eighth most commonly diagnosed cancer, but it is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death, with incidence rates steeply rising. Risk factors, including gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barretts esophagus, may diagnostically implicate more than 300 million people worldwide. Nevertheless, the disease is detected late due to limitations in current diagnostic procedures leading to adverse prognosis and high treatment costs. ESOTRAC will change the landscape of esophageal diagnosis, over existing methods, based on cross-sectional optoacoustic and optical coherence endoscopy. The dual-modality system delivers a set of early-cancer imaging features necessary for improving early diagnosis, saving lives and leading to 3-5 Billion annual savings for the healthcare system. OCT provides micron scale subsurface morphological information based on photon scattering and optoacoustics provides deeper penetration and complementary pathophysiological features based on photon absorption. ESOTRAC develops novel photonic components (light sources, optical/optoacoustic scopes) and innovates novel medical system designs. Then, it performs pilot studies to investigate the functionality of the new endoscope and deliver a novel imaging-feature portfolio offering improved and earlier diagnosis. A central ESOTRAC ambition is that the new endoscope will become the new EC diagnostic standard by enabling quantitative and label-free three-dimensional endoscopy of early cancer with tremendous potential to impact esophageal care. ESOTRAC leverages European investment and know-how and strengthens the prospects of economic growth by leading the market position in endoscopic imaging.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: IoT-01-2016 | Award Amount: 17.60M | Year: 2017

The SoundCity Project MONICA aims to provide a very large scale demonstration of multiple existing and new Internet of Things technologies for Smarter Living. The solution will be deployed in 6 major cities in Europe. MONICA demonstrates a large scale IoT ecosystem that uses innovative wearable and portable IoT sensors and actuators with closed-loop back-end services integrated into an interoperable, cloud-based platform capable of offering a multitude of simultaneous, targeted applications. All ecosystems will be demonstrated in the scope of large scale city events, but have general applicability for dynamically deploying Smart City applications in many fixed locations such as airports, main traffic arterials, and construction sites. Moreover, it is inherent in the MONICA approach to identify the official standardisation potential areas in all stages of the project. MONICA will demonstrate an IoT platform in massive scale operating conditions; capable of handling at least 10.000 simultaneous real end-users with wearable and portable sensors using existing and emerging technologies (TRL 5-6) and based upon open standards and architectures. It will design, develop and deploy a platform capable of integrating large amounts of heterogeneous, interoperable IoT enabled sensors with different data capabilities (video, audio, data), resource constraints (wearables, Smartphones, Smartwatches), bandwidth (UWB, M2M), costs (professional, consumer), and deployment (wearable, mobile, fixed, airborne) as well as actuators (lights, LED, cameras, alarms, drones, loudspeakers). It will demo end-to-end, closed loop solutions covering everything from devices and middleware with semantic annotations through a multitude of wireless communication channels to cloud based applications and back to actuation networks. Humans-in-the-Loop is demonstrated through integrating Situational Awareness and Decision Support tools for organisers, security staff and sound engineers situation rooms.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.2-02 | Award Amount: 11.97M | Year: 2012

Marine microorganisms form an almost untapped resource of biotechnological potential. However, its use is hindered by the low success rate of isolation of novel microorganisms and often by poor growth efficiency. Hence, the vast majority of marine microorganisms has not been cultivated and is often considered as unculturable. MaCuMBA aims at improving the isolation rate and growth efficiency of marine microorganisms from conventional and extreme habitats, by applying innovative methods, and the use of automated high throughput procedures. The approaches include the co-cultivation of interdependent microorganisms, as well as gradient cultures and other methods mimicking the natural environment, and the exploitation of cell-to-cell communication. Signaling molecules produced by microorganisms may be necessary for stimulating growth of the same or other species, or may prevent their growth. Signaling molecules also represent an interesting and marketable product. MaCuMBA will make use of high throughput platforms such Cocagne, using gel micro-droplet technology, or MicroDish in which many thousands of cultures are grown simultaneously. Various single-cell isolation methods, such as optical tweezers, will aid the isolation of specific target cells. Isolated microorganisms as well as their genomes will be screened for a wide range of bioactive products and other properties of biotechnological interest, such as genetic transformability. Growth efficiency and expression of silent genes of selected strains will be increased also by using the clues obtained from genomic information. MaCuMBA is targeted to SMEs and industry and they make a significant part of the consortium, ensuring that the project focuses on the interests of these partners. Moreover, MaCuMBA has adopted a comprehensive and professional exploitation, dissemination, implementation, and education strategy, ensuring that MaCuMBAs results and products will be directed to end-users and stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: INCO.2012-1.1 | Award Amount: 4.50M | Year: 2013

In 2007, heads of state and government from Africa and Europe launched the Joint Africa-EU Strategy (JAES) formulated in response to geopolitical changes, globalisation and the processes of integration in Africa and Europe. At the heart of the JAES is an overtly political relationship and among the features distinguishing JAES from previous Africa-Europe policy initiatives is the associated action plan addressing eight priority areas for Africa-Europe cooperation. The contribution of scientific and technological research, development and innovation, and the centrality of capacity research for economic and social growth and poverty alleviation, and for addressing global societal challenges of mutual interest is explicit. The value of cooperation between the continents is central and under JAES has already led to significant achievements for mutual benefit. CAAST-Net Plus objectives encourage more and better bi-regional STI cooperation for enhanced outcomes around topics of mutual interest, and particularly in relation to the global societal challenges of climate change, food security and health. CAAST-Net Plus actions rely on bi-regional dialogue among stakeholders for gathering informed opinion and experience about the bi-regional cooperation process, formulating and disseminating it in such a way as to be admissible to the formal bi-regional STI policy dialogue process and to programme owners. Through informing the bi-regional policy dialogue for mutual learning and awareness, through building support for coordinated and innovative approaches to bilateral funding of bi-regional cooperation around global challenges, brokering the public-private relationship to foster improved uptake and translation of bi-regional research partnership outputs into innovative technologies, good and services, and through dedicated mechanisms to encourage bi-regional research partnerships, CAAST-Net Plus will make invaluable contributions to the quality and scope of the Africa-Europe STI relationship for mutual benefit.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.4-01 | Award Amount: 5.09M | Year: 2013

Seafood has been recognized as a high quality, healthy and safe food item. Yet, some seafood can accumulate environmental contaminants with potential impact on human health. Limited information is available for those without maximum limits set by authorities for seafood, like priority contaminants, biotoxins from harmful algal blooms and marine litter. In order to increase seafood safety to consumers and reduce human health risks, ECsafeSEAFOOD aims to assess safety issues mainly related to non-regulated priority contaminants and evaluate their impact on public health. ECsafeSEAFOOD addresses these objectives with eight work packages (WPs) targeting priority environmental contaminants, including biotoxins from harmful algal blooms and marine litter. WP1 will elaborate a database with relevant information required for risk assessment gathered from literature and national monitoring programmes. WP2 will monitor contaminants in seafood using an ambitious sampling strategy following the recommendations of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (Descriptor 9) and assess the effect of seafood processing/cooking on contaminants. In WP3, risk assessment (with data from WP1-2) and mitigation strategies will be implemented to reduce the impact of risky contaminants on human health. WP4 will develop fast screening/detection methods for relevant contaminants tailored to suit stakeholders needs to promote consumers confidence in seafood. WP5 will carry out the toxicological characterization of contaminated seafood in realistic conditions and will use alternative toxicological methods to provide tools for the risk assessment (WP3). WP6 will assess the links between the level of contaminants in the environment and that in seafood through controlled trials and case-study species, taking into account the effect of climate changes. WP7 details a strategy for education, training with clear and practical dissemination of results. WP8 will ensure efficient project management.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SST.2013.4-1. | Award Amount: 6.59M | Year: 2013

The 2012 guidelines on the attained Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) for new ships (MEPC.212(63)) represent a major step forward in implementing the REGULATIONS ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF SHIPS (resolution MEPC.203(62)). There are, however, serious concerns regarding the sufficiency of propulsion power and of steering devices to maintain the manoeuvrability of ships in adverse conditions, hence the safety of ships. This gave reason for additional considerations and studies at IMO (MEPC 64/4/13). Furthermore, whereas present EEDI regulations concern the limitation of toxic gas emissions by ship operation, what is a new constraint in ship design and operation, it necessary to look holistically into this and find the right balance between efficiency, economy, safety and greenness. The aim of the proposed research project is to address the above by: further development and refinement of high fidelity, hydrodynamic simulation software tools for the efficient analysis of the manoeuvring performance and safety of ships in complex environmental conditions; Performing seakeeping/manoeuvring model tests in combined seaway/wind environment for different ship types, to provide the required basis for the validation of results obtained by numerical simulations, whereas full scale measurements available to the consortium will be exploited; Integrating validated software tools into a ship design software platform and set-up of a multi-objective optimization procedure; Investigating the impact of the proposed new guidelines on the design and operational characteristics of various ship types; investigating in parallel the impact on EEDI by the developed integrated/holistic optimisation procedure in a series of case studies; development of new guidelines for the required minimum propulsion power and steering performance to maintain manoeuvrability in adverse conditions; preparing and submitting to IMO a summary of results and recommendations for further consideration.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2009-4.0-3 | Award Amount: 11.70M | Year: 2010

Medical diagnosis is currently undergoing a major revolution due to the fast discovery of molecular biomarkers, and the development of multimodal metabiomarker signatures. Progress, however, is hindered by low abundance of many biomarkers of interest in body fluids, in absolute concentration and with regard to other biomolecules. The aim of the present project is to apply these progresses in biotechnology, nanoparticle synthesis, and nano-instrumentation to the development of fully integrated lab-on chip instruments able to perform elaborate multimodal biomarker analysis on a routine basis and at the ultrasensitive level required to allow minimally invasive tests. In particular, we aim at overcoming a major bottleneck on the path to this objective, which was identified in a previous project in the HEALTH priority: no satisfactory solution currently exists to bridge the several orders of magnitude between the nanoscale volumes at which ultrasensitive new generation sensors operate, and the often millilitre volumes of samples in which the molecules of interest must be found. For this, we shall combine innovations in pre-concentration, micro and nanofluidics, self-assembly, micro-nanofabrication, and nanodetection. The project will develop a generic, multipurpose, platform of compatible enabling technologies, and integrate them into devices. In order to maximize impact and societal benefit, the project will be validated on an application of major interest for health, namely the early detection of biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases (including Alzheimer), with special emphasis on subtyping of these diseases for improved treatment strategies. The consortium includes a multidisciplinary group of technology developers, three leading biomedical groups in clinical neuroscience for definition of specifications and end-user pre-clinical validation, and three research-oriented SMEs in biotechnology, nanosensing and microfluidics.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: FoF.NMP.2013-11 | Award Amount: 5.41M | Year: 2013

Volume production at industrial scale of miniaturised multi-material 3D (polymer-polymer, metal-polymer, metal-metal, polymer-ceramics,...) still face important challenges to be affordable by SMEs. Challenges not only in terms of precision manufacturing (precision engineering <0.01%) but also in the adequate interaction between the different constituent materials. Besides multi-material micro-system manufacturing processes still show to be time and cost consuming mainly from assembling activities and back en processes (35-60% of the total manufacturing costs come only from the assembling), so further research efforts in alternative and more integrated manufacturing concepts(over-moulding of micro-components and in-mould assembly technology would avoid the assembly step) are needed. To answer those problems the development of high-throughput and cost-efficient process chains based on micro injection should consider the following aspects: Improved volume production, not only from the standpoint of the necessary accuracy and performance of the process, but also regarding the interaction/bonding of the different materials which make up the produced parts and the possibility of selective functionality of their surfaces. The integration of the different processes including the feeding and handling systems for automatic operation in order to eliminate human intervention and manufacturing costs. Analyse the most suitable process control, online verification and back-end processes taking into account the features of the multi-material replicated parts represented by five demonstrators. The aim is to reduce manufacturing costs up to 40%. Thus, the HINMICO project final outcome will enable to produce high quality multi-material micro-components through more integrated, efficient and cheaper process chains.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: Fission-2012-3.3.1 | Award Amount: 6.50M | Year: 2013

This proposal aims to close gaps that have been identified in nuclear and radiological preparedness following the first evaluation of the Fukushima disaster. It addresses the call Fission-2010-3.3.1: Update of emergency management and rehabilitation strategies and expertise in Europe. The consortium intends to review existing operational procedures in dealing with long lasting releases, address the cross border problematic in monitoring and safety of goods and will further develop still missing functionalities in decision support system ranging from improved source term estimation and dispersion modelling to the inclusion of hydrological pathways for European water bodies. As the management of the Fukushima event in Europe was far from being optimal, we propose to develop means on a scientific and operational basis to improve information collection, information exchange and the evaluation for such types of accidents. This will be achieved through a collaboration of industry, research and governmental organisations in Europe taking into account the networking activities carried out under the NERIS-TP project. Furthermore, the NERIS Platform member organisations (so far 43 partners) will be actively involved in the development.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: ENV.2008.3.3.1.1. | Award Amount: 1.20M | Year: 2009

Many potentially hazardous compounds are traded as chemicals or incorporated as additives in products. Their release to the environment has been a concern of EC, UNO, WHO and OECD. The discussion of the assessment and management of chemicals and products led to the OECD program Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). The World Summit encouraged countries to implement GHS with a view of having the system operating by 2008. The need to form GHS on a global scale is part of EU policy. GHS aims to have the same criteria worldwide to classify the responsible trade and handling of chemicals and at the same time protect human health. The EU will ensure transition from the current EU Classification & Labelling (C\L) to the GHS which harmonizes with REACH. Countries like Japan and the USA announced to implement GHS in the near future. UNITAR supports other countries. However, a complete picture on the global state of implementation is not available. With the growing level of worldwide trade we however face unsafe products on the marked. Only last year reports about toys releasing hazardous components made it to headlines. Vietnam reported that all kind of plastic gets recycled and sold back to the market. This shows that global trade in a circular economy is not acceptable without globally agreed assessment methods and harmonised C\L. A ECB study revealed that the EU regulation REACH will require 3.9 mill. additional test animals if no alternative methods are accepted. The number of additional tests are unknown when GHS is implemented in a global scale. The CA RISKCYCLE will include experts from OECD, UNEP, SusChem, country experts from Asia, America and Europe. The overall objective of the project is to define with international experts future needs of R\D contributions for innovations in the field of risk-based management of chemicals and products in a global perspective using alternative testing strategies to minimize animal tests.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2010.10.2-1 | Award Amount: 4.18M | Year: 2010

The hypothesis of this project is that a new wind turbine concept developed specifically for offshore application has potentials for better cost efficiency than existing offshore technology. Based on this hypothesis the objectives are: i)to explore the technologies needed for development of a new and simple floating offshore concept with a vertical axis rotor and a floating and rotating foundation, ii)to develop calculation and design tools for development and evaluation of very large wind turbines based on this concept and iii)evaluation of the overall concept with floating offshore horizontal axis wind turbines. Upscaling of large rotors beyond 5MW has been expressed to have more cost potentials for vertical axis wind turbines than for horizontal axis wind turbines due to less influence of cyclic gravity loads. However, the technology behind the proposed concept presents extensive challenges needing explicit research, especially: dynamics of the system, pultruded blades with better material properties, sub-sea generator, mooring and torque absorption system, and torque, lift and drag on the rotating and floating shaft foundation. In order to be able in detail to evaluate the technologies behind the concept the project comprise: 1) numerical tools for prediction of energy production, dynamics, loads and fatigue, 2) tools for design and production of blades 3) tools for design of generator and controls, 4) design of mooring and torque absorption systems, and 5) knowledge of friction torque and lift and drag on rotating tube. The technologies need verification, and in the project verification is made by: 6) proof-of concept testing of a small, kW sized technology demonstrator, partly under real conditions, partly under controlled laboratory conditions, 7) integration of all technologies in demonstration of the possibility of building a 5MW wind turbine based on the concept, and an evaluation of the perspectives for the concept.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2010-ITN | Award Amount: 4.04M | Year: 2010

Cement is the primary binding phase of concrete. It is millennia old and ubiquitous worldwide. As a building material, it is unrivalled in terms of tonnage used, price per tonne, and CO2 production per tonne. Yet its very success means that cement production account for about 5% of global man-made CO2 emissions. The cement industry urgently requires more sustainable cement based products with equal or better performance to current materials over the life time of buildings and infra-structure (~100 years). Most of the CO2 associated with cement manufacture comes mainly from the breakdown of limestone into calcium oxide and carbon dioxide. Therefore improvements must come from better materials with different chemistries. If the construction industry is to embrace new materials, then it must trust them. Water transport underpins almost all degradation. Degradation must be understood to ensure durability, which is the major obstacle to the introduction of new, more sustainable cementitious materials. Hence the industry is calling urgently for the researchers with the ability to predict water transport in concretes. Without this, there can be no confidence in the introduction and use of new materials; the status quo based on years of experience but relatively little scientific understanding will prevail for decades to come. Through the TRANSCEND Initial Training Network we will provide the trained personnel who can. (i) Enable the construction industry to predict water transport in cements and concretes and hence design appropriate tests to predict concrete degradation. (ii) Provide a basis for user confidence which enables the cement industry to introduce new more sustainable cements. The network will closely integrate the academic and private sectors. The later will directly employ 4 of the 15 fellows. The formal training programme will provide the basis for a European doctoral school in Cement and Concrete Science and technology.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-2-02 | Award Amount: 1.15M | Year: 2009

BrightAnimal will contribute to economically, socially and environmentally sustainable development by outlining a practical and acceptable methodology for precision livestock farming. To achieve this goal, BrightAnimal has the following mission: To produce a framework for European and non-European small and medium enterprises on effective and acceptable precision livestock farming and to create an international, interdisciplinary network for further development and dissemination. The main activity and achievement of BrightAnimal will be the elaboration of a book on effective Precision Livestock Farming in Europe and world-wide with special consideration of small and medium enterprises. The book aims at describing current and near-future techniques in PLF, especially taking into account both the practicality for SMEs as well as their acceptability (in the broader sense). The book will also try to set the scene for future developments. As the second component of the framework, BrightAnimal will produce best precision livestock farming practices (BPLFP) in a series of problematic areas such as aquaculture, beef, sheep and chicken. These best practice guides will be released to the public domain in the form of booklets. A third deliverable of the project will be a practical showcase activity showing the Good Practices in action in the European Centre of Excellence of Automatic Identification and Data Capture in the UK. BrightAnimal will organise interdisciplinary conferences for opinion exchange and cross-disciplinary discussions. It is of great importance to include opinions from outside Europe. We have been pleased to accept partners from the following ICPC countries: Thailand, Malaysia, South Africa, Brazil and China and from Australia as a third country. Other non-funded partners from third countries will also join the project.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2013.3.2 | Award Amount: 4.65M | Year: 2013

The aim of SSL-erate is to accelerate the uptake of high-quality SSL technology in Europe by means of open innovation with and by bringing validated information to all relevant stakeholders. A coordinated European effort is required to address the European societal challenges (in particular health & quality of life in an ageing society, energy consumption and resource efficiency), to resolve the specific challenges of the Lighting industry as noted in the results of the Green Paper Lighting the Future consultation (notably: poor SSL quality, lack of information and awareness among citizens) and to enable lighting solutions with a societal and environmental sustainability perspective, leading to a future in which Europe evolves to the global leadership in SSL systems and solutions. The lighting industry is highly fragmented. As a consequence of this the innovation speed and success rate have been too low and the benefits that we all expect from better lighting solutions, do not sufficiently materialize. To overcome this fragmentation, a collaborative way-of-working, using open-innovation and smart specialization principles, will be taken as the guiding approach. The active involvement of various stakeholders will be realized through workshops, but also through the creation of a web-based SSL-erate Innovation platform, which is planned to continue beyond the duration of this project. Relevant (lighting and non-lighting) companies, but also other stakeholders (like e.g. public authorities, property owners, research institutes, (lead) users/citizens, entrepreneurs, architects, installers) will become active contributors to this accelerated innovation process by applying validated insights on green business development and lighting effects on health & well-being in SSL business experiments.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2013.2.2-03 | Award Amount: 7.95M | Year: 2013

Vitamin D deficiency has significant implications for human health and impacts on healthy growth and development and successful aging. Fundamental knowledge gaps are barriers to implementing a safe and effective public health strategy to prevent vitamin D deficiency and optimize status. ODIN will provide the evidence to prevent vitamin D deficiency in Europe and improve nutrition and public health through food. By establishing an internationally standardized analytical platform for 25OHD, ODIN will measure the distribution of circulating 25OHD and describe the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Europe. Using available biobanks and databases from National nutrition surveys ODIN will delineate the relative contributions of sun and dietary sources of vitamin D to circulating 25OHD. In support of planned EFSA revisions of vitamin D recommendations, ODIN will carry out three RCT in pregnant women, children and teenagers and a fourth RCT in ethnic immigrant groups to provide experimental data to specify vitamin D intake requirements. Using dietary modeling, innovative food-based solutions to increase vitamin D in the food supply through a combination of bio-fortification of meats, fish, eggs, mushrooms and yeast will be developed and ODIN will test the efficacy and safety of these products in food-based RCT varying in scale from small product-specific trials to a large total diet study in vulnerable indigenous and immigrant sub-groups. ODIN has assembled the largest critical mass of prospective adult, pregnancy and birth cohort studies to date and will conduct meta-analyses and individual subject-level meta-regression analyses to integrate standardized data on vitamin D status, a priori defined clinical endpoints and genotype to examine relationships between vitamin D and human health, including beneficial and adverse effects, on perinatal outcomes, bone growth and body composition and allergic disease in children and cardiovascular disease and mortality in adults.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.4-04 | Award Amount: 12.16M | Year: 2013

Up to 20 million European citizens suffer from food allergy. However management of both food allergy (by patients and health practitioners) and allergens (by industry) is thwarted by lack of evidence to either prevent food allergy developing or protect adequately those who are already allergic. iFAAM will develop evidence-based approaches and tools for MANAGEMENT of ALLERGENS in FOOD and integrate knowledge derived from their application and new knowledge from intervention studies into FOOD ALLERGY MANAGEMENT plans and dietary advice. The resulting holistic strategies will reduce the burden of food allergies in Europe and beyond, whilst enabling the European food industry to compete in the global market place. Our approach will build on e-Health concepts to allow full exploitation of complex data obtained from the work in this proposal and previous and ongoing studies, maximising sharing and linkage of data, by developing an informatics platform Allerg-e-lab. This will enable us to (1) Extend and integrate existing cohorts from observation and intervention studies to provide evidence as to how maternal diet and infant feeding practices (including weaning) modulate the patterns and prevalence of allergies across Europe (2) Establish risk factors for the development of severe reactions to food and identify associated biomarkers (3) Develop a clinically-validated tiered risk assessment and evidence-based risk management approach for food allergens for allergens in the food chain (4) Develop clinically-relevant multi-analyte methods of analysis suited to allergen management across the food chain Stakeholders will be integrated into iFAAM to deliver harmonised integrated approaches, including RISK ASSESSORS AND MANAGERS managing population risk, the FOOD INDUSTRY who manage allergens to ensure consumer safety, HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONERS to provide food allergy management plans and dietary advice and ALLERGIC CONSUMERS to manage individual risk.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: AAT.2008.4.1.4.;AAT.2008.1.1.5. | Award Amount: 6.68M | Year: 2009

DAPHNE is an extensive update of the ENNET FP7-AAT-2007-RTD-1 proposal (scored 11.5: above evaluation threshold, but not retained due to budget constraints). Evaluation comments have been fully addressed; WP structure completely revised and the consortium strengthened, particularly by addition of Airbus as Technical Lead. Aircraft data networks have increased dramatically in complexity throughout the history of powered flight. Modern networks must support many nodes with a wide range of span lengths, bandwidths and protocols. Existing systems, chiefly based on copper conductors, have evolved to support these ever-increasing demands. These networks have consequently become larger, heavier and more expensive, and this trend is set to continue. A coordinated step change to fibre optics would reduce network size, weight and cost and improve the modularity, flexibility and scalability. Moreover, fibre brings many other advantages including EMC immunity and improved security. By defining networks according to a DAL-based hierarchy, the flexibility of photonics can be harnessed within the constraints of safety certification restrictions. Terrestrial telecoms provides a rich source of technology. However, R&D is required to adapt terrestrial photonics for aircraft networks. Cabin systems have been identified as the most immediate application area: here the need for high flexibility (driven by customisation), high bandwidth (driven by information-to-the-seat) and large node count mean that the technology and business cases for photonics are compelling. The primary objective of DAPHNE is to enable the full exploitation of terrestrial optical networking technology in future European aircraft and systems. The project will adopt key component and network technology from commercial markets and develop and validate future aircraft networks to take European aircraft systems capability well beyond current state-of-the-art and be suitable as a platform for future development


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2010.4.2.3-3 | Award Amount: 1.66M | Year: 2011

RESPONDER aims to develop, implement and evaluate a knowledge brokerage system on managing the contradictions of sustainable consumption and economic growth. Therefore the project will not just bridge the gap between science and policy, but will also improve the mutual understanding between what could be called the pro-growth community (i.e. economists and policy makers oriented towards the EU Lisbon Strategy) and the beyond-growth community (i.e. scientists oriented towards the limits to growth and policy makers involved in the sustainable development debate). In a series of EU dialogues a system map of sustainable consumption and economic growth will be developed together by researchers and policy makers in order to understand paradigmatic contradictions, conflicts of interest and trade-offs. The map will constitute the basis for systematizing empirical findings, questioning different assumptions, analysing policies and identifying new research questions. In a series of multinational knowledge brokerage events, the generic map will be applied to five policy areas (housing, energy, financial, transport and agricultural policies). An internet-based knowledge platform will support a continuous dialogue by trading information on facts, trends, policies and experiences based on system maps. Policy makers will benefit from RESPONDER by experiencing innovative forms of knowledge brokerage, by getting easy access to research findings and by networking. Researchers will benefit by understanding better the rationality of decision makers, by getting access to them, by improving the mutual understanding across different paradigms and by elaborating a joint research agenda. The consortium consists of 2 ministries, 5 universities and 3 research institutes, the Advisory Board consists of Members of the European Parliament, the business sector, NGOs and the OECD. RESPONDER is supported by policy makers from 20 European member states committing themselves to participate.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2011-1.1.10.;INFRA-2011-1.1.11. | Award Amount: 10.44M | Year: 2011

InGOS will support and integrate the observing capacity of Europe for non-CO2 greenhouse gases (NCGHG: CH4, N2O, SF6, H2 and halocarbons). The emissions of these gases are very uncertain and it is unknown how future climate change will feedback into the land use coupled emissions of CH4 and N2O. The NCGHG atmospheric abundances will increase further in the future and the emissions of these gases are an attractive target for climate change mitigation policies. InGOS aims to improve the existing European observation system so that this will provide us insight into the concentration levels and European and extra-European emissions of the NCGHGs. The data from the network will enable to better constrain the emissions of NCGHGs within the EU and show whether emission reduction policies are effective. The data from the network is designed to allow to detect the spatial and temporal distribution (hotspots) of the sources and to detect changes in emissions due to mitigation and feedbacks with climate change. To strengthen the European observation system, the project has several objectives: Harmonize and standardize the measurements. Provide capacity building in new member states and countries with inadequate existing infrastructure. Support existing observation sites and transfer of selected sites into supersites. Integrate and further integrate marine observations of the NCGHGs with land-based observations Improve measurement methods by testing new innovative techniques and strategies. Test advanced isotope techniques for application in the network to enable attribution of the atmospheric fractions to source categories Integrate data for network evaluation by using inverse modeling and data-assimilation methods and developments in bottom up inventories Link the network to remote sensing data of column abundances from in-situ and satellite observations Prepare for the integration of the NCGHG network with the Integrated Carbon Observation System


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 4.18M | Year: 2012

SEWPROF aims to develop inter-disciplinary and cross-sectoral research capability for the next generation of scientists working in the newly-emerging field of sewage epidemiology. It will provide an integrated approach towards public health monitoring at a community level based on innovative sewage epidemiology techniques. The approach will deliver real-time profiling of community-wide health and lifestyle through the analysis of human biomarkers in sewage using a wide-range of methods including hyphenated mass spectrometry techniques, bioanalytical techniques and real-time sensing. The innovative research strategy of obtaining epidemiological information from sewage has been pioneered by members of the SEWPROF team, and, although still in its infancy, is currently used to determine illicit drug use trends at community level via the analysis of urinary biomarkers in sewage. SEWPROF aims to advance knowledge of the epidemiology of (illicit) drug use and to bridge gaps in the available expertise with the ultimate goal of applying this cutting edge interdisciplinary approach within epidemiological studies of societal health. This conceptually simple but methodologically sophisticated epidemiological approach could become an early warning system for outbreaks of disease and a unique tool for the identification of hot-spots for pandemics. This will be achieved through bringing together leaders in the field across Europe in academia, research institutes and the private sector and utilising their expertise and commitment in training a highly employable cohort of researchers who will acquire advanced knowledge in the field through an interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral training programme delivered by world class research-led organisations and industrial partners.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2010.4-01 | Award Amount: 1.12M | Year: 2011

The objective is to further integrate/refine the EuroFIR Food Platform (EFP), to improve/support the ways research is undertaken into relationships between food, diets and health in Europe. Our focus is on extending application and exploitation of validated food data and tools for pan-European nutrition studies and networked usage, implementation of standards and best practice. This together forms the basis of long-term sustainability through the newly established legal entity EuroFIR AISBL). Six Work Packages are included: Quality standards & certification; Systems integration & operational support; Integration & business development; Training; Dissemination & Management. The revised consortium has 35 existing EuroFIR partners (18 as 3rd parties/EuroFIR AISBL members). The already achieved high-level institutional commitment will be further strengthened. The new General Assembly consists of executive representatives of all beneficiaries (who are also AISBL Members), thus real and durable integration is achievable. The Executive Board will work closely with EuroFIR AISBL to provide an integrated approach to joint activities and stakeholder engagements. A high-level External Advisory Board of key users/stakeholders from Europe and internationally will ensure that food data, other products and services are fine-tuned to stakeholders needs, keeping Europe at the forefront of leadership and innovation in this area. Outputs are consistent with the ETP `Food for Life and will further support Theme 2 (FP7) in food and nutrition research contributing to the structuring of the European Research Area and world-class scientific/technological excellence. Additionally, the outputs bring the EFP in alignment with the current European CEN Standard on Food Data and its application.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: SPACE | Award Amount: 6.00M | Year: 2014

The main objective of the MyOcean Follow On project will be to operate a rigorous, robust and sustainable Ocean Monitoring and Forecasting component of the pre-operational Copernicus Marine Service delivering ocean physical state and ecosystem information to intermediate and downstream users in the areas of marine safety, marine resources, marine and coastal environment and weather, climate and seasonal forecasting. This is highly consistent with the objective of the HORIZON 2020 Work Programme 2014-2015 establishing the need for interim continuity of the pre-operational services developed by MyOcean 2 before the fully operational services of Copernicus. The project proposes to sustain the current pre-operational marine activities until March 2015 in order to avoid any interruption in the critical handover phase between pre-operational and fully operational services. In effect, any significant interruption in these services could potentially jeopardize several important high-level policy objectives and undermine other related scientific activities. In the period from October 2014 to March 2015, MyOcean-FO will ensure a controlled continuation and extension of the services already implemented in MyOcean and MyOcean2 FP7 projects that have advanced the pre-operational marine service capabilities. To enable the move to full operations, MyOcean-FO is targeting the prototype operations, and developing the management and coordination to continue the provision of Copernicus Marine service products and the link with independent R&D activities. MyOcean-FO will produce and deliver services based upon the common-denominator ocean state variables that are required to help meet the needs for information for environmental and civil security policy making, assessment and implementation. MyOcean-FO is also expected to have a significant impact on the emergence of a technically robust and sustainable Copernicus Service infrastructure in Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP-SICA | Phase: OCEAN.2011-4 | Award Amount: 11.32M | Year: 2012

Environmental policies focus on protecting habitats valuable for their biodiversity, as well as producing energy in cleaner ways. The establishment of Marine Protected Area (MPA) networks and installing Offshore Wind Farms (OWF) are important ways to achieve these goals. The protection and management of marine biodiversity has focused on placing MPAs in areas important for biodiversity. This has proved successful within the MPAs, but had little impact beyond their boundaries. In the highly populated Mediterranean and the Black Seas, bordered by many range states, the declaration of extensive MPAs is unlikely at present, so limiting the bearing of protection. The establishment of MPAs networks can cope with this obstacle but, to be effective, such networks must be based on solid scientific knowledge and properly managed (not merely paper parks). OWF, meanwhile, must be placed where the winds are suitable for producing power, but they should not have any significant impact on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, or on human activities. The project will have two main themes: 1 - identify prospective networks of existing or potential MPAs in the Mediterranean and the Black Seas, shifting from a local perspective (centred on single MPAs) to the regional level (network of MPAs) and finally the basin scale (network of networks). The identification of the physical and biological connections among MPAs will elucidate the patterns and processes of biodiversity distribution. Measures to improve protection schemes will be suggested, based on maintaining effective exchanges (biological and hydrological) between protected areas. The national coastal focus of existing MPAs will be widened to both off shore and deep sea habitats, incorporating them into the networks through examination of current legislation, to find legal solutions to set up transboundary MPAs. 2 - explore where OWF might be established, producing an enriched wind atlas both for the Mediterranean and the Black Seas. OWF locations will avoid too sensitive habitats but the possibility for them to act as stepping-stones through MPAs, without interfering much with human activities, will be evaluated. Socioeconomic studies employing ecosystem services valuation methods to develop sustainable approaches for both MPA and OWF development will also be carried out, to complement the ecological and technological parts of the project, so as to provide guidelines to design, manage and monitor networks of MPAs and OWF. Two pilot projects (one in the Mediterranean Sea and one in the Black Sea) will test in the field the assumptions of theoretical approaches, based on previous knowledge, to find emerging properties in what we already know, in the light of the needs of the project. The project covers many countries and involves researchers across a vast array of subjects, in order to achieve a much-needed holistic approach to environmental protection. It will help to integrate the Mediterranean and Black Seas scientific communities through intense collective activities, combined with strong communications with stakeholders and the public at large. Consequently, the project will create a permanent network of excellent researchers (with cross fertilization and further capacity building) that will also work together also in the future, making their expertise available to their countries and to the European Union.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: COFUND-EJP | Phase: EURATOM | Award Amount: 856.96M | Year: 2014

A Roadmap to the realization of fusion energy was adopted by the EFDA system at the end of 2012. The roadmap aims at achieving all the necessary know-how to start the construction of a demonstration power plant (DEMO) by 2030, in order to reach the goal of fusion electricity in the grid by 2050. The roadmap has been articulated in eight different Missions. The present proposal has the goal of implementing the activities described in the Roadmap during Horizon 2020 through a joint programme of the members of the EUROfusion Consortium. ITER is the key facility in the roadmap. Thus, ITER success remains the most important overarching objective of the programme and, in the present proposal the vast majority of resources in Horizon 2020 are devoted to ensure that ITER is built within scope, time and budget; its operation is properly prepared; and a new generation of scientists and engineers is properly educated (at undergraduate and PhD level) and trained (at postdoctoral level) for its exploitation. DEMO is the only step between ITER and a commercial fusion power plant. To achieve the goal of fusion electricity demonstration by 2050, DEMO construction has to begin in the early 2030s at the latest, to allow the start of operation in the early 2040s. DEMO cannot be defined and designed by research laboratories alone, but requires the full involvement of industry in all technological and systems aspects of the design. Specific provisions for the involvement of industry in the Consortium activities are envisaged.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2011-1.2.2. | Award Amount: 5.16M | Year: 2011

OpenAIREplus will build a 2nd-Generation Open Access Infrastructure by significantly expanding in several directions the outcomes of the OpenAIRE project, which implements the EC Open Access (OA) pilot. Capitalizing on the OpenAIRE infrastructure, built for managing FP7 and ERC funded articles, and the associated supporting mechanism of the European Helpdesk System, OpenAIREplus will develop an open access, participatory infrastructure for scientific information. It will significantly expand its base of harvested publications to also include all OA publications indexed by the DRIVER infrastructure (more than 270 validated institutional repositories) and any other repository containing peer-reviewed literature that complies with certain standards. It will also generically harvest and index the metadata of scientific datasets in selected diverse OA thematic data repositories. It will support the concept of linked publications by deploying novel services for linking peer-reviewed literature and associated data sets and collections, from link discovery based on diverse forms of mining (textual, usage, etc.), to storage, visual representation, and on-line exploration. It will offer both user-level services to experts and non-scientists alike as well as programming interfaces for providers of value-added services to build applications on its content. Deposited articles and data will be openly accessible through an enhanced version of the OpenAIRE portal, together with any available relevant information on associated project funding and usage statistics. OpenAIREplus will retain its European footprint, engaging people and scientific repositories in almost all 27 EU member states and beyond. The technical work will be complemented by a suite of studies and associated research efforts that will partly proceed in collaboration with different European initiatives and investigate issues of intellectual property rights, efficient financing models, and standards.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: BG-08-2014 | Award Amount: 20.65M | Year: 2015

The overarching objective of AtlantOS is to achieve a transition from a loosely-coordinated set of existing ocean observing activities to a sustainable, efficient, and fit-for-purpose Integrated Atlantic Ocean Observing System (IAOOS), by defining requirements and systems design, improving the readiness of observing networks and data systems, and engaging stakeholders around the Atlantic; and leaving a legacy and strengthened contribution to the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). AtlantOS will fill existing in-situ observing system gaps and will ensure that data are readily accessible and useable. AtlantOS will demonstrate the utility of integrating in-situ and Earth observing satellite based observations towards informing a wide range of sectors using the Copernicus Marine Monitoring Services and the European Marine Observation and Data Network and connect them with similar activities around the Atlantic. AtlantOS will support activities to share, integrate and standardize in-situ observations, reduce the cost by network optimization and deployment of new technologies, and increase the competitiveness of European industries, and particularly of the small and medium enterprises of the marine sector. AtlantOS will promote innovation, documentation and exploitation of innovative observing systems. All AtlantOS work packages will strengthen the trans-Atlantic collaboration, through close interaction with partner institutions from Canada, United States, and the South Atlantic region. AtlantOS will develop a results-oriented dialogue with key stakeholders communities to enable a meaningful exchange between the products and services that IAOOS can deliver and the demands and needs of the stakeholder communities. Finally, AtlantOS will establish a structured dialogue with funding bodies, including the European Commission, USA, Canada and other countries to ensure sustainability and adequate growth of IAOOS.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 | Award Amount: 3.03M | Year: 2009

Growth in the European wind energy market has led to the manufacture of larger turbines (~ 7.5 MW). There are several challenges associated with these turbines, particularly offshore, e.g., vibrations/ damage of the flexible blades, mechanical drives/electric converters. These raise maintenance concerns and result in operational downtime, impacting on power systems and supply reliability. For these reasons there have been huge R&D investments creating the requirement for highly trained manpower in Europe. The SYSWIND network will train future engineers and scientists in truly multi-disciplinary and newly emerging scientific areas and technologies for next generation wind turbines. There are six research themes: new structural health monitoring (SHM), wireless sensor network (WSN), multi-body systems (including aerodynamics and geotechnics), semi-active vibration control, composite materials and power system modelling. In addition, complementary non-scientific training such as on commercialisation and IPRs will be provided to enhance the career prospects of the researchers. Besides seven leading Universities from Europe, the network includes (A) 2 SMEs specialised in R&D for wind turbines and geotechnics as full partners, (B) 4 companies training 7 researchers on WSN, vibration control and wind energy trading, (C) additional partners transferring complementary skills geared towards wind energy specialists, and (D) world class research groups such as from Stanford in the US, pioneers in the research fields addressed. The strong involvement of the industry will shape the training needs of the researchers and increase their employability. The association with the leading experts will aid the career development of the researchers and raise their profile. The network has the potential to establish new mutually-recognized inter-institutional courses jointly with industry partners, and thus strengthen the growth and competiveness of the wind energy sector.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA | Phase: SPA.2011.1.5-01 | Award Amount: 41.18M | Year: 2012

The main objective of the MyOcean2 project will be to operate a rigorous, robust and sustainable Ocean Monitoring and Forecasting component of the GMES Marine Service (OMF/GMS) delivering ocean physical state and ecosystem information to intermediate and downstream users in the areas of marine safety, marine resources, marine and coastal environment and climate, seasonal and weather forecasting. This is highly consistent with the objective of the FP7 Space Work Programme to support a European Space Policy focusing on applications such as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security), with benefits for citizens, but also other space foundation areas for the competitiveness of the European space industry. In the period from April 2012 to September 2014, MyOcean2 will ensure a controlled continuation and extension of the services and systems already implemented in MyOcean, a previous funded FP7 project that has advanced the pre-operational marine service capabilities by conducting the necessary research and development. To enable the move to full operations as of 2014, MyOcean2 is targeting the prototype operations, and developing the necessary management and coordination environment, to provide GMES users with continuous access to the GMES service products, as well as the interfaces necessary to benefit from independent R&D activities. MyOcean2 will produce and deliver services based upon the common-denominator ocean state variables that are required to help meet the needs for information of those responsible for environmental and civil security policy making, assessment and implementation. MyOcean2 is also expected to have a significant impact on the emergence of a technically robust and sustainable GMES service infrastructure in Europe and significantly contribute to the environmental information base allowing Europe to independently evaluate its policy responses in a reliable and timely manner


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2009.2.1.1 | Award Amount: 8.85M | Year: 2010

In this project we will increase the efficiency of thin-film silicon solar cells on flexible substrates by solving the issues linked to material quality, interface properties and light management, thus enabling lower production costs per Watt-peak. The general technological objectives of the project are the development of better materials and enhanced interfaces for thin film silicon solar cells, and to transfer the developed processes to an industrial production line. The most important project goals are: 1) Reduction of optical reflection and parasitic absorption losses: Design and industrial implementation of textured back contacts in flexible thin film silicon solar cells. 2) Reduction of recombination losses: Development and implementation of improved silicon absorber material. 3) Reduction of electric losses: Graded TCO layers which minimize the work function barrier between the p-layer and the TCO layer without loss of conductivity and transmission of the TCO. In addition, the top layer of the TCO stack should provide a good protection against moisture ingression. In order to achieve these objectives more in-depth knowledge is needed for several relevant key areas for thin film silicon solar cells. The main scientific objectives are: 1) Identification of the ideal texture for the back contact. This structure should maximize the light trapping in thin film silicon solar cells without deterioration of open-circuit voltage and fill factor. 2) Paradigm shift for the growth of microcrystalline silicon. In this project we want to show that it is possible to use microcrystalline silicon with high crystalline fractions leading to better current collection without voltage losses, and without crack formation when grown on nano-textured substrates. 3) Deeper understanding of moisture degradation mechanisms of common TCOs like ITO and AZO.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SST.2011.1.1-3. | Award Amount: 17.02M | Year: 2012

HERCULES was conceived in 2002 as a long-term R&D Programme, to develop new technologies for marine engines. It is the outcome of a joint vision by the two major European engine manufacturer Groups MAN & WARTSILA, which together hold 90% of the worlds marine engine market. The present proposed HERCULES-C project is the Phase III of the HERCULES Programme. In order to take marine engine technology a step further towards improved sustainability in energy production and total energy economy, an extensive integration of the multitude of the new technologies developed in Phases I and II is required. HERCULES-C addresses this challenge by adopting a combinatory approach for engine thermal processes optimization, system integration, as well as engine reliability and lifetime. The first Objective of HERCULES-C is to achieve further substantial reductions in fuel consumption, while optimizing power production and usage. This will be achieved through advanced engine developments in combustion and fuel injection, as well as through the optimization of ship energy management and engine technologies supporting transport mission management. The second Objective of HERCULES-C is to achieve near-zero emissions by integrating the various technologies developed in the previous research Projects, in Phases I and II. The third Objective is to maintain the technical performance of engines throughout their operational lifetime. This requires advanced materials and tribology developments to improve efficiency and reliability, as well as sensors, monitoring and measurement technologies to improve the controllability and availability of marine power plants. The project HERCULES-C structure of RTD work comprises 47 Subprojects, grouped into 10 Work Packages and 5 Work Package Groups, spanning the complete spectrum of marine diesel engine technology. The HERCULES-C Project has duration of 36 months, a Consortium with 22 participants. and a total budget of EUR 17 million.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.3.1-2 | Award Amount: 16.04M | Year: 2011

Antibiotics are essential therapeutics in the treatment of bacterial infections. However, the indiscriminate use of antibiotics has led to the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria that pose a major threat to human health as options for treating infections by these bacteria have become limited. The evolution, emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance genes are still only poorly understood and expanding our knowledge on these aspects will provide novel leads to combat the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The EvoTAR consortium gathers a multi-disciplinary group of leading European researchers in the fields of antibiotic resistance, microbial genomics and mathematical modelling. In addition, three research-intensive SMEs participate in EvoTAR, two of which are involved in the development of novel approaches to minimize the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. The purpose of EvoTAR is to increase the understanding of the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. EvoTAR will characterise the human reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (the resistome) by investigating the dynamics and evolution of the interaction between resistant and non-resistant bacteria from the human microbiome and the interrelations of the human resistome with non-human reservoirs of resistance genes. Novel methods will be used to quantify resistance transfer under controlled conditions in gene exchange communities. Mathematical modelling will be applied to predict gene flow between different reservoirs and to predict future resistance trends. Novel in vitro and in vivo models will allow the study of the efficacy of novel therapeutics aimed at reducing selection and spread of antibiotic resistance. The EvoTAR project will generate novel insights into the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance genes and thereby create opportunities for the development of novel interventions to curb the rising tide of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: OCEAN.2011-1 | Award Amount: 6.73M | Year: 2012

The key objective of the TROPOS project is the development of a floating modular multi-use platform system for use in deep waters, with an initial geographic focus on the Mediterranean, Tropical and Sub-Tropical regions but designed to be flexible enough not to be limited in geographic scope. The TROPOS approach is centered on the modular development where different types of modules can be combined as appropriate in each area. In this way, the TROPOS multi-use platform system is able to integrate a range of functions from the transport, energy, aquaculture and leisure sectors, in a greater number of geographical areas than if it was a set platform design. This subsequently provides greater opportunities for profitability. The TROPOS design will focus on a floating multi-purpose structure able to operate in, and exploit, deep waters, where fixed structures such as those piled in the seabed are not feasible. The multi-use platforms developed from the concept designs will have the potential to provide European coastal regions with appropriate aquaculture systems, innovative transport services as well as leisure and offshore energy solutions. The main S/T objectives of the project are: To determine, based on both numerical and physical modeling, the optimal locations for multi-use offshore platforms in Mediterranean, sub-tropical and tropical latitudes To research the relations between oceanic activities, including wind energy, aquaculture, transport solutions for shipping, and other additional services To develop novel, cost-efficient and modular multi-use platform designs, that enable optimal coupling of the various services and activities To study the logistical requirements of the novel multi-use platform To assess the economic feasibility and viability of the platform To develop a comprehensive environmental impact methodology and assessment To configure at least three complete solutions, for the Mediterranean, Sub-tropical and tropical areas


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.2 | Award Amount: 9.32M | Year: 2009

Europe possesses several experiment facilities holding the level 3 of bio safety, which is required to study the large majority of zoonoses, emerging diseases and a number of other animal infectious diseases. Most of them are nevertheless loosely connected, leading to redundancy. NAIF has as its strategic aim to realise the potential European leadership in animal infectiology by bringing together 14 L3 animal experiment infrastructures and organising the facilities in order to optimize their investigation and diagnostic/validation tools, achieve economies of scale and use the saved resources to modernise existing facilities in a coordinated manner. To achieve these goals, NADIR will 1) internally, upgrade the collaboration between the partners by setting an Internet-based joint workspace, strengthening the share of knowledge, best practices and ethical considerations, commonly managing biological resources, organising transnational access to the involved infrastructures, and jointly executing research activities designed to improve the services provided by these facilities; 2) externally, enhance access to the networks infrastructures by setting up a electronic portal presenting all the infrastructures and services offered by the network in a unified way, providing access of non-member institutions to these infrastructures, coordinating actions with other relevant initiatives, and jointly presenting safety and ethical recommendations. NADIR is organised around four types of activities: i) three networking activities, consisting of internal and external communication, knowledge and best practices sharing, and biological resources joint management; ii) three research activities, made up of characterising animal lines, improvement of infection monitoring tools, and development of new infection models for emerging diseases; iii) as many transnational access activities as infrastructures involved in the network; iv) one project management work package.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2010-4.0-3 | Award Amount: 22.10M | Year: 2011

The core concept of Accelerated Metallurgy is to deliver an integrated pilot-scale facility for the combinatorial synthesis and testing of many thousands of unexplored alloy formulations. This facility would be the first of its kind in the world and would represent a significant advance for metallurgy. The novel technology that enables this HTT facility is based on automated, direct laser deposition (DLD). The key feature of this technology is the way in which a mixture of elemental powders is accurately and directly fed into the lasers focal point, heated by the laser beam, and deposited on a substrate in the form of a melt pool, which finally solidifies to create a unique fully-dense alloy button with precise stoichiometry. This robotic alloy synthesis is 1000 times faster than conventional manual methods. Once produced, these discrete mm-sized samples are submitted to a range of automated, standardised tests that will measure chemical, physical and mechanical properties. The vast amount of information will be recorded in a Virtual Alloy Library and coupled with computer codes such as neural network models, in order to extract and map out the key trends linking process, composition, structure and properties. The most promising alloy formulations will be further tested, patented and exploited by the 20 end-users. Industrial interests include: (i) new lightweight fuel-saving alloys (<4.5 g/cm3) for aerospace and automotive applications; (ii) new higher-temperature alloys (stable>1000C) for rockets, gas turbines, jet-engines, nuclear fusion; (iii) new high-Tc superconductor alloys (>30K) that can be wire-drawn for electrical applications; (iv) new high-ZT thermoelectric alloys for converting waste heat directly into electricity; (v) new magnetic and magnetocaloric alloys for motors and refrigeration; and (vi) new phase-change alloys for high-density memory storage. The accelerated discovery of these alloy formulations will have a very high impact on society.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2010.1.2-07 | Award Amount: 6.06M | Year: 2011

COPEWELL aims to provide a better understanding of the underpinning mechanisms and basic knowledge about the physiology, biology, and behaviour of fishes and to give a deeper understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in coping styles. We will use an innovative hypothesis-driven multidisciplinary approach that aims to explore the links between brain function, behaviour and adaptive plasticity (WPs 1 and 2). Underlying mechanisms will be addressed by localising key elements of the stress-responsive serotonergic and learning and memory systems in the telencephalon, and for the first time also analyse rates of brain cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and expression of genes controlling other aspects of brain function, as learning and memory, in fish expressing different coping styles. The project will also focus on the understanding of how animals experience their world, based on appraisal theory and experimental studies of appraisal mechanisms in farmed fish, and not simply on the description of animal behaviour or stress responses (WP2 Appraisal). COPEWELL will further study the ontogeny of brain function and neuroendocrine stress responses in the call species Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and sea bream (Sparus aurata), and will provide new insights on the interrelations between different relevant husbandry practices, plasticity of brain function and stress response during early ontogeny. COPEWELL will explore potential consequences of early life stress experiences on the welfare and quality of juvenile fish, substantiate the concept of allostatic stress regulation in fish and determine thresholds between eustress that are considered positive for welfare and distress that can have severe negative consequences for fish welfare as: it will attempt to discriminate between normal adaptive stress responses and situations of potential consequence to animal welfare, in relation to different relevant husbandry practices and rearing methods (WP3Allostasis and WP4 Ontogeny). The expected impact the COPEWELL project is to deepen our knowledge on the development of the brain function, behaviour and stress response in relation to the different husbandry practises and rearing methods. It will also serve to define how short or long episodes of stress during the early life affect the welfare and quality of juveniles and adult fish (WPs 3 & 4). It will significantly contribute in providing and extending the knowledge basis for the development of tools such as new individual-based indicators for a better assessment of fish welfare, e.g. by identifying and verifying non-invasive indicators of coping styles. Perhaps most important, COPEWELL will provide a new framework, based on evolutionary principles and an understanding of subjective experience of welfare as an evolved survival mechanism, making welfare available for scientific inquiry.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2009.2.1.3.1;ENV.2009.1.1.3.1 | Award Amount: 8.93M | Year: 2010

The GHG-Europe project aims to improve our understanding and capacity for predicting the European terrestrial carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) budget by applying a systematic, comprehensive and integrative approach. GHG-Europe quantifies the annual to decadal variability of the carbon and GHG budgets of terrestrial ecosystems in EU27 plus Switzerland and in six data-rich European regions via data-model integration, diagnostic and predictive modelling. Models are calibrated by multi-site observations. Research includes CO2, CH4 and N2O in forests, croplands, grasslands, shrublands, peatlands and soils. Via an integrated approach, GHG Europe scales up consistently from local to regional and continental scale via scale dependent error propagation and systematic quantification of uncertainties, model validation at different scales and top-down verification by atmospheric inversion models. At regional and European scale lateral C transport by land use, trade and rivers are included. Variability in C and GHG budgets is attributed to natural (climate) and anthropogenic drivers (N deposition, land use, past and present management) by synthesis of past and emerging experiments, targeted observations in hot spots and hot moments and model sensitivity analyses. For this purpose, observations are extended to under-sampled regions and ecosystems with likely high importance for the European C budget: forests and land use change in Eastern Europe and Mediterranen shrublands. The future vulnerability of carbon pools and risks of positive feedbacks in the climate-carbon system are assessed by scenario analyses with biophysical models and by integrating feedbacks with socio-economic changes and EU climate and land use policies. GHG-Europe uses a bidirectional interaction with stakeholders to provide regular and timely scientific advice targeted to the emerging needs of the UNFCCC process and for implementing post-2012 climate commitments in Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-12-2014 | Award Amount: 8.82M | Year: 2015

Euromix aim to develop an experimentally verified, tiered strategy for the risk assessment of mixtures of multiple chemicals derived from multiple sources across different life stages. The project takes account of the gender dimension and balances the risk of chemicals present in foods against the benefits of those foods. Important concepts for this new strategy are prioritisation criteria for chemicals based on their exposure and hazard characteristics and evaluation of the role of mode of action in grouping chemicals into cumulative assessment groups. In-silico and in-vitro tools will be developed and verified against in-vivo experiments, with focus on four selected endpoints (liver, hormones, development and immunology) to provide a full proof-of-principle. The EuroMix project will result in an innovative platform of bioassays for mixture testing and refined categorisation of chemicals in cumulative assessment groups. New hazard and exposure models will be embedded in a model toolbox, made available for stakeholders through an openly accessible web-based platform. Access to the web-based tools will be facilitated by training. Criteria will be set and guidance will be written on how to use and implement the tiered test strategy. Dissemination and harmonisation of the approach within EU, Codex Alimentarius, and WHO will be achieved by involving a.o. WHO and US-EPA in the project and by the participation of experts playing a key role in helping establish international food safety policies. It is expected that the new mechanism-based strategy, the bioassay platform, the openly accessible web-based model toolbox, and clear guidance on a tiered hazard and exposure test and risk assessment strategy will boost innovation in the public and private sector, provide a sound scientific basis for managing risks to public health from chemical mixtures, ultimately reduce the use of laboratory animals, and support the global discussion of risk assessment policies for mixtures.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2011.1.4-5 | Award Amount: 1.98M | Year: 2011

The goal of this project is to develop multiscale theoretical models of biocompatible metallic nanomaterials and apply them for the analysis, design and optimization of the materials. Two groups of titanium based nanomaterials are considered (while the methods developed should be applicable to other metallic materials as well): nanostructured commercially pure titanium and shape memory NiTi alloy. The multiscale model of nanostructured titanium (nTi) includes atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) discrete dislocation dynamic model (DDD) of the nucleation, interaction and movement of dislocations, crystal plasticity models mechanical behavior of Ti nano-grains, coupled texture and substructure evolution model for severe plastic deformation of polycrystalline Ti, micromechanical analysis of the grain sizes and microstructures on the mechanical properties. The atomistic and micromechechanical modeling of martensitic transformation (or reorientation) lattice strain of NiTi alloys is carried out. The biocompatibility of these two groups of materials (MD modeling of the interactions between metallic nanoparticles and biological molecules) is studied theoretically. The theoretical studies and recommendations are validated experimentally and in practice.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2012.4.1-3 | Award Amount: 4.51M | Year: 2012

This project addresses the design and development of permanent magnets without rare earths but consisting on hybrid nanostructures based on metals and metal ferrite oxides. The metallic nanostructures offers high magnetization values while the ferrite oxide one provides high anisotropy. We intend to design and process novel permanent magnets based on traditional hard ferrites and additional new magnetic phases combined with a soft magnetic phase to achieve high magnetic performance through effective exchange-coupling of both magnetic phases. This phenomenon has been extensively studied in metallic systems but not in oxide nanocomposite permanent magnets, where the studies are very scarce mainly due to the difficulty in optimizing the magnetic properties because of microstructural complexities. In view of practical applications this will guarantee their use in some nowadays applications which are currently covered by more expensive rare-earth permanent magnets, simply because typical ferrites do not fulfill the required magnetic energy product. This no-mans-land applications area - characterized by required energy products between 35 to 100 kJ/m3 - includes fundamental fields such as diverse components for transport and energy applications. As an important consequence, the use of rare-earth based permanent magnets will be reduced to its maximum possible extent by fulfilling the needs for a broad applications range by these newly designed rare-earth free permanent magnets. This project is therefore important from a fundamental as well as from a practical point of view where the complementary expertise areas of the different groups will combine to achieve the proposed objectives.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-10a-2014 | Award Amount: 8.10M | Year: 2015

European aquaculture production provides direct employment to 80,000 people and a 3-billion annual turnover. Parasites cause severe disease outbreaks and high economic losses in finfish aquaculture. The overarching goal of ParaFishControl is to increase the sustainability and competitiveness of European Aquaculture by improving understanding of fish-parasite interactions and by developing innovative solutions and tools for the prevention, control and mitigation of the major parasites affecting Atlantic salmon, rainbow trout, common carp, European sea bass, gilthead sea bream and turbot. To achieve these objectives, ParaFishControl brings together a multidisciplinary consortium comprising 30 partners possessing world-leading, complementary, cross-cutting expertise and drawn from public and private research organisations, and the aquaculture industry. The consortium has access to excellent research facilities, diverse biological resources including host-parasite models, and state-of-the-art vaccinology, genomic, proteomic and transcriptomic technologies. The project will: 1) generate new scientific knowledge on key fish parasites, including genomics, life-cycle, invasion strategy and host-parasite interaction data, with special emphasis on host immunity, pathogen virulence and immunomodulation, providing a scientific basis for improved prophylaxis; 2) determine the transfer of parasites between farmed and wild host populations; 3) develop a wide range of novel prophylactic measures, including vaccines and functional feeds; 4) provide a range of advanced or alternative treatments for parasitic diseases; 5) develop cost-effective, specific and sensitive diagnostic tools for key parasitic diseases; 6) assess the risk factors involved in the emergence, transmission and pathogenesis of parasitic diseases; 7) map the zoonotic risks due to fish helminths and; 8) provide a catalogue of good husbandry practices to obtain safe and high-quality fish products.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-3-05 | Award Amount: 4.17M | Year: 2010

CamCon aims to improve the control of Campylobacter in primary poultry production in various parts of Europe and thereby enable the production of low-risk broilers. The project places great emphasis on ensuring rapid and effective dissemination of scientific achievements to end-users, in particular the EU poultry industry. The consortium consists of 10 participants from seven countries representing various parts of Europe. The participating institutions include national diagnostic laboratories, institutions providing research and advisory services and universities. The scientists involved have a strong background in Campylobacter research and have published many original publications in the field. CamCon will be a 4-year project with a total budget of 4.17 million where the scientific work is organized in five Work Packages: WP1 will study the epidemiology of Campylobacter in broilers in selected regions and climates of the EU and compare the sub-types found in chickens; WP2 will investigate the effectiveness and efficacy of pre-harvest interventions; WP3 will implement on-site, telecommunication-based, hands-free detection methods and develop quantitative screening methods; WP4 will develop second-generation farm-to-fork contamination models for more precise quantitative risk assessments; and WP5 will prepare guidelines, educational videos, Internet-based tools, and propose EU standards for producers, regulators and consumers, which are based on the results of the research carried out in the other Work Packages.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2011.3.7 | Award Amount: 52.35M | Year: 2012

ene.field will deploy up to 1,000 residential fuel cell Combined Heat and Power (micro-CHP) installations, across 11 key Member States. It represents a step change in the volume of fuel cell micro-CHP (micro FC-CHP) deployment in Europe and a meaningful step towards commercialisation of the technology. The programme brings together 9 mature European micro FC-CHP manufacturers into a common analysis framework to deliver trials across all of the available fuel cell CHP technologies. Fuel cell micro-CHP trials will be installed and actively monitored in dwellings across the range of European domestic heating markets, dwelling types and climatic zones, which will lead to an invaluable dataset on domestic energy consumption and micro-CHP applicability across Europe. By learning the practicalities of installing and supporting a fleet of fuel cells with real customers, ene.field partners will take the final step before they can begin commercial roll-out. An increase in volume deployment for the manufacturers involved will stimulate cost reduction of the technology by enabling a move from hand-built products towards serial production and tooling. The ene.field project also brings together over 30 utilities, housing providers and municipalities to bring the products to market and explore different business models for micro-CHP deployment. The data produced by ene.field will be used to provide a fact base for micro FC-CHP, including a definitive environmental lifecycle assessment and cost assessment on a total cost of ownership basis. To inform clear national strategies on micro-CHP within Member States, ene.field will establish the macro-economics and CO2 savings of the technologies in their target markets and make recommendations on the most appropriate policy mechanisms to support the commercialisation of domestic micro-CHP across Europe. Finally ene.field will assess the socio-economic barriers to widespread deployment of micro-CHP and disseminate clear position papers and advice for policy makers to encourage further roll out.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-19-2014 | Award Amount: 5.30M | Year: 2015

Strengthening food and nutrition security (FNS) in the EU requires a move towards a diet that supports sustainable food consumption and production. To gauge the policy reforms needed for this major societal challenge, the SUSFANS-consortium will identify how food production and nutritional health in the EU can be aligned. The multidisciplinary research agenda of SUSFANS will build the conceptual framework, the evidence base and analytical tools for underpinning EU-wide food policies with respect to their impact on consumer diet and their implications for nutrition and public health, the environment, the competitiveness of the EU agri-food sectors, and global FNS. Based on a conceptual model of the food chain and its stakeholders, SUSFANS will develop suitable metrics and identify major drivers for sustainable FNS, integrate data and modelling, and develop foresight for European sustainable FNS. Central asset is a coherent toolbox which integrates two complementary strands of state-of-the-art quantitative analysis: (i) micro-level modelling of nutrient intakes, habitual dietary patterns and preferences of individual consumers, and (ii) macro-level modelling of food demand and supply in the context of economic, environmental and demographic changes on various time-scales and for multiple sub-regions. The tools will bridge the current gap between policy analysis on the EU agri-food sector and the nutrition-health sector. Case studies and scenarios based on stakeholder input from consumers, food industry, farmers/fishermen, government and the scientific community, are instrumental in achieving this goal. The project will provide a comprehensive set of tools for assessing sustainable FNS in Europe, centred around the implications of the current diet for the sustainability of production and consumption in the EU, and the options for the EU agri-food sector (including fisheries and aquaculture) to improve future diets in the near future (up to 5 years) and in the long run (one or more decades ahead).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: MG-4.2-2014 | Award Amount: 11.46M | Year: 2015

The trend in navigational accidents no longer appears to decrease. In a Formal Safety Assessment (IMO NAV59-6, Annex 1) 5.544 navigational and 7.275 other accidents resulted in the loss of 6.264 lives (2001-2010). The coincide of EU policies on safer and more efficient waterborne operations and in particular the e-maritime initiative with IMOs strategy for e-navigation opens a unique window of opportunity to influence the maritime sector and make substantial impact. Funding of EfficienSea 2 will enable the consortium to exploit this window of opportunity, supporting EU policies and marine traffic management through services to: 1. Improve navigational safety and efficiency 2. Improve Arctic navigation and emergency response 3. Decrease administrative burdens 4. Improve environmental monitoring & enforcement Lasting impact will be ensured by five enabling actions: 1. Development of the Maritime Cloud a communication framework for both e-maritime and e-navigation - enabling efficient sharing of information between all maritime stakeholders 2. Maturing emerging communication technologies, improving ships connectivity 3. Proactive facilitation of standardisation to maximize adoption and impact 4. Showcasing solutions in two very different geographic areas. Web-based initial implementation of the services will be done in the Arctic and the Baltic 5. Ensure an ambitious upgrade of international maritime safety regimes through a strong participation in regulatory bodies including EU and IMO EfficienSea 2 has gathered a unique level of competence in a consortium of 32 partners from 10 countries representing authorities, academia, international organisations as well as equipment manufacturers combining all the right capacities for effectively achieving these ambitious objectives.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST.2010.1.1-2.;SST.2010.5.1-1. | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2011

With climate change coming to the forefront of societys perception, there is increasing pressure on all industries to CO2 emissions through increased efficiency and the maritime industry is no exception. The objective of ULYSSES is to demonstrate, through a combination of ultra slow speeds and complementary technologies, that the efficiency of the world fleet can be increased to a point where the following CO2 targets are met : Before 2020, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 30% compared to 1990 levels. Beyond 2050, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80% compared to 1990 levels. ULYSSES focuses on bulk carriers and tankers as these ship types produce 60% of the CO2 from ocean-going vessels . As bulk carriers and tankers are reasonably similar in design and operation, it is felt that investigating these ships will give the best value for money in terms of potential impact of the project. Additionally, it is more technically challenging to reduce the speed of these ship types as they are relatively slow speed already and therefore it is expected that directional stability and other seakeeping issues will arise. However, the results of the project will be directly transferable to other ship types. To achieve these goals, it is expected that the target speeds will be: Phase I - Existing vessel in 2020: ~10 knots Phase II - New vessel built in 2020: ~7.5 knots Phase III - New vessel built in 2050: ~5 knots


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2009.7.1.1 | Award Amount: 56.70M | Year: 2010

A group of 6 Transmission System Operators (Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany The Netherlands and Spain) with 2 generator companies, 5 manufacturers and research organisations, propose 6 demonstration projects to remove, in 3 years, several barriers which prevent the electric system from welcoming more wind electricity, and wind electricity from contributing more to the electric system. The full scale demonstrations aim at proving the benefits of novel technologies (most of them available from manufacturers) coupled with innovative system management approaches. The contribution of wind energy to the system will show how aggregated wind farms can provide system services (voltage and frequency control) in Spain. The aggregation of wind farms with flexible generation and loads will be demonstrated in Denmark using a scalable IT platform developed by a generator. Increasing the flexibility of transmission networks will be tested in Belgium (existing sensors and coordinated power flow control devices avoiding possible large scale instabilities induced by wind farms in the CWE region) and in Spain (dynamic wind power evacuation capacity using real-time computations based on short-term generation forecasts and use of a mobile Overload Line Controller). Off-shore wind farms are addressed from a security viewpoint. Secure HVDC meshed networks will be validated in France using simulations and full scale experiments of two different HVDC circuit breaker technologies. Off-shore wind farm shut downs under stormy conditions will be demonstrated in Denmark using the world largest off-shore wind farm with balancing power provided by the Norwegian hydro capacities through a HVDC link. The experimental results will be integrated into European impact analyses to show the scalability of the solutions: routes for replication will be provided with benefits for the pan European transmission network and the European electricity market as soon as 2014, in line with the SET plan objectives.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2008.10.1.2;NMP-2008-2.6-1 | Award Amount: 3.33M | Year: 2009

EFFIPRO will develop electrolytes and electrodes for proton conducting fuel cells (PCFCs) based on novel LaNbO4-type and similar proton conducting oxides that, unlike earlier candidates, are chemically stable and mechanically robust. The transport of H\ makes water form on the cathode side, avoiding fuel dilution and recycling and reducing risk of destructive anode oxidation, even at peak power. Moreover, the high operating temperature (e.g. 600 C) alleviates recycling of liquid water and coolants, and provides efficient heat exchange with heat grids or fossil fuel reformers. All these give PCFCs major benefits in fuel utilisation, overall efficiency, and system simplicity with reformed fossil fuels as well as hydrogen from renewables. However, the proton conductivities of candidate materials are insufficient, and the project aims to improve proton conductivity through doping strategies and interface engineering, investigating new classes of stable proton conducting oxides, and developing technologies for thin film electrolytes on suitable substrates. Novel cathodes will be devised, all to bring area-specific electrolyte and interface resistances down to 0.2 cm2 each within this first project. New production routes of precursors and materials are included, as well as surface kinetics research and cost reduction by mischmetal strategies. The project is accompanied by complementary national initiatives and projects e.g. on fundamental characterisation and interconnects. Novel PCFC technology involves high risk and long term research that needs concerted action from many actors including the emerging nano-ionics field. It is the aim that PCFCs by 2020 will be available, accelerate the use of fuel cells, reduce CO2 emissions, and increase efficiency by 10 % where applied, promote the hydrogen society, and be a dominating fuel cell technology. The project counts 7 partners in 5 countries, with leadership and PCFC dedication. It lasts 3 years and educates/trains 5 PhD/post-docs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: BIOTEC-3-2014 | Award Amount: 11.39M | Year: 2015

Oxygen functionalities are key functional groups in many of todays chemicals and materials. The efficient introduction of oxygen-functionalities into raw materials are key chemical transformations in bulk and fine chemicals. Innovative bio-catalytic oxidation routes using molecular oxygen (from air) under benign and mild (pH) conditions such as ambient temperature and pressure can greatly improve the sustainability and economics of processes, but were so far mainly been applied in the pharma segments. In this segment, the enzyme-catalyzed step often represents the highest added value and the high price of the end-product (> 1000/kg) justifies less than optimal enzyme production and limitations in its catalytic efficiency. In order to achieve the widening of industrial application of enzymatic bio-oxidation processes to also larger volume but lower price chemical markets, ROBOX will demonstrate the techno-economic viability of bio-transformations of four types of robust oxidative enzymes: P450 monooxygenases (P450s), Baeyer-Villiger MonoOxygenase (BVMOs), Alcohol DeHydrogenase (ADH) and Alcohol OXidase (AOX) for which target reactions have already been validated on lab-scale in pharma, nutrition, fine & specialty chemicals and materials applications. ROBOX will demonstrate 11 target reactions on large scale for these markets in order to prepare them for scale up to commercial-scale plants. ROBOX is industry-driven with 2 major industrial players and 6 SMEs. It will assess the potential of technologies applied to become platform technologies technologies (multi-parameter screening systems, computational methodologies, plug bug expression systems) for broad replication throughout the chemical industry. The markets addressed within ROBOX represent a joint volume of over 6.000 ktons/year. The introduction of bio-oxidation processes is expected to bring substantial reductions in cost (up to -50%), energy use (-60%), chemicals (-16%) and GHG-emissions (-50%).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.3-03 | Award Amount: 7.40M | Year: 2012

BIOINTENSE is directed at addressing the challenges of low productivity and process intensity frequently hampering the implementation of bioprocesses in industry. For the future of the next generation of chemical processes in Europe it provides the opportunity not only to address intensification but also to enable this in a rapid manner. BIOINTENSE will make use of -technology to develop economically feasible intensified processes by integration of separation and process control, and to create tools to speed up the characterization and assessment of different process options and technologies and biocatalysts for increased process intensity. A strong focus lies in increasing the scale of biocatalytic and cascade reactions and to improve the fundamental factors that affect the economic feasibility. Both numbering up and scale-up methodologies will be tested. The BIOINTENSE consortium is ideally suited to address the challenges in KBBE.2012.3.3-03 and to meet the objectives, as it spans across disciplines, academia and industry: SMEs with a strong technology base in the areas of integrating separation in bioprocessing, biocatalyst development, immobilization, -reactor fabrication, and on-line monitoring will ensure top of the line industry focused research with a strong focus on scale-up and implementation. There is an urgent need for these challenges to be overcome to move towards a European Knowledge Based BioEconomy to exploit the environmental savings and economic potential if such bioprocesses were in place. Building on the recent advances in molecular biology, the time is now right to develop the necessary process engineering methodologies and implementation strategies to unlock the full potential of bioprocesses.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.2-11 | Award Amount: 2.15M | Year: 2014

The overall vision of the OrAqua project is the economic growth of the organic aquaculture sector in Europe, supported by science based regulations in line with the organic principles and consumer confidence. OrAqua will suggest improvements for the current EU regulatory framework for organic aquaculture based on i) a review of the relevant available scientific knowledge, ii) a review of organic aquaculture production and economics, as well as iii) consumer perceptions of organic aquaculture. The project will focus on aquaculture production of relevant European species of finfish, molluscs, crustaceans and seaweed. To ensure interaction with all relevant stakeholders throughout the project a multi stakeholder platform will be established. The project will assess and review existing knowledge on fish health and welfare, veterinary treatments, nutrition, feeding, seeds (sourcing of juveniles), production systems, including closed recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS), environmental impacts, socio-economic and aquaculture economic interactions, consumer aspects, legislations and private standards for organic aquaculture. The results will be communicated using a range of media and techniques tailored to involve all stakeholder groups. Further, Multi Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) and SWOT analysis will be used to generate relevant and robust recommendations. A wide range of actors from several countries will participate and interact through a participatory approach. The 13 OrAqua project partners form a highly qualified and multidisciplinary consortium that includes four universities, five aquaculture research institutes, three research groups in social science, a fish farmer organisation, a fish farmer and two organic certification/control bodies. The main outcomes of the project will be recommendations on how to improve the EU regulation, executive dossiers and a Policy Implementation Plan (PIP). Further the project will deliver recommendations on how to enhance economic development of the European organic aquaculture sector.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2007-2.5-1 | Award Amount: 7.91M | Year: 2008

Piezoelectric multilayer actuators performance and reliability needs to be improved to meet the growing demand from end-users with many different types of applications. The high production costs and problems related to obtaining reliable components explain that the utilization of piezo actuators up to now is far from having reached its full potential. Noliac and its partners for the IP are proposing a radical innovation in the piezoelectricity field, based on an enhanced understanding of materials degradation. This will greatly improve the properties of long actuators, and thereby allow end-users to use them for new industrial applications. The actuators shall be able to sustain extreme conditions, including high temperature, humid environment, and high pressure and will provide extreme long-term reliability. The activities are divided in 4 work areas: Research in materials degradation and the development of ceramics, which offer better resistance to crack initiation and propagation and are less sensitive to extreme conditions (WP2-WP4). Two parallel approaches are followed to improve the interdigitated electrode technology for deposition ultra-narrow electrode paths in the laminated piezo materials (WP5-WP6). The development of optimized final components will be insured by the combination of the new piezoelectric materials with the new electrode technology (WP7). Industrial applications for the automotive-, production- and wind power industries. These applications require large size piezoceramic actuators, which can be produced efficiently at low cost with high manufacturing yield (WP8-WP11). The identification of the new piezoelectric actuators is expected to provide a radical innovation in terms of new possible applications in major industrial markets worldwide.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.6-02 | Award Amount: 9.37M | Year: 2013

The global chemical industry is transitioning from petrochemical production processes to bio-based production processes. This transition creates a clear market need for technologies that reduce the development time and cost of cell factories. PROMYS will develop, validate and implement a novel synthetic biology platform technology termed ligand responsive regulation and selection systems. Ligand responsive regulation and selection systems are biological devices that integrate biological sensing modules, within larger regulatory networks to control cellular programs. This technology will drastically accelerate the construction, optimization and performance of cell factories by enabling industrial users to impose non-natural objectives on the engineered cell factory. PROMYS will address three major challenges in metabolic engineering that limit the development of new cell factories: 1) Synthetic pathway construction 2) Cell factory optimization 3) Control of populations during fermentation Ligand responsive regulation and selection systems will directly couple the presence of a desired chemical product or flux state within a cell, to the survival of the cell. As such, they allow the in vivo identification of the needle (e.g. functional pathway or optimized cell factories) in a haystack (e.g. large libraries). In addition, the technology developed in PROMYS will be applied to deliver increased fermentation yields by continuously selecting for high yielding cell factories within the fermentation population. PROMYS is industry driven and designed such that the expected innovations of each work package have a direct commercialization partner, which is willing to commit the necessary resources to develop commercial products from the innovation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SiS.2013.1.3.3-2 | Award Amount: 1.95M | Year: 2014

FOSTER is a coordination initiative that aims to support different stakeholders, especially young researchers, in adopting open access in the context of the European Research Area (ERA) and in complying with the open access policies and rules of participation set out for Horizon 2020 (H2020). It will focus on integrating open access principles and practice in the current research workflow by targeting the young researcher training environment. In addition, FOSTER will strengthen the institutional training capacity to maintain compliance with the open access policies in the ERA and H2020, and will facilitate the adoption, reinforcement and implementation of open access policies from other European funders, in line with the European Commissions recommendation. FOSTER will establish a European-wide training programme on open access and open data, consolidating training activities at downstream level and reaching diverse disciplinary communities and countries in the ERA. Each type of stakeholder will be provided with a range of relevant training programmes, practical advice, support and help in engaging, dynamic and outcome-oriented way. Training toolkits will be developed and made openly available for re-use. The training programme will include different approaches and delivery options: elearning, blearning, self-learning, dissemination of training materials/contents, helpdesk, face-to-face training, especially training-the-trainers, summer schools, seminars, etc. The Consortium strength lies in its strong European network, and wide range of expertise gained thorough EU and national projects. The mix of strong technical partners and key players in the open access community can ensure that the project fully reaches out to a range of stakeholders, namely academic staff (researchers and students), institutions (administrators, librarians), research project managers (key stakeholders in implementing H2020 policy), and policy-makers and staff working in funding bodies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SST-2007-5.1-01 | Award Amount: 4.49M | Year: 2009

The automotive industry has recently seen a paradigmatic shift from design processes based on physical prototypes to a computationally aided product development process (PDP) based on virtual prototypes. To maintain the competitiveness of European car manufacturers, a significant reduction of lead development time is required. The main potential for improvement lies in further exploitation of virtual development and especially in further automation of these virtual processes through optimal design techniques. Optimal design techniques are mature and are being used in structural mechanics in the automotive industry, as well as in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the aeronautical industry. However, this potential has not yet been realised for CFD in the automotive industry. To integrate these methods into workflows within the routine PDP, the project will make advances with adjoint sensitivity methods, mesh-based and CAD-based shape optimisation, high-Reynolds number topology optimisation. Complete CFD optimisation workflows, i.e. chains of optimisation techniques adapted to the automotive processes for the early as well as later stages of development will be integrated into the PDP. Aspects of process stability, data management, storage, numerical efficiency will be addressed in conjunction with an analysis of current PDP practices. The current practices of organising the PDP will be analysed, the areas of potential for optimisation workflows identified and where necessary alterations of the PDP will be made. Key use cases within the design process defined by the two car manufacturers in the project will be demonstrated and the resulting reduction in lead time will be validated. European SMEs play a leading role in developing the software tools for the PDP and in supporting the car manufacturers in implementing these tools in their PDPs. Three SMEs with a track record of working with the automotive industry are partners in the project.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: Ocean.2010-2 | Award Amount: 16.58M | Year: 2011

Marine life makes a substantial contribution to the economy and society of Europe. VECTORS will elucidate the drivers, pressures and vectors that cause change in marine life, the mechanisms by which they do so, the impacts that they have on ecosystem structures and functioning, and on the economics of associated marine sectors and society. VECTORS will particularly focus on causes and consequences of invasive alien species, outbreak forming species, and changes in fish distribution and productivity. New and existing knowledge and insight will be synthesised and integrated to project changes in marine life, ecosystems and economies under future scenarios for adaptation and mitigation in the light of new technologies, fishing strategies and policy needs. VECTORS will evaluate current forms and mechanisms of marine governance in relation to the vectors of change. Based on its findings, VECTORS will provide solutions and tools for relevant stakeholders and policymakers, to be available for use during the lifetime of the project. The project will address a complex array of interests comprising areas of concern for marine life, biodiversity, sectoral interests, regional seas, and academic disciplines as well as the interests of stakeholders. VECTORS will ensure that the links and interactions between all these areas of interest are explored, explained, modelled and communicated effectively to the relevant stakeholders. The VECTORS consortium is extremely experienced and genuinely multidisciplinary. It includes a mixture of natural scientists with knowledge of socio-economic aspects, and social scientists (environmental economists, policy and governance analysts and environmental law specialists) with interests in natural system functioning. VECTORS is therefore fully equipped to deliver the integrated interdisciplinary research required to achieve its objectives with maximal impact in the arenas of science, policy, management and society.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2013.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 5.25M | Year: 2013

Water-borne viral diseases pose high risks for public health worldwide. The urban wastewater contains large number of pathogen viruses, and even the most advanced wastewater treatment is not safe for full removal of virus particles. The conventional biological water quality indicators do not provide adequate information about the presence of pathogenic viruses. The currently available reliable virus test - based on molecular biology - is expensive, time consuming and labour intensive, thus limited to few laboratories with sophisticated facilities and well-trained personnel, even though the protection of water networks against pathogenic viruses is crucial. In this project we aim to develop a novel, cost effective, portable, on-site detection system, which is capable for monitoring human enteric viruses in different freshwater bodies. The method is based on disposable microfluidic chip, in which the virus particles can be up-concentrated and detected by electrical readout with a detection limit of 0.01-1 virus/L. We will focus on selective detection of norovirus, Hepatitis A and rotavirus (the most prevalent viruses), but the sensor is capable to detect any other virus with relevant functionalization. The plug-and-play virus sensor chip will be integrated into a measurement unit, which will send the data to the monitoring station. The project will include laboratory and field tests and validation of the monitoring unit, development an early warning system and epidemic risk assessment, provide with exploitation possibilities at the end-users, economical assessment for positive production capacity and preparation for future standardization.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2008.2.2.2 | Award Amount: 10.82M | Year: 2009

The main objective of the project is to design, develop, construct and operate a grid connected 16 MW high energy efficient power plant in the southwest of Spain to be 100% fuelled with a significantly abundant biomass agricultural residue: corn stover. As a result, the further project objective is to demonstrate the plant high operation availability (over 8000 hours/year), its overall economic and technical feasibility, and to encourage the development of further similar biomass power plants in Europe in accordance with the EU energy strategies recently laid down in the Biomass Action Plan, SET plan and other related European policies. In order to reach the objectives, the project is led by a globally known industrial promoter of renewable energy installations, Acciona Energa from Spain, gathering a partnership with the most experienced European developer of industrial feeding systems from Finland, an SME with demonstrated experience in high technology boiler manufacturing, a technological centre experienced with power plants life-cycle analyses, and two Finnish and Danish centres acquainted with the current state-of-the-art knowledge on combustion of herbaceous biomasses. Around 28 million tonnes of corn stover are produced annually in Europe, of which considering that only 30% of it would be feasibly collected, about 75 plants in the range of 15-20 MW could be set in Europe in 2009-2015, which would supply about 10.4 TWh (Terawatt-hour) annually to the electricity grids for the use of the citizens


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-ARTEMIS | Phase: SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2011-6;SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2011-1 | Award Amount: 12.01M | Year: 2012

The SESAMO project addresses the root causes of problems arising with convergence of safety and security in embedded systems at architectural level, where subtle and poorly understood interactions between functional safety and security mechanisms impede system definition, development, certification, and accreditation procedures and standards. Intense market innovation is being held back by this root cause: the absence of a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of safety and security feature interaction. The proposed solution is to develop a component-oriented design methodology based upon model-driven technology, jointly addressing safety and security aspects and their interrelation for networked embedded systems in multiple domains (e.g., avionics, transportation, industry control). Key elements of the SESAMO approach are: a methodology to reduce interdependencies between safety and security mechanisms and to jointly ensure their properties constructive elements for the implementation of safe and secure systems procedures for integrated analysis of safety and security an overall design methodology and tool-chain utilizing the constructive elements and integrated analysis procedures to ensure that safety and security are intrinsic characteristics of the system. The relevance of the SESAMO results is guaranteed by the involvement of large partners with significant economic interests in safety and security critical systems in the use case domains: automotive, aerospace, energy, mobile medical, and metropolitan rail transport; a sound group of technology providers (including SMEs); and prestigious research entities (academia and institutes) with deep and complementary multi-domain expertise. SESAMO will enable cost-efficient and systematic design, analysis, development, and assessment of distributed safety and security critical embedded systems. The results will have broad, cross-domain applicability in numerous strategic sectors of European industry. Approved by ARTEMIS-JU on 22/02/2012, Amendment 1 approved by ARTEMIS-JU on 27/02/2014, Amendment 2 approved by ECSEL-JU on 18/02/2015.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2011.1.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 10.93M | Year: 2011

CLAIRE investigates the ways in which climate change alters the threat of air pollution on European land ecosystems including soils. Based on field observations, experimental data and models, it establishes new flux, concentration and dose-response relationships, as a basis to inform future European policies. Starting with biosphere-atmosphere exchange measurements, CLAIRE quantifies how global warming and altered precipitation will affect emissions of key European primary pollutants (NOx, NH3, VOCs), including interactions with increasing aerosol and hemispheric O3 background concentrations, modifying atmospheric transport and deposition. An ensemble of chemistry transport models will be applied to assess uncertainty in response to harmonized scenarios for climate, emissions and land-use, while high resolution studies will investigate how climate change alters local patterns of pollutant exposure and threshold exceedance. A network of European experiments for contrasting ecosystems and climates, combined with meta-analysis of unpublished datasets, will quantify how climate change alters ecosystem vulnerability to tropospheric O3 and N deposition, including interaction with increased CO2. Combined with special topics on interactions with N form (wet/dry, NHx/NOy), aerosol-exacerbated drought stress and BVOC self-protection of O3 effects, novel threshold and dose-response approaches will be developed. These will be combined with regional atmospheric and biogeochemical models to estimate interactions and feedbacks on plant/soil carbon stocks, greenhouse gas balance and plant species change. The new risk assessment chain to be developed will be applied at the European scale, quantifying how projected climate change will alter damage estimates. Combined with economic valuation of ecosystem services, improved integrated assessment modelling will allow a cost-benefit analysis to inform future mitigation and adaptation strategies on air pollution and climate change.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.98M | Year: 2013

The objective is to deliver a trans-European network of industrially oriented specialists fully trained in the development and application of microbioreactor (MBR) technology to support development of innovative bio-based manufacturing processes. The specialistis will be trained by leaders in the field and with state of the art equipment and methodologies. MBRs are a promising tool for screening and scale-up of fermentation and biocatalysis processes due to their low production cost, small working volumes, flexibility and their potential for information-rich experiments under well-controlled experimental conditions. In this consortium, we will further develop MBRs for chemical and biochemical screening, paying special attention to MBR parallelization and applicability for different applications. In addition, characterization of experimental uncertainty, development of reactant feeding strategies at micro-scale and coupling of microscale experimentation to automated design of experiments (DoE) will document applicability of MBRs for chemical and biochemical research. To enhance the applicability of microfluidic enzymatic reactors for organic synthesis, we will establish microfluidic chemo-biocatalytic reaction systems that enable rapid characterization of biosynthetic pathways and chemo-enzymatic conversions. This will be underpinned with immobilization methods that permit rapid and reversible binding of a range of biocatalysts and modeling that relates the kinetic data with results from larger scales. Complemented with precisely positioned fluorescence-based sensor arrays, novel nanosensor particle concepts, and integrated Raman and NIR probes, the MBRs will deliver the data-rich experimentation needed for industrial applications. Data processing and information management will be accomplished by developing CFD and mathematical modeling methods that permit prediction and interpretation of fermentation and biocatalytic processes in MBRs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-3-02 | Award Amount: 4.09M | Year: 2009

Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the worlds most infectious diseases of livestock and continues to pose a significant threat to endemic and free regions alike. The impact of FMD on society and international trade is high, thereby demanding stringent prevention, surveillance and control plans taken up in crisis preparedness plans. On the other hand, there is a global increased demand for animal welfare and ethical considerations necessitating a decreased reliance on eradication of animals to control FMD virus (FMDV) spread, and on the use of animals for the regulatory testing of veterinary products. The project seeks to balance these apparently contracting viewpoints by addressing specific gaps in our knowledge on all aspects of FMD control to enable implementation of enhanced animal-sparing vaccine-based control strategies tailored to the needs of free and endemic settings. Consequently, four main objectives have been identified, including (i) the improvement of the quality of existing FMD vaccines and diagnostics, (ii) the refinement and replacement of in vivo FMD vaccine quality tests, (iii) the development of new generation FMD vaccines and diagnostics by applying cutting edge technologies, and (iv) the enhancement of our knowledge on FMDV spread and transmission following the use of high-potency monovalent or multivalent vaccines. The role of wildlife (buffalo, gazelles and wild boar) in FMDV maintenance and transmission will also be investigated. The project consists of seven different, yet interlinked, work packages (WP) each addressing one of the items listed in the Work Programme topic KBBE-2008-1-3-02, and led by renowned WP leaders with years of relevant experience in the field of FMD. As such, significant progress towards the objectives of the Communitys Animal Health Strategy (2007-2013), the European Technology Platform for Global Animal Health, and the Global Roadmap for improving the Tools to Control FMD in Endemic Settings will be achieved.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.1.1.1.1. | Award Amount: 13.64M | Year: 2009

The melting of continental ice (glaciers, ice caps and ice sheets) is a substantial source of current sea-level rise, and one that is accelerating more rapidly than was predicted even a few years ago. Indeed, the most recent report from Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlighted that the uncertainty in projections of future sea-level rise is dominated by uncertainty concerning continental ice, and that understanding of the key processes that will lead to loss of continental ice must be improved before reliable projections of sea-level rise can be produced. The ice2sea programme will draw together European and international partners, to reduce these uncertainties. We will undertake targeted studies of key processes in mountain glacier systems and ice caps (e.g. Svalbard), and in ice sheets in both polar regions (Greenland and Antarctica) to improve understanding of how these systems will respond to future climate change. We will improve satellite determinations of continental ice mass, and provide much-needed datasets for testing glacier-response models. Using newly developed ice-sheet/glacier models, we will generate detailed projections of the contribution of continental ice to sea-level rise over the next 200 years, and identify thresholds that commit the planet to long-term sea-level rise. We will deliver these results in forms accessible to scientists, policy-makers and the general public, which will include clear presentations of the sources of uncertainty. The ice2sea programme will directly inform the ongoing international debate on climate-change mitigation, and European debates surrounding coastal adaptation and sea-defence planning. It will leave a legacy of improved understanding of key cryospheric processes affecting development of the Earth System and the predictive tools for glacier-response modelling, and it will train a new generation of young European researchers who can use those tools for the future benefit of society.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2012.1.6-1 | Award Amount: 4.84M | Year: 2014

The detection of illegal compounds is an important analytical problem which requires reliable, selective and sensitive detection method that provides the highest level of confidence in the result. Moreover, to contribute in the successful development the automated target acquisition, identification and signal processing of data from the sensor is mandatory. Enhancements to sensing methods, recognition ability and target detection time lead with the algorithms improvements in software that is complementary to improving sensor hardware. In the end, the sensing device should be portable, rapid, easy in use, highly sensitive, specific (minimal false positives), and low cost. SEC.2012.1.6-1 Digital, minituarised, operational tool for investigation Capability project would be suitable to our research activity. We aim in the end of the project to demonstrate a working sensing device that can be further developed into a portable, miniaturized, automated, rapid, low cost, highly sensitive, and simple, sniffer and detection unit based on a disposable micro-colorimetric chip, which can be used for identification of illegal drugs or drug precursors. The project will combine highly advanced disciplines, like organic chemistry, micro fabrication and hardware technology, machine learning and signal processing techniques, to support the development of a miniaturized sensor system that can be used for identification of illegal drugs or drug precursors providing custom officers, police etc. with an effective tool to control trafficking of illegal drugs and drug precursors.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.19M | Year: 2011

The NEWGENPAK ITN is an interdisciplinary research training network of 8 European universities, 3 research institutes and 6 enterprises, three of which are Full partners. Its primary aim is to create a European training network designed to improve the career prospects of its 10 ESRs and 2 ERs in both the public and private sector. The network will deliver a joint multidisciplinary research training programme which will encourage and foster the growth of the researchers skills in scientific expertise, technological knowledge and professional aptitude. The key vehicle in this strategy is a supervised personal, original research project in a critical aspect of sustainable packaging. The network has been designed to achieve the following objectives (i) to conduct top-level research and training and devise innovative solutions for specific EU needs in the area of sustainable packaging, (ii) to advance the state-of-the-art in wood cellulose based sustainable packaging in three specific areas (a) next generation packaging composites, (b) cellulose-fibre based active packaging and (c) environmental, economic and societal aspects of packaging production, (iii) to educate the next generation of researchers inside a broad European research training network which includes universities, research centres and industry, thereby accelerating the researchers advancement to team leader status, (iv) to improve the career prospects of ERs and ESRs through complementary training such as; writing and presentation skills; language, effective communication and collaboration; project management and finance; project/product cycles; entrepreneurship; IPR, (v) to create an integrated, long-term sustainable packaging research and training base in the EU by bringing together universities, research institutes and industrial players active in key research disciplines.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.3.5 | Award Amount: 13.40M | Year: 2012

Biophotonics offers low-cost, non-invasive, accurate, rapid alternatives to conventional diagnostic methods and has the potential to address medical needs with early detection and to reduce the cost of healthcare. FAMOS will develop a new generation of light sources with step-changes in performance beyond the state-of-the-art to radically transform biophotonic technologies for point-of-care diagnosis and functional imaging. This will enable optical diagnostics with superior sensi-tivity, specificity, reliability and clinical utility at reduced cost, heralding an imaging renaissance in Europe.FAMOS addresses optical imaging from molecular over (sub)cellular to individual organs, with no gap in the arsenal of diagnostic tools for medical end-users. The world-class multidisciplinary FA-MOS team of 7 leading academic institutions and 10 top SMEs has unique complementary knowledge of optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics, photoacoustic tomography, coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering, multiphoton tomography as well as swept-source, diode-pumped ultrafast and tuneable nanosecond pulse lasers. Combinations of some techniques will offer multi-modal solutions to diagnostic needs that will exploit and enhance the benefits of each modality. FAMOS technologies have wide applicability, but our specific focus is on diagnosis in ophthalmol-ogy and oncology. Partnerships with leading innovative clinical users will enable preclinical evalua-tion.The objectives of FAMOS are:\tDevelop new light sources with a step-change in performance (2-3 times more compact and up to 3-4 times cheaper diode pumped Ti:sapphire, 4-10 times faster swept sources and tuneable nanosecond pulse sources)\tIntegrate these with optical imaging for a step-change in diagnosis (2-5 times better resolution cellular retinal imaging with more than 10 times larger field of view, up to 10 times enhanced penetration single source subcellular morphologic imaging, increased selectivity of intrinsic mo-lecular sensing as well as several frames per second deep tissue functional tomography\tPerform preclinical studies to demonstrate novel or improved ophthalmic and skin cancer diag-nosis establishing novel biomarkers (melanocyte shape, NADPH, melanin concentration, Hb/HbO2 as well as lipid, water and DNA/RNA concentration)\tEnable exceptional commercial opportunities for SMEs\tProvide state-of-the-art academic training


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SPA-2007-1.1-01 | Award Amount: 55.01M | Year: 2009

MyOcean is THE PROJECT to set up infrastructures, services and resources to prepare the operational deployment of first Marine Core Services. My Ocean answers to the topic SPA.2007.1.1.01 - development of upgraded capabilities for existing GMES fast-track services and related (pre)operational services. MyOcean is proposed by a consortium of 67 partners spread in maritime countries: - federated around a core team of MCS operators - connected to Key R&D players with independent experts - rich of key intermediate users ready to commit to the service validation and promotion and play the role of beta-testers. My Ocean is not the MCS but shall provide the major building blocks and umbrella to allow the operational deployment of a full MCS in cooperation with external providers (National Met services, EMSA, ). MyOcean proposes to set an incremental logic and a governance to remain sustainable after the project and able to welcome new science and new services. The project includes the following tasks: - The definition of a first set of operational Marine Core Services, first package of an enlarged MCS portfolio - The operational development of European upgraded capacities acting as a common denominator for Member States, EU needs for reference marine information - The pre-operational validation of these MCS infrastructures and services and their formal commissioning - The marketing and promotion of Marine Core Services for use widening - The elaboration of a committed organisation to support at long term MCS operations, evolution and research. My Ocean inherits, benefits and pursues a European operational oceanography strategy started within EUROGOOS networks, and progressively implemented through subsequent projects: MERSEA Strand1, MERSEA, BOSS4. BOSS4 will provide a Version 0 of Marine Core Services fast tracks. MyOcean work plan shall cover the development, validation and pre-operations of the following versions of MCS V1 and V2.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.6-01 | Award Amount: 11.70M | Year: 2013

The Nano3Bio project convenes a consortium of world renowned experts from 8 EU universities, 1 large company, and 14 SME, to develop biotechnological production systems for nanoformulated chitosans. Chitosans, chitin-derived polysaccharides varying in their degree of polymerisation (DP), degree of acetylation (DA), and pattern of acetylation (PA), are among the most versatile and most promising biopolymers, with excellent physico-chemical and material properties, and a wide range of biological functionalities, but their economic potential is far from being exploited due to i) problems with reproducibility of biological activities as todays chitosans are rather poorly defined mixtures, and ii) the threat of allergen contamination from their typical animal origin. The Nano3Bio project will overcome these hurdles to market entry and penetration by producing in vitro and in vivo defined oligo- and polymers with controlled, tailor-made DP, DA, and PA. Genes for chitin synthases, chitin deacetylases, and transglycosylating chitinases/chitosanases will be mined from different (meta)genomic sources and heterologously expressed, the recombinant enzymes characterized and optimized by protein engineering through rational design and molecular evolution, e.g. targeting engineered glycosynthases. These enzymes and genes will be used for in vitro and in vivo biosynthesis in microbial and microalgal systems, focusing on bacteria and diatoms. The bioinspired chitosans will be formulated into biomineralised hydrogels, nanoparticles, nanoscaffolds, etc., to impart novel properties, including by surface nano-imprinting, and will be bench-marked against their conventional counterparts in a variety of cell based assays and routine industrial tests for e.g. cosmetics and pharma markets. The process will be accompanied by comprehensive life cycle assessments including thorough legal landscaping, and by dissemination activities targeted to the scientific community and the general public.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE.2010.3.5-01 | Award Amount: 3.95M | Year: 2011

BIOTREAT brings together six research institutions and four SMEs to develop much-needed water treatment biotechnologies for removing pesticides, pharmaceuticals and other organic micropollutants from contaminated drinking water resources. These biotechnologies will be developed into prototype biofilter systems ready for subsequent commercialisation. The biofilters will contain non-pathogenic pollutant-degrading bacteria, with the bacteria being immobilised on specific carriers to ensure their prolonged survival and sustained degradative activity. Through beyond state-of-the-art research, BIOTREAT will ensure that these novel water treatment biotechnologies are highly transparent, reliable and predictable. Two complementary biotreatment strategies will be followed, one based on metabolic processes whereby the bacteria completely mineralise specific micropollutants and the other based on cometabolic degradation utilising the ability of methane- and ammonium-oxidising bacteria to unspecifically degrade a range of micropollutants for which specific degraders are not yet available. The biofilter systems will be carefully validated through cost-benefit analysis and environmental life cycle assessment. A road map will be drawn up for post-project exploitation, including individual SME business plans. Effective dissemination of the BIOTREAT results will be ensured by close collaboration with an End-user Board comprised of representatives from waterworks, water authorities, industry, etc. In addition to bringing considerable advances to water treatment biotechnology, the main outcome of BIOTREAT will thus be prototype biofilter systems (metabolic and cometabolic) ready for commercialisation in a number of highly relevant water treatment scenarios, including existing sand filters at waterworks, mobile biofilters placed close to groundwater abstraction wells, sand barriers between surface waters and abstraction wells, and protective barriers in aquifers.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.5-01 | Award Amount: 3.67M | Year: 2012

SENSE will deliver a harmonised system for the environmental impact assessment of food&drink products. The research will evaluate existing relevant environmental impact assessment methodologies, and consider socio-economical, quality and safety aspects, to deliver a new integral system that can be linked to monitoring and traceability data. The system will integrate: (a) (regionalised) data gathering system; (b) matrix of key environmental performance indicators; (c) methodology for environmental impact assessment; and (d) a certification scheme. The methodology will be transferred to food&drink sectors and stakeholders by means of specific communications strategies. SENSE will validate the new harmonised system in the juice, meat&dairy and aquaculture chains. However, the methodology and its associated software will be modular allowing its implementation in any food product. The sustainability information collected along the production cycle of any food stuff and reflected into the EID (Environmental Identification Document) will be accessible by the EID-Communication Platform, contributing to make the environmental sustainability part of the usual purchasing behaviour of consumers and provide a competitive advantage to those products which choose to use the EID. Main results of SENSE will be: (i)Standard key environmental performance indicators (KEPI); (ii)Harmonised methodology for environmental impact assessment; (iii)SENSE-tool for environmental data collection; (iv)EID and EID-Communication Platform; (v)Certification Scheme Concept (CSC) for sustainability; (vi)Roadmap for policy and governance implementation. SENSE consortium is formed by a multidisciplinary team involving 23 partners from 13 countries made up by a combination of complementary profiles: research organisations, food and drink SMEs, environmental and LCA experts, SMEs for dissemination and communication and European food Associations.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.76M | Year: 2013

The main research goal of HEXACOMM is to apply scientifically-based modelling and experimental methods to relate concentrations of particulate matter in the indoor domestic environment to its sources and human exposure implications. The second research objective is to determine the human exposure arising from such exposure at both individual and collective (population) scales at modern microenvironments. Contributions from outdoor air will be taken into account. The central idea of HEXACOMM is that a combination of tools and methods will enable us to relate indoor air quality to aerosol contaminants in urban homes, offices, vehicles with human exposure in a quantitative manner. To achieve our goal and objectives we propose to undertake, in parallel, a carefully designed validation programme at the European scale combining specifically targeted indoor air quality measurements, source apportionment studies, micro-environmental modelling, dosimetry modelling and exposure studies. Ultimately, our vision is that such enhanced understanding of the underpinning science will lead to improved indoor air quality in European domestic environments, while facilitating development of strategies to mitigate the impacts of aerosols on human exposure.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.2.2.1.1. | Award Amount: 8.64M | Year: 2009

The increasing pressures upon the marine realm call for a well planned approach of further spatial development of this area. An ecosystem-based approach to fisheries, the increasing demand for sustainable energy, coastal defence systems, building materials and safe transport routes and the need to protect marine habitats and species all compete for the same valuable space. At the same time climate change will alter the composition and functioning of marine ecosystems, calling for a robust approach of future spatial planning that also takes cross boundary developments into account. MESMA will supply innovative methods and integrated strategies for governments, local authorities, stakeholders and other managerial bodies for planning and decision making at different local, national and European scales. This will also comprise an easy accessible information system to gain support from politicians, stakeholders and the public in general for difficult (inter)national decisions that will be needed for sustainable use and protection of this vulnerable area. This data system, containing information on the distribution of marine habitats and species, economic values and benefits and human uses and its effects will also be an interface between science, policy and decision makers. MESMA will supply strategic tools for sustainable development of European seas and coastal areas. The major challenge is to combine an optimized use with a sustained ecosystem of high quality, taking into account ecological and economic differences. By studying and comparing different national situations and solutions from a selected number of sites throughout Europe and by determining common features and differences, including the socio-economic settings and requirements, an integrated toolbox that can be applied throughout Europe will be made available.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: COMPET-10-2014 | Award Amount: 2.06M | Year: 2015

The Youth for Space Challenge - ODYSSEUS II project aims to inspire young people from all over Europe and to engage them in space exploration, through a series of educational activities, which will combine scientific learning with hands-on experiences. Through the organization of a fun oriented educational contest, which will be organized in multi rounds and which will target all pupils and students in Europe, wherever they are living and irrespective of their cultural background and the language they speak, the project will foster the development of qualified scientists, engineers and technicians in areas relevant to the priorities of the EU space policy. Besides the objective of providing the Space challenge to young people, the Odysseus II project will also strive to foster international collaboration and to attract attention to the field of science education related to space exploration. In this respect, the objective of the project is to involve national educational authorities and to engage with space industries and many science centres and space agencies across Europe on the exchange of experiences and knowledge on learning programmes about space exploration. Participation in the Odysseus II contest will be used as a good benchmark and indicator of how well space science and technology is accepted and integrated into the curriculum of different educational systems across the EU. Since educational competitions in general enjoy broader acceptance, the Odysseus II contest will also provide the opportunity to space industry and national educational authorities to show their support to educational activities related to space.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA | Phase: Fission-2013-3.4.1 | Award Amount: 5.53M | Year: 2013

COMET will strengthen the pan-European research initiative on the impact of radiation on man and the environment by facilitating the integration of radioecological research. COMET will build upon the foundations laid by the European Radioecology Alliance (ALLIANCE) and the on-going FP7 STAR Network of Excellence in radioecology. By collaborating with the European platforms on nuclear and radiological emergency response (NERIS) and low dose risk research (MELODI), COMET will significantly aid preparation for the implementation of the Horizon 2020 umbrella structure for Radiation Protection. In close association with STAR and the ALLIANCE, COMET will take forward the development of a Strategic Research Agenda as the basis for developing innovative mechanisms for joint programming and implementation (JPI) of radioecological research. To facilitate and foster future integration under a common federating structure, research activities developed within COMET will be targeted at radioecological research needs that will help achieve priorities of the NERIS and MELODI platforms. These research activities will be initiated in collaboration with researchers from countries where major nuclear accidents have occurred. Flexible funds, unallocated to specific tasks at project initiation, have been included within the COMET budget to facilitate RTD activities identified through the JPI mechanisms developed that are of joint interest to the ALLIANCE, NERIS and MELODI. It will also strengthen the bridge with the non-radiation community. Furthermore, COMET will develop strong mechanisms for knowledge exchange, dissemination and training to enhance and maintain European capacity, competence and skills in radioecology. The COMET consortium has 13 partners, expanding from the organisations within the FP7 STAR project. In particular, COMET partners from countries which have experienced major nuclear accidents (i.e. Ukraine and Japan) and/or who hold Observatory sites.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SiS-2009-1.2.1.1;SiS-2009-1.3.2.1 | Award Amount: 3.09M | Year: 2010

PERARES strengthens public engagement in research (PER) by developing multi-annual action plans, involving researchers and Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) in the formulation of research agendas and the research process. It uses debates on science to actively articulate research requests of civil society. These are forwarded to research institutes, and results are used in a next phase of the debate. Thus, these debates move upstream into agenda setting. For this, partners link existing debate formats with the science shop network already linking civil society and research institutes - and start a transnational web portal for debates. This is piloted on nanotechnology, then every few months a new debate starts. These are connected to the European reflection on the grand societal challenges for the future of the ERA. To be able to answer to research requests, it is necessary to enlarge and strengthen the network of research bodies doing research for/with CSOs. Thus, nine new science shop like facilities throughout Europe are started, mentored by experienced partners. Science shop-like work is advanced by adding studies on good practices to the available knowledge base and organising workshops. Guidelines to evaluate the impact of engagement activities are developed and tested. The partners pilot and assess alternative forms of agenda-setting dialogue between researchers and CSOs, e.g. long-term periodic meetings, and direct co-operations in two important social sciences fields: Roma/Travellers issues and domestic violence issues. The partners also investigate the potential role of higher education institutes and funding councils in supporting co-operation with CSOs. PERARES discusses its activities with the wider community through two large conferences and ongoing dissemination. Thus, through increased, better structured co-operation, more researchers and CSOs engage in incorporating needs, concerns and knowledge of civil society in research agendas.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.87M | Year: 2015

This European Training Network aims to produce the next generation of early stage researchers who will enable Europe to take a leading role in the development of future devices, systems and networks supporting the 5G high-speed wireless internet. To do this, researchers must be able to work in interdisciplinary teams, integrate their activities, share expertise, and promote a vision of a converged wireless and optical devices and networks that efficiently supports the services and applications being demanded. A large number of technologies and devices will need to converge, co-exist and interoperate, and most importantly, cooperate, if this vision is to be efficiently and cost-effectively realised. A key area within this next generation jigsaw is the integration of optical fibre networks and radio networks at mm-wave frequencies, to provide high-bandwidth front/backhaul services and enable scalable and manageable networks without a highly complex interface structure and multiple overlaid protocols. FIWIN5G aims to provide doctoral students with the exposure to the range of skills, necessary to address these challenging demands. Deep technical knowledge but also key transferable skills common in entrepreneurship, management, financing as well as communication, and societal outreach. While becoming expects in one particular sub-domain, they must understand the broad context of their work, whether it is systems/network engineers understanding the devices and technologies that make up the networks or device engineers understanding the networks in which their devices will function. We draw together a range of world-leading partners, selected for their complimentary and excellence to offer a vital opportunity to advance industrys understanding and uptake of the key technologies in this area. To provide excellent training and diverse experience of research environments, all project involve a significant period of secondment and collaboration with an industry partner.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Eaton introduces eVaptive electronic fuel tank venting system; reduced cost, complexity | Main | GKN Driveline develops new lightweight propshaft for Audi Q5; more compact, lighter, more efficient; MLB Evo » ABB has commissioned Denmark’s first urban energy storage system. The Lithium-ion based battery energy storage system (BESS) will be integrated with the local electricity grid in the new harbor district of Nordhavn, Copenhagen. The system has been commissioned for Radius, DONG Energy’s electrical grid division. The 630kW/460 kWh Battery Energy Storage System connected to main grid is capable of supplying electricity to 60 households for 24 hours. The battery storage solution will account for a significant part of the energy system, in which solar and wind energy will provide the majority of electricity production. Since renewable energy production is less predictable, the storage system will be a key element of energy supply. ABB’s flexible and modular system can be used for different functionalities such as peak load shaving and frequency response. The battery energy storage system is part of the “EnergyLab Nordhavn” project implemented in the Nordhavn district of Copenhagen. The project aims to develop and demonstrate energy solutions of the future. This includes providing valuable knowledge to help realize a more flexible and sustainable electricity grid with large amounts of renewable energy. These solutions are crucial for reaching the ambitious goal of turning Copenhagen into the world’s first carbon neutral capital in 2025. “EnergyLab Nordhavn – new urban energy infrastructures” is a four-year project (2015-19) developing future energy solutions. It uses Nordhavn as an urban living laboratory and demonstrates how electricity, district heating, energy-efficient solutions and electrical transport can be combined into an intelligent, flexible and highly-optimised energy system. The project partners include The Technical University of Denmark, City of Copenhagen, By & Havn, HOFOR, Radius, ABB, Balslev, Danfoss, Clean Charge, METROTHERM, Glen Dimplex and the PowerLab facilities. Funding for the project is supported by the Danish Energy Agency.


Jimenez-Tuñon Brings Over 15 Years of Senior Telecom Industry Leadership and Operational Expertise with a Focus on Supporting the Acceleration of Pareteum Global Sales Program NEW YORK, Feb. 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Pareteum Corporation (NYSE MKT: TEUM) ("Pareteum" or the "Company"), a leading international provider of mobile networking software and services, today announced that its Nomination Committee has appointed Mr. Luis Jimenez-Tuñon to the Board of Directors effective March, 1, 2017. Mr. Jimenez-Tuñon is a distinguished mobile telecommunications industry leader, having served as CEO of Pareteum's largest customer, Vodafone Enabler Spain S.L. ("Vodafone Enabler") from July 2011 to December 2016. In addition to his role at Vodafone Enabler, during a decade at Vodafone, Mr. Jimenez-Tuñon has also held leadership positions at Vodafone Spain where he was responsible for business development and strategy of the group's Mobile Virtual Network Operators (MVNOs), enablers, roaming services, international carriers and wholesale fixed broadband business lines. "There can be no doubt that Luis is an accomplished industry leader and executive who brings with him invaluable insights, expertise and a global network of relationships that will contribute greatly to our corporate growth plans. We are especially honored that Luis, an early advocate of our platform business and over the past 5 years, one of our most valued partners within Vodafone, has agreed to join us and help build what we believe will be one of the preeminent mobile services and messaging companies in the world," said Hal Turner, Executive Chairman of Pareteum. "I am excited to be joining Pareteum Board of Directors, having witnessed first-hand the disruptive and transformational impact the Company's technology can have on mobile communications as evidenced by its central role in enabling multiple MNVOs such as Lebara and the launch of Lowi, Vodafone's digital low-cost mobile brand, which continues to earn industry accolades. I look forward to helping the team capitalize on the momentum building behind the Company's mobility cloud platform and its support for the Internet of Things and advanced messaging applications and I have confidence that Hal and his team are building a company that is well positioned to capitalize on the vast potential ahead of it," added Mr. Jimenez-Tuñon. Mr. Jimenez-Tuñon is currently founder and CEO of Red Queen Ventures, S.L. (www.redqueen-ventures.com) a global high-tech advisory and Investment Company focused on technology, telecom, MVNO/E, satellite and aerospace. As Chief Executive of Vodafone Enabler, he pioneered the Company's innovative business model and powered the launch of Vodafone Spain's second brand Lowi.es which was awarded best Spanish MVNO in 2015 and 2016. Started in 2011, under his leadership, Vodafone enabler boosted its revenue, profit and operational performance, and achieved internationalization. Previously, Luis held several executive positions at Vodafone Spain, including Senior Vice President where he grew business to hundreds of millions of euros in yearly revenue. Luis began his career in the satellite industry in 2002 holding various positions including Research engineer at the National Space Institute of Denmark and later Deputy Commercial Director of INSA (today ISDEFE), Spain's leading satellite operations company managing NASA and ESA tracking stations. Luis has received several professional and academic awards at international and national levels. Luis earned an Executive MBA from EOI Business School, a Master's Degree in Satellite Communications from Polytechnic University of Madrid, and an MSc in Telecommunications Engineering from the University of Zaragoza in cooperation with the Technical University of Denmark. He also completed the Executive Management Program (SEP) from the Graduate School of business at Stanford University in California, of which he is lifetime alumni. Along with his executive career, Luis has been guest speaker at international business summits and has published several papers. About Pareteum Corporation: Pareteum Corporation and its subsidiaries provide a complete mobility cloud platform, utilizing messaging and security capabilities for the global Mobile, MVNO, Enterprise, Saas and IoT markets. Mobile Network Operator (MNO) customers include Vodafone, the world's second largest mobile operator by customer count, Zain, the 4th largest mobile operator in the world in terms of geographical presence and other Tier 1 operators, MVNO customers such as Lebara and Lowi, and partners including Cleartech and Expeto. For more information please visit: www.pareteum.com. Forward-Looking Statements: Certain statements contained herein constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements may include, without limitation, statements with respect to Pareteum's plans and objectives, projections, expectations and intentions. These forward-looking statements are based on current expectations, estimates and projections about Pareteum's industry, management's beliefs and certain assumptions made by management. Readers are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Because such statements involve risks and uncertainties, the actual results and performance of Pareteum may differ materially from the results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Given these uncertainties, readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements. Unless otherwise required by law, Pareteum also disclaims any obligation to update its view of any such risks or uncertainties or to announce publicly the result of any revisions to the forward-looking statements made here. Additional information concerning certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected or suggested in Pareteum's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, copies of which are available from the SEC or may be obtained upon request from Pareteum Corporation.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Management change in William Demant Holding A/S Søren Nielsen new President & CEO Niels B. Christiansen new Chairman of the Board President & CEO Niels Jacobsen has decided to step down after 25 years as member of the Executive Board in William Demant Holding to become CEO of William Demant Invest A/S. The present Chief Operating Officer (COO) Søren Nielsen will become new President & CEO of William Demant Holding. The management changes will take effect on 1 April 2017. Going forward, the Executive Board will consist of Søren Nielsen and CFO René Schneider backed by a management group consisting of Arne Boye Nielsen (Diagnostics), Niels Wagner (Retail) and Svend Thomsen (Finance). In addition, the Oticon Foundation will announce a number of other management and board changes in the William Demant Group. On the promotion of Søren Nielsen, the present Chairman of the Board of William Demant Holding, Lars Nørby Johansen, says: "With Søren Nielsen as President & CEO, the Company gets a strong leader who will safeguard William Demant Holding's continued competitiveness in a dynamic industry. He stands for both readiness to change and continuity and has the ability to carry on the strategy to ensure that the Company continues its growth. With his insight into the industry gained over the past many years, his ability to discover new ways and many commercial successes on his resume, Søren Nielsen is the right person to manage William Demant Holding, where he is already very well-respected as a leader." Søren Nielsen, who will also continue as President of the subsidiary Oticon, comments on his new role in William Demant Holding: "I'm proud and honoured to have been given the opportunity to be at the head of a fantastic company, which year after year delivers great results - not least in 2016. We are standing on a very strong platform, ready to take on the competition and be part of the fast development in our industry and together with our customers deliver the most innovative and well-functioning products to the end-users." Søren Nielsen takes over from Niels Jacobsen, who will assume the position as CEO of William Demant Invest, which is the company from which the Oticon Foundation's business activities arise. In addition, Niels Jacobsen has been nominated as member of the Board of William Demant Holding. The Board intends to elect him Deputy Chairman. In a comment on Niels Jacobsen's 25 years with the Company, Lars Nørby Johansen says: "With his business acumen, Niels Jacobsen has focused on each company in William Demant Holding being able to act optimally in the ongoing transformation of the Company, and results show that he has been very successful indeed." On the proposal of Niels B. Christiansen as new Chairman of the Board of William Demant Holding, Lars Nørby Johansen says: "In Niels B. Christiansen, the Company gets a Chairman who is rightly recognised for his business competencies. As an independent member of the Board, he brings an external and innovative perspective to the table, which will support the Company's future growth." Changes to the Board of Directors As a result of the above changes, Chairman of the Board in William Demant Holding, Lars Nørby Johansen, will not stand for re-election at the coming annual general meeting. Lars Nørby Johansen will, however, continue his work in the William Demant Group, as the board of the Oticon Foundation has nominated him for the position of chairman of the board of the Oticon Foundation, where he will succeed Niels Boserup, who wants to step down after more than 10 years as chairman of the Oticon Foundation. As a consequence of the changes mentioned above, the Board of Directors of William Demant Holding is after the annual general meeting on 27 March expected to elect the present Board member Niels B. Christiansen new Chairman and Niels Jacobsen new Deputy Chairman. The board of the Oticon Foundation supports these proposals. The other Board members, Peter Foss, Benedikte Leroy and Lars Rasmussen, all accept renomination and are expected to be re-elected. This company announcement is accompanied by a press release from the Oticon Foundation with detailed information on the coming changes to management and board. Please find below biographies and CVs for Søren Nielsen and Niels B. Christiansen. Biographies and CVs for Niels Jacobsen and Lars Nørby Johansen appear from the enclosed press release. Søren Nielsen will take another step up the corporate ladder when he becomes President & CEO of William Demant Holding. In 2015, he was appointed COO of William Demant Holding, and he has since 2008 been responsible for Oticon where he will continue as President. For the past eight years, Søren Nielsen has been overall responsible for the whole hearing aid business, and he has had a decisive say in important strategic decisions and acquisitions for the whole Group, most recently also as a member of the Executive Board since September 2015. Søren Nielsen will continue the William Demant Group's hearing healthcare strategy, which he also helped define: To grow in all areas of hearing healthcare, including hearing aids, hearing implants and diagnostics, and to exploit the Group's infrastructure and know-how with a view to developing the Group's position as market leader. In the Group, Søren Nielsen is regarded as a hard-working, energetic man, who knows both the customers and the employees well. He is seen as a very committed leader and an adept communicator. He is detail-oriented and knows what goes on both internally and externally. Søren Nielsen will continue to prioritise the development of the Group's culture and employees, while focusing on the customers and using technology and innovation as important tools for driving the business forward. Highly concerned with the exploitation of synergies across all business activities in William Demant Holding, Søren Nielsen uses every opportunity to emphasise the importance of the further development of the Group's global distribution and shared services. It is a man who knows the Group better than almost anybody else that will take the reins. The newly appointed President & CEO is 46 years old and has been with the Company for almost half his life. Already when Søren Nielsen studied to become a Master of Science in Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark, he used Oticon as a case in his thesis work, and right after his graduation, he was employed with the Company. That was back in 1995. In the coming years, he got to know the Group from all angles imaginable in William Demant Holding's subsidiaries all over the world, before he returned to the "mother ship" in Denmark where he became an important part of Oticon's management. Up through the 2000s, Søren Nielsen took part in ensuring a string of important commercial successes, including Oticon Delta that changed the way in which we design hearing aids. In 2016, he was behind the launch of the game changer Oticon Opn, which is an Internet-connected hearing aid that opens up the sound picture and enables the user to participate actively in complex listening situations. Søren Nielsen is married to Henriette, who is a doctor. The couple has three children. Born 1970 1995-2008     A number of management positions in Oticon in such areas as quality manager, development and sales 2008-              President, Oticon A/S 2015-              COO & Deputy CEO, William Demant Holding A/S Board member in Sennheiser Communications A/S Member of the Confederation of Danish Industry's committee on health policy Master of Science in Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) Niels B. Christiansen is one of Denmark's most recognised top executives. Since 2008, he has run Denmark's largest industrial company Danfoss, and he has done really well. Even though he took over the reins at a time when the world economy was in crisis, Niels B. Christiansen succeeded in steering the renowned company towards new growth. He grew up in a small town outside Aabenraa where he loved to tinker with mopeds and all kinds of technical devices, among these the computer he bought with his savings when he was in the ninth grade in 1981. Back then, an ordinary computer - with very limited capacity - cost the same as a small family car. The dream was however to become a fighter pilot, but with his height of 195 cm, Niels B. Christiansen was too tall. Instead, he became an engineer and graduated from the Technical University of Denmark with a grade point average of 12.2 according to the old grading scale where 13 was the highest grade. Having completed an MBA in France, where he was number one in his year group, the trained engineer began his professional career as a consultant with McKinsey & Co. Then he moved on to become head of corporate development with the power drill manufacturer Hilti in Switzerland, and at the age of 31, he became managing director of GN Netcom in 1997. In 2004, Niels B. Christiansen was "called home" to Southern Jutland by Danfoss where he did such a convincing job that Jørgen Mads Clausen appointed him his successor as President & CEO in 2008. All through his busy life as an executive, he has given high priority to spending time and travelling with his wife Lene, whom he met in high school, and their two now almost grown-up children. Born 1966 1991                Consultant, McKinsey & Co 1995                Vice President and head of corporate development, Hilti S.A. 1997                Vice President, GN Netcom A/S 2000                President & CEO, GN Netcom A/S 2003                Executive Vice President and CEO, GN Store Nord A/S 2004                Executive Vice President and CEO, Danfoss A/S 2004                Chief Operating Officer, Danfoss A/S 2007                Deputy CEO, Danfoss A/S 2008                President & CEO, Danfoss A/S Chairman of the board of Axcel Board member in A.P. Møller - Mærsk A/S Board member in William Demant Holding A/S Board member in Technical University of Denmark (DTU) 1991                Master of Science in Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) 1993                MBA, INSEAD in France


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.2-12 | Award Amount: 3.93M | Year: 2012

The genetic changes associated with domestication in aquaculture pose an increasing threat to the integrity of native fish gene pools. Consequently, there is a bourgeoning need for the development of molecular tools to assess and monitor the genetic impact of escaped or released farmed fish. In addition, exploration of basic links between genetic differences among farmed and wild fish and differences in important life-history traits with fitness consequences are crucial prerequisites for designing biologically informed management strategies. The project AquaTrace will establish an overview of current knowledge on aquaculture breeding, genomic resources and previous research projects for the marine species seabass, seabream and turbot. The project will apply cutting-edge genomic methods for the development of high-powered, cost-efficient, forensically validated and transferable DNA based tools for identifying and tracing the impact of farmed fish in the wild. Controlled experiments with wild and farmed fish and their hybrids will be conducted with salmon and brown trout as model organisms using advanced common garden facilities. These experiments will elucidate the fundamental consequences of introgression by pinpointing and assessing the effects on fitness of specific genomic regions. Generated insights will form the basis of a risk assessment and management recommendations including suggestions for mitigation and associated costs. This information and the developed molecular tools will be available as open-access support to project participants and external stakeholders including the aquaculture industry. The project is expected to facilitate technology transfer to the aquaculture sector by promoting better tailored breeding practices and traceability throughout production chain. Overall this initiative will support the development of sustainable European aquaculture and provide Good Environmental Status in line with the Marine Strategy Framework Directive.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2013-1.2.1 | Award Amount: 85.21M | Year: 2013

This proposal details activities that will ensure the continued enhancement and ongoing operation of the leading-edge GANT network, supporting a range of network and added-value services, targeted at users across the GANT service area.\nIn the area of multi-domain network service operation, GN3plus plans to deliver fast, efficient provisioning of advanced services, develop operational support across management domains, and improve security to ensure service integrity and protect network resources. These initiatives will be complemented by the development of application services in a federated environment such as mobile and wireless roaming supported by safe and secure Authentication and Authorisation Infrastructure.\nNetworking Activities will provide management and support for all GN3plus activities through communication, promotion, international liaison and business development. Emphasis will be placed on supporting and encouraging service take-up among users by working closely with NRENs. GANT will increase digital inclusion through closer collaboration between NRENs, exchange of staff and specialist expertise, as well as by seeking synergies between public administrations and the GN3plus partners using their vast, shared knowledge base.\nJoint Research Activities will be targeted at providing critical analyses of future network and application technologies, with a view to future deployment of emerging technologies within and outside the GANT community.\nThe governance model aims to increase effectiveness and user influence. The GN3plus Partners Assembly will deal with overall policy and an Executive Board will oversee its implementation. An International User Advisory Committee and External Advisory Committee will ensure users views and senior industry and service provider expertise are channelled directly to the Assembly. Specialised Advisory Boards will ensure highly efficient decision making, and that the voice of the stakeholder community is heard.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: SC5-05a-2014 | Award Amount: 2.07M | Year: 2015

The CARISMA project has two overall objectives. First, through effective stakeholder consultation and communication leading to improved coordination and assessment of climate change mitigation options, it aims to benefit research and innovation efficiency as well as international cooperation on research and innovation and technology transfer. Second, it seeks to assess policy and governance questions that shape the prospects of climate change mitigation options, and discuss the results with representatives from the CARISMA target audiences to incorporate what can be learned for the benefit of climate change mitigation. The experienced, interdisciplinary and diverse CARISMA consortium has an extensive track record of collaborating in Framework Programme projects. It combines capacity for technological, environmental, economic and social assessment with deep expertise across a range of climate change mitigation options, encompassing mature and emerging technologies as well as practices and governance, which are increasingly identified as important areas to achieve deep greenhouse gas emission reductions. Communication with, and support to, the CARISMA target audiences are an integral part of the project. In all inventory and assessment activities envisaged in the project, interaction with stakeholders is a key part. To facilitate coordination and avoid overlap, these activities are overseen by a dedicated work package. The target audiences include national and local policymakers, innovation and strategy managers in business and industry, research funding organisations and the research community. The CARISMA project will result in online platform services, face-to-face interactions, policy briefs and publications and increased capacity in the EU, Accession Countries and beyond, to address the climate change challenge and move towards a green, innovative and thriving global economy.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.3.3-02 | Award Amount: 7.77M | Year: 2011

The objective of KYROBIO project is to broaden the toolbox of single enantiomer chiral chemicals that are produced by industry in Europe using biotechnological routes. The main target is applications of lyase enzymes to selectively synthesize molecules with multiple chiral centres applying enzymatic carbon-carbon and carbon-nitrogen bond formation as the key technical platforms. We will then apply synthetic biology to improve fermentation processes in order to generate better enzymes. Chiral compounds are an important class of chemicals that biocatalytic transformation has already demonstrated great potential to compete with chemocatalysts in their production with associated benefits that come from reductions in use of organic solvents, toxic metals and energy but application has been relatively limited. KYROBIO will address the main challenges with moving forward to the next generation of added value industrial applications of white biotechnology for high value chemical synthesis. Using a supradisciplinary approach ranging from enzyme development, chemistry, molecular biology, fermentation and innovative isolation techniques the bottlenecks to applying this new technology will be overcome. It is expected that promising candidate chemicals will be commercialised within three years of completion and so scale up with economic and feasibility studies that are also key technology developments. The consortium includes a strong presence of SMEs including SME leadership and also a large multinational company which ensures multiple routes to market for the outcomes of this project. We will also have economic and life cycle analysis coupled with significant dissemination plans to ensure wider understanding of this technology that will lead to increased acceptance and uptake. The use of this environmentally beneficial technology will help to keep the European chemicals industry at the forefront of white biotechnology and increase opportunities in economic and employment.


News Article | February 13, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Andreas Mogensen has captured for the first time a clear recording of blue jets while aboard the International Space Station. Blue jets are lightning phenomena that shoot up into space rather than to the ground. Scientists still do not know a lot about them, what they’re effects are to Earth’s atmosphere, or what conditions make them possible. The colored video of the blue jets and sprites were captured while ISS was cruising at around 17,896 miles per hour (28,800 km/hr) 250 miles over the Bay of Bengal. The fascinating electrical discharges were observed to be about 0.62-mile (1-km) wide and around 11 miles (18 km) in altitude. Mogensen also spotted a pulsating blue jet that reached about 25 miles (40 km). The altitude of the ISS provided a good vantage point to achieve such feat. You can watch the video of the blue jets captured from the ISS below: Didn’t see it? We have created a GIF for you Pilots have reported seeing them but these gigantic electrical discharges occurring in the upper atmosphere are very difficult to study. Capturing a good photograph or video of these events is very difficult. Recording them from the ground is next to impossible while satellites do not have the best viewing angle to snap a recording. The very first scientific report of a red sprite was only recorded in 1990. “It is not every day that you get to capture a new weather phenomenon on film, so I am very pleased with the result - but even more so that researchers will be able to investigate these intriguing thunderstorms in more detail soon,” said Mogensen. The Danish astronaut was tasked to spend 10 days on the ISS back in September 2015 to test a new thunder cloud imaging system as part of the Thor Experiment, a project by the Technical University of Denmark named after the god of thunder in Nordic mythology. For the curious, Mogensen used a Nikon D4 camera 6,400 ISO recorded the lightning phenomenon at 24 frames per second at 1,920 x 1,080 pixels. The researchers have published the results of the study in Geophysical Research Letters where you can find details of the camera setup and observations of the experts. Upon analysis, the Danish astronaut was able to record 245 blue flashes or about 90 per minute. Below is a video of Mogensen explaining red sprites and blue jets phenomena: © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

This project is the second in the series of EC-financed parts of the Graphene Flagship. The Graphene Flagship is a 10 year research and innovation endeavour with a total project cost of 1,000,000,000 euros, funded jointly by the European Commission and member states and associated countries. The first part of the Flagship was a 30-month Collaborative Project, Coordination and Support Action (CP-CSA) under the 7th framework program (2013-2016), while this and the following parts are implemented as Core Projects under the Horizon 2020 framework. The mission of the Graphene Flagship is to take graphene and related layered materials from a state of raw potential to a point where they can revolutionise multiple industries. This will bring a new dimension to future technology a faster, thinner, stronger, flexible, and broadband revolution. Our program will put Europe firmly at the heart of the process, with a manifold return on the EU investment, both in terms of technological innovation and economic growth. To realise this vision, we have brought together a larger European consortium with about 150 partners in 23 countries. The partners represent academia, research institutes and industries, which work closely together in 15 technical work packages and five supporting work packages covering the entire value chain from materials to components and systems. As time progresses, the centre of gravity of the Flagship moves towards applications, which is reflected in the increasing importance of the higher - system - levels of the value chain. In this first core project the main focus is on components and initial system level tasks. The first core project is divided into 4 divisions, which in turn comprise 3 to 5 work packages on related topics. A fifth, external division acts as a link to the parts of the Flagship that are funded by the member states and associated countries, or by other funding sources. This creates a collaborative framework for the entire Flagship.


In the frame of previous FP6 and FP7 projects with involvement of IZADI-NANO2INDUSTRY consortium members nanotechnologies have demonstrated their effectiveness for enhancing materials and manufacturing processes performance up to a certain level tested in intended environment (TRL 5). Different nanotechnology based strategies have been addressed to develop methods to improve thermoplastics and metallic parts using current industrial manufacturing processes. Three strategies appear promising to be further implemented in real component manufacturing production plants: master-batches for thermoplastics, master-pellets for metals and nanostructured powders for metallic coatings. IZADI-NANO2INDUSTRY project proposes different solutions based on KETs such as nanotechnology, advanced materials and advanced manufacturing. The project aims to implement the master-batches, the master-pellets and the nanostructured powders in three innovative PILOTS, developed and installed at three existing production plants that will effectively manufacture real components (B-pillar, Swash plate and Valve plate) integrating safe-by-design approaches into the developments stages. The project follows to develop inherently safer production methods. IZADI-NANO2INDUSTRY is an industry driven project with up to 44% of the budget devoted to SMEs. It proposes solutions that will generate new market opportunities for European Automotive, Construction and Agricultural Machinery sectors offering to OEMs new added-value products. IZADI-NANO2INDUSTRY project is supported by the government of the regions where the PILOTS will be installed. The project addresses an innovation action that is in line with the Basque Country, Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna regions RIS-3 Smart Specialization Strategy.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-ARTEMIS | Phase: SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2009-1 | Award Amount: 24.36M | Year: 2010

The proposed RECOMP (Reduced certification cost for trusted multi-core platforms) research project will establish methods, tools and platforms for enabling cost-efficient certification and re-certification of safety-critical systems and mixed-criticality systems, i.e. systems containing safety-critical and non-safety-critical components. RECOMP recognizes the fact that the increasing processing power of embedded systems is mainly provided by increasing the number of processing cores. The increased numbers of cores is commonly regarded as a design challenge in the safety-critical area, as there are no established approaches to achieve certification. At the same time there is an increased need for flexibility in the products in the safety-critical market. This need for flexibility puts new requirements on the customization and the upgradability of both the non-safety and safety-critical critical part. The difficulty with this is the large cost in both effort and money of the re-certification of the modified software, which means that companies cannot fully leverage the advantages of modular software system. RECOMP will provide reference designs and platform architectures together with the required design methods and tools for achieving cost-effective certification and re-certification of mixed-criticality, component based, multi-core systems. The aim of RECOMP is to define a European standard reference technology for mixed-criticality multi-core systems supported by the European tool vendors participating in RECOMP. The RECOMP project will bring clear benefits in terms of cross-domain implementations of mixed-criticality systems in all domains addressed by project participants: automotive systems, aerospace systems, industrial control systems, lifts and transportation systems. RECOMP will thus provide solutions that will allow European industry to increase its market share in the growing market of mixed-criticality systems.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2010.7.1-1 | Award Amount: 20.64M | Year: 2011

The key objective of the EcoGrid EU project is to demonstrate efficient operation of a distribution power system with high penetration of many and variable renewable energy resources. The demonstration will take place on the Danish island Bornholm with more than 50 % of electricity consumption from renewable energy production. A real-time market concept will be developed to give small end-users of electricity and distributed renewable energy sources new options (and potential economic benefits) for offering TSOs additional balancing and ancillary services. Strong industrial participation and innovative experiences from related European and US Smart Grids RD&D project will contribute to the development and implementation of robust ICT platforms and information architectures. This is the key to allow all distributed energy resources to participate actively in the real-time power market. Of a total of 28 000 customers on Bornholm, at least 2600 residential consumers will participate with flexible demand response to real-time price signals. The participants will be equipped with residential demand response devices/appliances using gateways and smart controllers. Installation of the smart solutions will allow real-time prices to be presented to consumers and allow users to pre-program their automatic demand-response preferences, e.g. through different types of electricity price contracts. Automation and customer choice is one of the key elements in the EcoGrid EU concept. To make the EcoGrid EU solutions more widely applicable, the market concept will be designed for existing power exchange(s) and power regulation market(s). Because of the test site location on Bornholm, the real-time market concept will first be operational in the Nordic power market system. EcoGrid EU replication activities will ensure that the concept (or part of the solutions) can be adjusted and prepared for implementation in other power systems and regulatory conditions across Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.22 | Award Amount: 11.58M | Year: 2011

The objective of the SOPHIA project is to strenghten and optimise research capabilities, mainly by coordinating efforts on important but precompetitive issues. Large research infrastructures working together will avoid the useless replication of a large number of small efforts. The SOPHIA project aims at pulling together the main European photovoltaic research infrastructures in order to provide the scientific community with common referential to conduct efficient and coordinated research work in the field of PV technologies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-3-2015 | Award Amount: 19.05M | Year: 2015

The life sciences are undergoing a transformation. Modern experimental tools study the molecules, reactions, and organisation of life in unprecedented detail. The precipitous drop in costs for high-throughput biology has enabled European research laboratories to produce an ever-increasing amount of data. Life scientists are rapidly generating the most complex and heterogeneous datasets that science can currently imagine, with unprecedented volumes of biological data to manage. Data will only generate long-term value if it is Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Re-usable (FAIR). This requires a scalable infrastructure that connects local, national and European efforts and provides standards, tools and training for data stewardship. Formally established as a legal entity in January 2014, ELIXIR - the European life science Infrastructure for Biological Information - is a distributed organisation comprising national bioinformatics research infrastructures and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). This coordinated infrastructure includes data standards, exchange, interoperability, storage, security and training. Recognising the importance of a data foundation for European life sciences, the ESFRI and European Council named ELIXIR as one of Europes priority Research Infrastructures. In response ELIXIR have developed ELIXIR-EXCELERATE. The project will fast-track ELIXIRs early implementation phase by i) coordinate and enhance existing resources into a world-leading data service for academia and industry, ii) grow bioinformatics capacity and competence across Europe, and iii) complete the management processes needed for a large distributed infrastructure. ELIXIR-EXCELERATE will deliver a step-change in the life sciences. It will enable cost-effective and sustainable management and re-use of data for millions of users across the globe and improve the competitiveness of European life science industries through accessible data and robust standards and tools.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ECSEL-IA | Phase: ECSEL-17-2015 | Award Amount: 64.82M | Year: 2016

ENABLE-S3 will pave the way for accelerated application of highly automated and autonomous systems in the mobility domains automotive, aerospace, rail and maritime as well as in the health care domain. Virtual testing, verification and coverage-oriented test selection methods will enable validation with reasonable efforts. The resulting validation framework will ensure Europeans Industry competitiveness in the global race of automated systems with an expected market potential of 60B in 2025. Project results will be used to propose standardized validation procedures for highly automated systems (ACPS). The technical objectives addressed are: 1. Provision of a test and validation framework that proves the functionality, safety and security of ACPS with at least 50% less test effort than required in classical testing. 2. Promotion of a new technique for testing of automated systems with physical sensor signal stimuli generators, which will be demonstrated for at least 3 physical stimuli generators. 3. Raising significantly the level of dependability of automated systems due to provision of a holistic test and validation platform and systematic coverage measures, which will reduce the probability of malfunction behavior of automated systems to 10E-9/h. 4. Provision of a validation environment for rapid re-qualification, which will allow reuse of validation scenarios in at least 3 development stages. 5. Establish open standards to speed up the adoption of the new validation tools and methods for ACPS. 6. Enabling safe, secure and functional ACPS across domains. 7. Creation of an eco-system for the validation and verification of automated systems in the European industry. ENABLE-S3 is strongly industry-driven. Realistic and relevant industrial use-cases from smart mobility and smart health will define the requirements to be addressed and assess the benefits of the technological progress.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA | Phase: ENERGY.2013.10.1.5 | Award Amount: 13.28M | Year: 2014

Europe has invoked the SET-Plan to design and implement an energy technology policy for Europe to accelerate the development and deployment of cost-effective renewable energy systems, including photovoltaics. With lower cost of solar electricity, PV could significantly contribute to the achievements of the 20-20-20 objectives. The Joint Program on PV of the European Energy Research Alliance (EERA-PV) aims to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of PV R&D through alignment and joint programming of R&D of its member institutes, and to contribute to the R&D-needs of the Solar Europe Industry Initiative. In CHEETAH, all EERA-PV members will, through collaborative R&D activities, (1) focus on solving specific bottlenecks in the R&D Joint Program of EERA-PV, (2) strengthen the collaboration between PV R&D performers in Europe through sharing of knowledge, personnel and facilities, and (3) accelerate the implementation of developed technologies in the European PV industry. Specifically, CHEETAH R&D will support Pillar A (performance enhancement & energy cost reduction) of the SEII Implementation Plan, through materials optimization and performance enhancement. CHEETAHs objectives are threefold: 1) Developing new concepts and technologies for wafer-based crystalline silicon PV (modules with ultra-thin cells), thin-film PV (advanced light management) and organic PV (very low-cost barriers), resulting in (strongly) reduced cost of materials and increased module performance; 2) Fostering long-term European cooperation in the PV R&D sector, by organizing workshops, training of researchers, efficient use of infrastructures; 3) Accelerating the implementation of innovative technologies in the PV industry, by a strong involvement of EPIA and EIT-KIC InnoEnergy in the program It is the ambition of CHEETAH to develop technology and foster manufacturing capabilities so that Europe can regain and build up own manufacturing capacity in all parts of the value chain in due time.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.7.2.3 | Award Amount: 62.80M | Year: 2014

A group of eight Transmission System Operators with a generator company, manufacturers and research organisations, propose 5 demonstration projects to remove, in 4 years, several barriers which prevent large-scale penetration of renewable electricity production in the European transmission network. The full scale demonstrations led by industry aim at proving the benefits of novel technologies coupled with innovative system integration approaches: - A scaled down model of generators connected to a HVDC link is used within a new testing facility to validate novel control strategies to improve the interaction between HVDC links and wind turbine generators - The implementation of a full scale, hardware-in-the-loop test setup in collaboration with worldwide market leaders of HVDC-VSC technology explores the interactions of HVDC VSC multiterminal control systems to validate their interoperable operations - Strategies to upgrade existing HVDC interconnectors are validated with the help of innovative components, architecture and system integration performances, to ensure higher RES penetration and more efficient cross border exchanges. - Full scale experiments and pilot projects at real life scale of both installation and operation of AC overhead line repowering technologies are carried out to show how existing corridors can see their existing capacity increase within affordable investments. - The technical feasibility of integrating DC superconducting links within an AC meshed network (using MgB2 as the critical material) will be tested at prototype scale, thus proving that significant performance improvements have been reached to enable commercialization before 2030 The experimental results will be integrated into European impact analyses to show the scalability of the solutions: routes for replication will be provided with benefits for the pan European transmission network and the European electricity market as soon as 2018, in line with the SET plan objectives


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-ARTEMIS | Phase: SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2012-ASP3;SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2012-ASP5 | Award Amount: 15.14M | Year: 2013

Vision systems are becoming ubiquitous in our daily lives. Complex analysis of images from multiple cameras will become the norm in the future, from cars to industrial systems, from smart cities to facility monitoring, aimed at extracting meaningful, context-dependent information. Todays market is dominated by a combination of relatively simple, fixed function, configurable cameras that stream video to PC-based (and in some cases small embedded) gateways. These systems cannot scale beyond a certain size because of power consumption and the aggregate networking bandwidth required to stream videos to servers, where aggregated video analysis is performed. So the trend for visual analytics functions is that they get executed at the edge of these complex vision systems, e.g. in the cameras themselves. The Cognitive and Perceptive Camera Systems (COPCAMS) proposal leverages recent advances in embedded computing platforms to design, prototype and field-test full large-scale vision systems. It aims at exploiting a new many-core programmable accelerator platform to power a new generation of vision related devices (smart cameras and gateways), able to extract relevant information from captured images and autonomously react to the sensed environment by interoperating at large scale in a distributed manner. Date of approval by ARTEMIS JU: 7/04/2015.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2011-1.2.2. | Award Amount: 5.89M | Year: 2011

The ESPAS project will provide the e-Infrastructure necessary to support the access to observations, the modeling and prediction of the Near-Earth Space environment. This includes the plasma and energetic particle environments that surround our planet as well as the neutral atmosphere at altitudes above 60 km. These environments are an important target for future research in areas such as space weather and Sun-climate studies. The ESPAS interface will provide access to a diverse set of databases that have been developed for the needs of different users. Thus a primary goal is to facilitate user access to heterogeneous data from multiple providers, ranging from ground-based observations acquired with multiple instruments and techniques, to data from satellite experiments, using a mixture of in-situ and remotely sensed techniques. The results of searches will be delivered in a scientist-friendly manner based on existing standards and protocols. The infrastructure will also be used as a test-bed for development of methodologies and standards for validation of models of the near-Earth environment. This will lead to validated predictions of conditions in that environment, and thus promote the transfer of space environment science products into commercial and operational applications.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2007-3.1-3 | Award Amount: 19.08M | Year: 2008

iNTeg-Risk is a large-scale integrating project aimed at improving the management of emerging risks in the innovative industry. This will be achieved by building a new risk management paradigm for emerging risks, which is a set of principles supported by a common language, commonly agreed tools & methods and Key Performance Indicators integrated into a single framework. As main impact, it will reduce time-to-market for the lead market EU technologies and promote safety, security, environmental friendliness and social responsibility as a trade-mark of the advanced EU technologies. The project will improve early recognition and monitoring of emerging risks, seek to reduce accidents caused by them (estimated 75 B/year EU27) and decrease reaction times if major accidents involving emerging risks happen. iNTeg-risk will reach its goals by promoting a EU-wide cross-sectorial life-cycle-based integration across all major disciplines, methods and tools as well as through integration of all relevant stakeholders. The project will be initiated from an empirical basis of 17 individual emerging risk issues (Emerging Risk Representative industrial Applications), and generalize their solutions addressing new technologies, products/materials, production and policies. The solutions will be validated in a second application cycle, and the overall solution made available to stakeholders in the form of the iNTeg-Risk platform: a one-stop shop for EU solutions addressing emerging risks. It will feature issues of early recognition and monitoring of emerging risks, communication, governance, pre-standardization, education & training, dissemination, as well as new tools such as Safetypedia, Atlas of Emerging Risks, Reference Library... The project has a solid industry leadership and involves the leading EU R&D institutions. It is coordinated by the European Virtual Institute for Integrated Risk Management, the EEIG guaranteeing the sustainability of the results after the project.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CP-ARTEMIS | Phase: SP1-JTI-ARTEMIS-2013-AIPP5 | Award Amount: 93.92M | Year: 2014

Embedded systems are the key innovation driver to improve almost all mechatronic products with cheaper and even new functionalities. Furthermore, they strongly support todays information society as inter-system communication enabler. Consequently boundaries of application domains are alleviated and ad-hoc connections and interoperability play an increasing role. At the same time, multi-core and many-core computing platforms are becoming available on the market and provide a breakthrough for system (and application) integration. A major industrial challenge arises facing (cost) efficient integration of different applications with different levels of safety and security on a single computing platform in an open context. The objective of the EMC project (Embedded multi-core systems for mixed criticality applications in dynamic and changeable real-time environments) is to foster these changes through an innovative and sustainable service-oriented architecture approach for mixed criticality applications in dynamic and changeable real-time environments. The EMC2 project focuses on the industrialization of European research outcomes and builds on the results of previous ARTEMIS, European and National projects. It provides the paradigm shift to a new and sustainable system architecture which is suitable to handle open dynamic systems. EMC is part of the European Embedded Systems industry strategy to maintain its leading edge position by providing solutions for: . Dynamic Adaptability in Open Systems . Utilization of expensive system features only as Service-on-Demand in order to reduce the overall system cost. . Handling of mixed criticality applications under real-time conditions . Scalability and utmost flexibility . Full scale deployment and management of integrated tool chains, through the entire lifecycle Approved by ARTEMIS-JU on 12/12/2013 for EoN. Minor mistakes and typos corrected by the Coordinator, finally approved by ARTEMIS-JU on 24/01/2014. Amendment 1 changes approved by ECSEL-JU on 31/03/2015.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2009.2.9.1 | Award Amount: 12.76M | Year: 2010

MARINA is a European project dedicated to bringing offshore renewable energy applications closer to the market by creating new infrastructures for both offshore wind and ocean energy converters. It addresses the need for creating a cost-efficient technology development basis to kick-start growth of the nascent European marine renewable energy (MRE) industry in the deep offshore a major future global market. The project combines deep-water engineering experience from European oil & gas developments during the last 40 years, state-of-the-art concepts for offshore wind energy, and the most promising concepts in todays R&D pipeline on wave energy and other marine renewables. The MARINA project is designed to capitalise on the vast body of proven marine technological knowledge gained in one of the worlds most hostile off-shore operating environments: the Northern European seas. MARINA will bolt this practical technology skill set onto the research base of the emerging but still marginal EU MRE industry and ensure its continued world-leading role. The MARINA project is therefore of major strategic significance for Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.23 | Award Amount: 11.05M | Year: 2011

Offshore Renewable Conversion systems are mostly at the pre-commercial stage of development. They comprise wave energy and tidal stream converters as well as offshore wind turbines for electrical generation. These devices require research to be undertaken at a series of scales along the path to commercialization. Each technology type is currently at a different stage of development but each one also needs specific research infrastructures to facilitate and catalyze commercialization. The aim of this project is to coordinate research and development at all scales (small models through to prototype scales from Laboratory through to Open Sea tests) and to allow access for researchers and developers into facilities which are not available universally in Europe. The linking together of facilities at different scales together with the incorporation of test facilities for components such as power take-off systems, grid integration, moorings, environmental tests will ensure a focusing of activities in this area. MaRINET brings together an Infrastructure with 42 Facilities from 28 Partners spread across 11 EU countries and 1 ICPC, Brazil. It also brings together a network of expertise in the Offshore Marine Renewable Energy sector with experience at all scales of offshore technology research and development. MaRINET offers over 600 weeks of access to 300 projects and 800 external users. The majority (77%) of the MaRINET budget has been targeted in the areas most prioritized in the EC Call such as networking, training, dissemination and transnational access.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.2 | Award Amount: 6.74M | Year: 2009

DERRI has as its primary objective the further integration of the European Distributed Energy Re-sources research community through the provision of User Access to a unique portfolio of important European Laboratories in the field of Distributed Energy Resources, focusing mainly system and architectural aspects of smart energy network based on Distributed Generation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2007.2.2.1.4. | Award Amount: 8.58M | Year: 2008

MEECE is a scientific research project which aims to use a combination of data synthesis, numerical simulation and targeted experimentation to further our knowledge of how marine ecosystems will respond to combinations of multiple climate change and anthropogenic drivers. With an emphasis on the European Marine Strategy (EMS), MEECE will improve the decision support tools to provide a structured link between management questions and the knowledge base that can help to address those questions. A strong knowledge transfer element will provide an effective means of communication between end-users and scientists.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IRSES | Award Amount: 277.40K | Year: 2014

Quantum semiconductor microcavities are structures in which photons can be confined within an area whose size is comparable to the wavelength of light. In this scenario, light-matter interactions can be substantially enhanced. A traditional microcavity is composed of two dielectric or semiconductor Bragg reflectors confining an active area which contains a quantum object such as a quantum well. From the initial observation of strong coupling between photons and excitons in such microcavities, the physics of polaritons has developed very quickly demonstrating such fascinating effects as stimulated scattering and Bose-condensation of polariton; room-temperature polariton lasing, superfluidity, bistability and multistability, soliton formation and many others. Recently it w