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Boulder City, CO, United States

Maxwell S.,Techknowledgey Strategic Group
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2012

Experts have made significant efforts to demonstrate the true value of water despite increasing costs of water services throughout the US. Some simple facts and figures have been used to demonstrate that consumers are paying less for the high value that they derive water sources and their use. A study conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has suggested that the average residential dwelling pays $474 per year for water services. The AWWA report for 2012, entitled Buried No Longer, states that the same residential user can find his or her rates for water services increasing to $550 to cover the required capital investment costs of maintaining the infrastructure over the next 20 years. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has also reported that the average US family spends less than 0.5% of its disposable income on water.


Maxwell S.,Techknowledgey Strategic Group
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2014

There are several challenges to understand, access, and solve in better water resource management. The twin challenges of water quantity and water quality represents an exemplary crisis. Thousands of people die everyday as a result of water scarcity and quality problems. By better understanding the themes and their implications, groundwork can be laid for more substantive and fundamental solutions to long term water challenges. Shifting patterns of food consumption or changes in customer purchasing could have a major impact on water availability elsewhere in the world. There is one critical and recurring theme within the water market today, the desperate need to better recognize the true value of water, to move toward more realistic and cost-pricing of water and thereby, unlock economic gains and efficiency that would result. Unlike any other commodity, there is no substitute for water.


Maxwell S.,Techknowledgey Strategic Group
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2014

One of the many new studies that have come out very recently is a Carbon Disclosure Project/Deloitte report about water risks. Pointing out that water risks are more immediate and closer than many companies realize and that 50% of companies interviewed have already experienced detrimental business impacts. Most of the groups have developed their own initiatives to address the issue, and have published studies to promote their own positions and issues, including AWWA, the Water Environment Federations, the US Water Alliance, the WateReuse Association, and the National Association of Water Companies. The droughts that many parts of the American West have experienced recently have put water scarcity issues up near the top of the political agenda.


Maxwell S.,Techknowledgey Strategic Group
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2013

The article discusses how to ensure a successful sale of a water company. A wave of consolidation activity has been sweeping over the water industry. This frenzy of investment, merger and acquisition activity has been a constant presence in this industry for about 15 years. Whether one intends to sell one's company now or in five years, whether one plans a gradual internal transfer or an outright sale to a third party, one should always build and run one's company to maximize value. The chief executive officer of a large public company always has as his primary goal the maximization of shareholder value. One should also do the same. A successful process can be greatly helped by careful planning, but fortunate timing and the ability to take advantage of opportunities when they spring up is also important.


Maxwell S.,Techknowledgey Strategic Group
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2012

Steve Maxwell has examined the future of different types of water use and consumption in his book 'The Future of Water.' Economists have traditionally pointed to labor, capital, and energy as primary criteria in economic decision-making. The total amount of water required over the full life cycle to produce a given product or service is referred to as virtual water content. Water will become a more critical issue and key determinant in almost all personal, economic, and business decisions. The buy-local movement, although it has many attractive aspects, may often be in conflict with the concept of water footprint or indeed, simply the local availability of actual water. At the same time, the concept of virtual water has serious limitations, and may in some cases conflict with other trade or consumer objectives, as was discussed previously. Because food requires so much water, international trade patterns in virtual water are essentially a reflection of trade patterns in agricultural commodities.

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