Technical Consulting Services

Cheshire, United Kingdom

Technical Consulting Services

Cheshire, United Kingdom

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Greive K.A.,Ego Pharmaceuticals | Staton J.A.,Technical Consulting Services | Miller P.F.,University of Technology, Sydney | Peters B.A.,University of Technology, Sydney | Oppenheim V.M.J.,Ego Pharmaceuticals
Australian Journal of Entomology | Year: 2010

For many decades effective insect repellents have relied on synthetic actives such as N,N-diethyl-. meta-toluamide. Increasingly, consumers are seeking natural-based alternatives to many everyday products including insect repellents. While many studies have been published detailing the potential of essential oils to act as insect repellents, few oils have been identified as viable alternatives to synthetic actives. This study details the process involved in the selection of Australian essential oils effective as repellents and the subsequent testing of natural-based insect repellents using the selected oils. Using a combination of laboratory-based and field-based testing, oil from Melaleuca ericifolia was identified as being an effective insect repellent. When formulated into three different bases: an alcohol-based spray, an emulsion and a gel, these Melaleuca-based repellents were shown to be as effective at repelling mosquitoes Aedes vigilax (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae) and Verrallina carmenti (Edwards) (Diptera: Culicidae), the bush fly Musca vetustissima (Walker) (Diptera: Muscidae), and biting midges Culicoides ornatus (Taylor) (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) and Culicoides immaculatus (Lee & Reye) (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) as a synthetic-based commercial repellent. This study has shown that effective insect repellents based on natural active ingredients can deliver repellency on par with synthetic actives in the field. Three Melaleuca-based formulations have been registered as repellents and are now commercially available. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Australian Entomological Society.


Smart N.,Technical Consulting Services | Rance A.,Technical Consulting Services | Reddy B.,Technical Consulting Services | Lydmark S.,Microbial Analytics AB | And 2 more authors.
Corrosion Engineering Science and Technology | Year: 2011

To ensure the safe disposal of spent fuel in Sweden, SKB is planning to use the copper-iron canister in a granitic deep geological repository, surrounded by a compacted bentonite engineered barrier. In order to develop a deeper understanding of the internal corrosion behaviour of the design should a leak occur in the outer copper canister, a set of model canisters was set up in the Äspöunderground laboratory in contact with bentonite with a range of densities. The environmental conditions and electrochemical corrosion behaviour were monitored using a range of techniques. Water analysis and electrochemical measurements indicated an increase in the corrosion rate of both iron and copper in contact with low density bentonite, and of iron only in experiments with no bentonite present. This behaviour may be attributable to microbial activity. The measured corrosion rate depends on the technique used and it will be necessary to confirm the measurements by removal and examination of weight loss coupons. © 2011 Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining.


Del Vecchi R.J.,Technical Consulting Services | Ferro E.,Corry Rubber | Michael R.,Corry Rubber
Rubber World | Year: 2015

Reinforcement of natural rubber by carbon blacks is well known to depend on particle size and structure in their effects on standard physical properties. A study was conducted to show the effects of carbon black on dynamic properties of natural rubber. The study shows that the smaller particle size blacks had higher elongation and tensile strength, while the larger particle size blacks were higher in M-100 levels. There were no particular effects on heat aging according to black type, and only minimal effects, if any, on compression set. The reinforcement of dynamic stiffness according to particle size and structure only generally parallels the effects seen in standard physical properties. There was no correlation between dynamic stiffnesses and durometer hardness or M-100 levels. Carbon black reinforcement has little effect on the response of the polymer to changes in frequency.


Winsley R.J.,Technical Consulting Services | Smart N.R.,Technical Consulting Services | Rance A.P.,Technical Consulting Services | Fennell P.A.H.,Technical Consulting Services | And 2 more authors.
Corrosion Engineering Science and Technology | Year: 2011

This paper summarises recent experimental results from a programme that was carried out to investigate the effects of radiation on the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel, in relation to the overpack that will be used in the Belgian supercontainer concept for radioactive waste disposal. Anaerobic corrosion rates of carbon steel were measured by monitoring hydrogen evolution using manometric gas cells and an autoclave and the corresponding electrochemical behaviour wasinvestigated by measuring open circuit potential, linear polarisation resistance and alternating current impedance. The test medium was alkaline simulated pore water, at c-irradiation dose rates of 0 and 25 Gy h-1, temperatures of 25 and 80°C and chloride concentrations of 0 and 100 mg L-1. The anaerobic corrosion rates exhibited a slow decline due to the formation of magnetite. Good agreement was found with weight loss measurements. A dose rate of 25 Gy h-1 had a negligible effect on gas generation rates. © 2011 Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining.

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