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News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

New exhibits, programs aim to develop the next-generation of social innovators in Silicon Valley SAN JOSE, CA--(Marketwired - November 18, 2016) - The Tech Museum of Innovation is expanding the renowned Tech Awards program to help develop a cadre of young Silicon Valley innovators focused on using technology to benefit humanity. The new program, called The Tech for Global Good, will honor laureates and develop exhibits and programs about their work with the goal of inspiring the next-generation of social entrepreneurs. The announcement was made earlier today at the 16th annual Tech Awards gala, presented by Applied Materials, where seven former laureates were honored for their achievements in using technology to benefit humanity. "It's time to expand The Tech Awards from a single evening enjoyed by a fortunate few to a year-long program," said Tim Ritchie, president and CEO of The Tech. "We have the opportunity to inspire hundreds of thousands of people a year and engage the hearts and minds of young people with purpose-driven technology." The Tech for Global Good program will revolve around a major global issue each year. The program's first focus, beginning in the fall of 2017, will be technology and health. The first exhibits highlighting innovations on this subject will be unveiled at next year's Tech Awards for Global Good, which will be held at The Tech in San Jose. More information is available at www.thetechforglobalgood.org. Highlights from the 16th annual Tech Awards At this year's gala at the San Jose Convention Center, The Tech Awards honored six previous laureates, chosen from among the 287 laureates so far, for the progress they've made since first being honored. Each received a $50,000 unrestricted cash prize. In addition, PATH, a global nonprofit specializing in health innovation, received the third annual Laureate Impact Award for making significant progress toward solving major global problems. The gala also featured a 14-minute documentary of The Tech Awards history, dating back to the first gala in 2001. The awards program has given more than $5 million in unrestricted cash prizes, supporting laureates who have gone on to improve the lives of more than 2 billion people. "Applied Materials is proud to support the work of all the laureates over the last 15 years who have given so generously of their talent, courage and determination," said Joe Pon, corporate vice president at Applied Materials. "These creative entrepreneurs renew our faith in the potential of individuals to apply technology to do good, and remind us how our daily work here in Silicon Valley can improve lives throughout the world." The 2016 Laureate Impact Award PATH: An international nonprofit health organization with a portfolio of 81 products deployed in more than 70 countries. PATH reaches more than 150 million people a year with lifesaving technologies, including a recent meningitis vaccine designed for deployment in Africa that is on pace to protect 400 million people by 2020. PATH also became the first four-time laureate in Tech Awards history. It had previously won Tech Awards in 2003, 2007 and 2009. "The Tech Awards demonstrate how we can apply technology to solve global problems," said Steve Davis, president and CEO of PATH. "There's so much going on in the Bay Area with respect to innovative ideas and technology. Now more than ever it's time to partner across sectors to bring those innovations to scale and really leverage our collective talents and strengths to serve the global good." Intel Environment Award Source International: Provides on-the-ground technical and scientific support to allow local communities to hold mining and oil extraction companies accountable for pollution and illness. Source International was named a Tech Awards laureate in 2014. Microsoft Education Award Equal Access International: Reaches 67 million households in nine countries across Asia, Africa and the Middle East with informative and educational media programs that address critical challenges, especially those focused on women's rights and education. Equal Access was named a Tech Awards laureate in 2003. PayPal Equality Award Souktel: Helps reduce unemployment by connecting employers and job seekers with a matchmaking platform that works on basic phones, reaching 1 million users in 30 emerging markets around the world. Souktel was named a Tech Awards laureate in 2010. Katherine M. Swanson Young Innovator Award Angaza: Removes the upfront price barrier of solar energy products, enabling off-grid customers to prepay for clean energy in affordable amounts. Angaza was named a Tech Awards laureate in 2012. The Sobrato Organization Economic Development Award IDE-India: Invented a low-cost drip irrigation system and foot-powered water pump, which currently reaches 1.38 million households and 7.4 million people in India, leading to cumulative additional net income generation exceeding $1.4 billion. IDE-India was named a Tech Awards laureate in 2004 and 2010. Sutter Health Award D-Rev: Designs and delivers medical technologies for underserved populations, treating more than 100,000 babies with severe jaundice in 2015. D-Rev was named a Tech Awards laureate in 2013. Key sponsors supporting The Tech Awards include Applied Materials, Intel, Microsoft, The Sobrato Organization, Sutter Health, The Swanson Family, PayPal, Qatalyst Partners, Qualcomm, Adobe, NASDAQ Inc., Accenture, Bank of America, Ernst & Young, GoDaddy, KPMG and Charmaine and Dan Warmenhoven. About the Tech Museum of Innovation The Tech is a hands-on technology and science center for people of all ages and backgrounds. Located in the Capital of Silicon Valley, The Tech is a non-profit experiential learning resource established to engage people in exploring and experiencing applied technologies affecting their lives. The Tech's mission is to inspire the innovator in everyone. About Applied Materials Applied Materials, Inc. ( : AMAT) is the leader in materials engineering solutions used to produce virtually every new chip and advanced display in the world. Our expertise in modifying materials at atomic levels and on an industrial scale enables customers to transform possibilities into reality. At Applied Materials, our innovations make possible the technology shaping the future. Learn more at www.appliedmaterials.com.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Equal Access International, an innovative non-profit creating positive social change for millions of underserved people across the developing world, today announced it is the recipient of the 2016 Tech Award in the Microsoft Education Category....


Innovation on Ice activity kicks off March 8 at The Tech Museum of Innovation in partnership with the Sharks Foundation and SAP SAN JOSE, CA--(Marketwired - March 02, 2017) - Kids and their families from across the Bay Area will experiment with physics and ice skates in a new activity called Innovation on Ice, kicking off at The Tech Museum of Innovation on Wednesday, March 8. The engineering design challenge was created by The Tech as part of a partnership with the Sharks Foundation and SAP to give more people access to STEM education and sports-themed science activities. "We are thrilled at this opportunity to inspire students and families with science and technology in a fun and interactive way," Heather Hooper, Sharks Foundation Manager said. "We believe this activity will encourage a new generation of Sharks fans to see themselves as leaders whether playing hockey or in engineering fields." Innovation on Ice is a drop-in activity in which visitors experiment with the physics of ice skating by testing the effects different materials have on friction. Guests will build their own hockey skate blades, replacing the traditional steel blade with CDs, plastics, foams and other familiar materials. They will test their creation on a custom inclined track, precisely monitoring the skate speed to see which material makes a faster skate. Iteration is an important part of the innovation process, and guests are encouraged to adjust their designs and re-test. "SAP is committed to equipping young people with the skills and experiences they need for successful careers in the digital economy. By partnering with The Tech and the Sharks Foundation on this program we're able to show young people that STEM skills are applicable to everything around us, from designing sports equipment to developing software," said John McGee, Managing Director, West Region, SAP North America. More than 400,000 visitors to The Tech every year learn about robotics, bioengineering, cyber security, wearable tech, the engineering design process, and how to creatively solve problems using technology. The Tech also offers free field trips for Title I schools, bringing 25,000 underserved students to the museum for a day dedicated to STEM learning, including hand-on science labs. "We see our visitors grow confident as they tackle fresh challenges every day. This activity is a new and exciting tool to encourage our visitors to see their ability to use technology to solve big problems. Making connections and igniting passions through sports and our downtown neighbors, the San Jose Sharks and SAP, is a great bonus," said Prinda Wanakule, Director of Experience Development and Prototyping. Innovation on Ice is part of a four-year partnership that will include more sports-themed tech and engineering activities. A media event previewing the ice skate activity will happen at The Tech on March 8 at 10:30 a.m. and feature students on field trips, as well as Sharks alumni Rob Zettler, participating in the challenge. Please RSVP to Marika Krause at mkrause@thetech.org. About The Tech Museum of Innovation The Tech is a hands-on technology and science museum for people of all ages and backgrounds. The museum -- located in the Capital of Silicon Valley -- is a non-profit experiential learning resource established to engage people in exploring and experiencing applied technologies affecting their lives. Through programs such as The Tech Challenge, our annual team-design competition for youth, and internationally renowned programs such as The Tech Awards, The Tech endeavors to inspire the innovator in everyone. About The Sharks Foundation Established in 1994, the Sharks Foundation is dedicated to enhancing the lives of youth and families in the community with an emphasis in the areas of education, health and safety, and character development. Since inception, the Sharks Foundation has donated more than $10.1 million to non-profit organizations, including more than $1.5 million during the 2015-16 season. To learn more about how the Sharks Foundation is helping underserved youth and families in need in the community, visit the Sharks Foundation's website or 2015-16 Community Report, or connect via Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. About SAP As market leader in enterprise application software, SAP ( : SAP) helps companies of all sizes and industries run better. From back office to boardroom, warehouse to storefront, desktop to mobile device -- SAP empowers people and organizations to work together more efficiently and use business insight more effectively to stay ahead of the competition. SAP applications and services enable more than 345,000 business and public sector customers to operate profitably, adapt continuously, and grow sustainably. For more information, visit www.sap.com.


News Article | December 11, 2016
Site: www.npr.org

Great ideas are a dime a dozen. The question is: How do you get 'em to stick? That's the theme of this year's Tech Awards. The annual program, hosted by The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, Calif., shines a spotlight on startups that use technology to make lives better in poor countries. But this year, the judging committee — which includes professors from Stanford, Berkeley and Santa Clara University — did something a little different. They looked back at 15 years of winners to find the projects and companies that had not only survived but thrived. That's something that's pretty hard to do, says Leslie Zane, program director of the Tech Awards. "About 10 to 15 percent of the 287 Tech Award laureates don't even exist anymore." When the judges narrowed down the criteria even further, only about 90 of the laureates fit the bill: They were still around, still making progress and most important, "they were being used in ways that the judges hadn't foreseen," she says. Six winners received $50,000 to use as they wish. PATH, a global health nonprofit that works on innovations and advocacy, won the highest honor: the title of the Laureate Impact Award. Here's a look at the winners and the problems they address. 1. Problem: People aren't paying enough attention to women's rights and HIV/AIDS. Solution: Harness the power of media. A San Francisco-based organization called Equal Access International works with local groups to design, produce and distribute quality educational programming for satellite TV and radio in nine countries across Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Even in remote villages, people can tune in with low-cost receivers. What made this nonprofit stand out to the judges, says Zane, is that it began out with just one radio show in 2003 and has significantly expanded. The radio show "Chatting With My Best Friend" in Nepal, which tackles topics like sex and love, started off with a goal to reach 10,000 listeners in 2003. Today, it has 7.2 million listeners. And it's inspired "listening clubs" — groups of young people sitting around the radio listening to the show, then talking about the issues afterward — and copycat programs in other countries. Another example of their work is the radio drama "One Village, A Thousand Voices" in Afghanistan, which creates skits with storylines that touch on everything from human trafficking to solving problems without violence. Equal Access International says its programs now reach 67 million people around the world. 2. Problem: No power, no cash to pay for kerosene for home lamps. Solution: Sell solar devices on an installment plan. A company called Angaza, based in Nairobi and San Francisco, finds companies that make solar lamps, panels and batteries, then embeds special pay-as-you-go tech in its meters. For a $1 to $5 down payment, customers can take home, say, a $15 solar lamp, then pay it off in small increments. If they stop paying, the device switches off. But within a year, they're often able to pay off the full cost so they can keep the device. "It's a neat model. They realized that their pay-as-you-go platform was the really innovative part," says Craig Stephens, a professor of biology at Santa Clara University who was a judge on this year's panel. So far, Angaza has provided solar devices to 250,000 people in sub-Saharan Africa. And now they're working on putting their technology into solar-powered cook stoves and water pumps. 3. Problem: Confronting oil and mining companies that pollute the environment. Solution: Give data to the people who want to protest. Source International works with small towns in countries like Guatemala, Mexico and Peru affected by pollution and health problems caused by big oil and mining companies. A team of scientists and researchers from Italy, Peru and California travel to the areas and gather evidence — like soil, air and water samples. They analyze for signs of pollution and give the information, free of charge, to citizens, who then use it to prove to lawmakers that these big companies have caused serious harm. Since 2009, Source International has provided support for 21 citizen projects in 11 countries on five continents. In 2013, Source International helped the residents of Guerrero, Mexico win $10 million in compensation for environmental damages caused by a nearby mining company. Stephens says it's those "real wins" that impressed the judges this year. 4. Problem: If it's not raining, there's no way to water the crops. Solution: Make a cheap water pump that's easy to use. Many poor farmers in India rely on rains from the monsoon season to water their crops. After that, they look for fields near a river or other water source — even though in many parts of India, there's water in the ground right beneath their feet. The issue is that poor farmers don't know how to use irrigation systems or can't afford them. IDE-India invents affordable irrigation systems, including a foot-powered pump that looks kind of like an elliptical machine from the gym — with bamboo handles. Pedal it and it suctions water from the ground. To convince farmers to give it a try, the New Delhi-based company travels to villages showing Bollywood-style songs and movies of farmers dancing happily in lush fields. Sure it sounds goofy, but it's paired with real-life demos on how to use the pump. "Their technology is not complicated," says Stephens. "It's their marketing and communications strategy that took the company to another level." IDE-India's irrigation products are currently used by 1.3 million households. 5. Problem: Find a cheaper way to treat babies with jaundice. Solution: In the U.S., babies with jaundice may be treated with photo-therapy — shining an intense blue light on the baby's skin. But the light machine can cost $3,000 and is not always available in the developing world. The San Francisco-based nonprofit D-Rev designed a $400 version called Brilliance Pro, which runs on minimal power compared to others on the market. Over the past three years, more than 175,000 infants have been treated with the Brilliance lamp. Zane, director of the Tech Awards, says the lamp has helped drive down the cost of the pricier machines. 6. Problem: Youth unemployment rates are high in the Middle East and Africa — even though there are plenty of jobs to be had. Solution: Use mobile phones to connect employers with qualified workers. A company called Souktel, which has offices in the West Bank and Delaware, created a special app for simple mobile devices that matches employers with workers. Imagine a young person in Ramallah who just graduated college in computer science. She's qualified, hopeful, but can't find work in the IT sector. There are jobs out there, but she can't seem to find them — and employers can't find her, either. So companies pay Souktel to post their jobs on their JobMatch platform for a few cents. The college grad can access the app for free. Since 2006, Souktel has reached 75,000 job seekers in six countries across Africa and Asia, according to a 2016 survey by the World Bank. Job-seekers in the West Bank and Gaza reported higher monthly earnings after finding work through the service. What The Tech Awards loved most about the company? They're finding new ways the app can help: steering Syrian refugees in Turkey to legal advisers, for example, and helping women entrepreneurs in Iraq share career advice with other women.


Patent
Tech Museum of Innovation | Date: 2014-06-25

A user-customizable modular robotic method and system that includes a robot base unit that has a battery housing containing a power source and a magnetic tower connected to the battery housing that includes a plurality of magnetic sockets. The method and system further includes modular components that each include magnetic coupling members attachable to the magnetic sockets, such that the connected modular components receive power from the battery of the base unit. The modular components further include a connection port for data communication with a connected modular component and a processor that can transmit status and query data to the connected modular component. In addition, system and method include a programming station that can be patched to a particular robot that enables a user to easily customize the operation and function of the components of the patched robot using a simple touch and drag user interface.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Secure &Trustworthy Cyberspace | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2015

This project will focus on the topic of Cybersecurity for Middle School Students at Museums in a joint effort between the University at Buffalo (UB) and the Tech Museum of Innovation (The Tech), San Jose. The project will span multiple disciplines ranging from computer science and information systems to forensics and law. The participants shall pay particular attention to concepts and conceptual understanding of cybersecurity. The project will involve the design, development, assessment and refinement of interactive and hands-on experiences in a museum setting, with follow-up workshops targeting middle school students. Given the wide-spread use of the Internet, cybercrime is on the rise and cybersecurity is a much needed component in any STEM curriculum. Exposing students to learning situations through exhibits is a form of informal learning, and the follow-up workshops complement this type of learning with a less informal and more in-depth coverage of the material. The Techs Smart Museum infrastructure will also support data analysis in order to evaluate the educational efficacy and engagement of the hands-on museum experiences and workshops.

The partnership between UB and The Tech will: (a) develop and assess interactive museum exhibits on cybersecurity, and (b) develop and deliver targeted workshops to middle school students. The main objective for the exhibits will be to increase awareness of cybersecurity among a school audience. The main objective for the workshop series will be to build conceptual understanding and subject interest among young students who may otherwise not be exposed to the content. In an effort to help break down the perceived barriers to entry often associated with STEM fields and careers, various object lessons, demonstrations, puzzles, and examples will be extensively utilized. A detailed assessment of student learning and engagement throughout the workshop sessions will be conducted. Also, students in the Information Assurance Scholarship Program and the CyberCorps Program at UB will be involved in various aspects of the proposed project.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Hundreds of visitors build, tinker and learn important skills at Dream Big: Girls Day @ The Tech SAN JOSE, CA--(Marketwired - February 16, 2017) - The Tech Museum of Innovation will host hundreds of girls and their families for "Dream Big: Girls Day @ The Tech" on Presidents Day, Monday, Feb. 20. The event will feature an array of hands-on engineering activities and partners encouraging young women to explore careers in science, technology, engineering and math. The Tech's goal is to inspire the innovator in everyone, which includes equipping and motivating girls with tools they will need to succeed in our technology-driven age. "It's important that we allow girls the opportunity to grow in the tech industry, especially as so many Silicon Valley companies face challenges in diversity. Engineering, computer science and other STEM careers are more appealing to a broader segment of young women when they see the applications of those fields to solve problems and improve lives," said Gretchen Walker, Vice President of Learning at The Tech. Many activities at The Tech are focused on solving a challenge to encourage learning not just for learning's sake, but to creatively solve problems visitors find relevant and interesting. Activities at Girls Day include learning to solder by completing light-up LED circuits; making mushroom bricks, a burgeoning sustainable building material; coding animated digital storybooks; and building devices that harness the power of wind to make deliveries. Research has shown that the gender gap in STEM is not due to innate abilities, but rather to socio-cultural factors, Walker said. She said one important key to promoting women in STEM is raising a generation of young men who see STEM as something where men and women can collaborate as equals. "We intentionally invite boys to The Tech's Girls Days. It makes a big difference for boys and girls to see themselves as equally capable in these fields, and we love watching them learn and innovate together," Walker said. "The best opportunity for successful innovation comes when you have more perspectives at the table." Girls Day will also include a Women in Tech Scavenger Hunt featuring female innovators, giving girls and boys the chance to see how women have already helped shape the world. The event also concludes opening weekend for the film "Dream Big: Engineering Our World" in the Hackworth IMAX Dome Theater. The movie highlights the stories of people behind of some of the biggest marvels in modern engineering. Dream Big: Girls Day @ The Tech is made possible with the generous support of presenting sponsor Intel. Other sponsors include BNY Mellon, Gregory P. Luth & Associates, Inc., Peoples Associates Structural Engineers, Schwegman Lundberg & Woessner, First Tech Federal Credit Union, Accenture and Cisco Systems, Inc. Partners include Benesse, Rogue Making and Girls Make Games. About The Tech Museum of Innovation The Tech is a hands-on technology and science museum for people of all ages and backgrounds. The museum -- located in the Capital of Silicon Valley -- is a non-profit experiential learning resource established to engage people in exploring and experiencing applied technologies affecting their lives. The Tech Challenge and The Tech Awards are signature programs of The Tech. The Tech's mission is to inspire the innovator in everyone. Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/16/11G130543/Images/Girls_Day_at_The_Tech_pic-150-bd60450916429042ad85779b64f943b3.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/16/11G130543/Images/Pic6-8695a2fcdef78abbbf30d59da4a66765.JPG Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/16/11G130543/Images/Girls_Day_at_The_Tech_15-10-10_Hi_Res_pic-61-fe6a80bf23baba5eb07e2c77f33770a0.jpg


News Article | April 23, 2015
Site: www.eweek.com

VIDEO: An interactive exhibit debuts at the RSA conference providing a preview of a larger exhibit set to open in June at the Tech Museum of Innovation. SAN FRANCISCO--According to Lath Carlson, vice president of Exhibits for The Tech Museum of Innovation , there has never been a museum exhibit on cyber-security. That's a situation Carlson is now helping to change thanks to a partnership with the RSA Conference. The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, Calif., is all about showcasing computing innovations, but it has become increasingly clear in recent years that security needs to be part of the overall technology conversation. As such, the Tech Museum of Innovation is now gearing up to launch a new set of exhibits in June, but first the museum has brought a preview to the RSA Conference. The exhibit is called the Cyber Safety Village, and it provides RSA attendees with a peek at some of what will be available in June at the Tech Museum of Innovation. As part of the exhibit are games to help educate on cyber-security and visual displays of what cyber-attacks can look like. One example is a game in the Cyber Safety Village exhibit where attendees attempt to deploy servers and then defend them with firewalls against malicious packets. "When we started this effort, no museum had ever done an exhibit on cyber-security," Carlson told eWEEK.Watch a full video tour of the Cyber Safety Village at RSA Conference 2015 taking place here with Lath Carlson, vice president of Exhibits for The Tech Museum of Innovation, below:Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at eWEEK and InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

RAFT - Resource Area for Teaching, the leading solution center to help educators transform a child’s learning experience through hands-on education, announces the launch of our Rock the Ravine Design Challenge kit. This design challenge is aligned with the theme of the 2017 Tech Challenge which reinforces 21st-century skills including creativity, problem solving, teamwork and critical thinking. The Tech Challenge 2017: Rock the Ravine, presented by Dell, marks the 30th anniversary of this signature program of The Tech Museum of Innovation. Students in Grades 4-12 use the engineering design process to solve a real-world problem. Participants spend months collaborating and becoming deeply engaged in the challenge while documenting their progress and designs. The program culminates in a thrilling two-day showcase April 29th-30th, 2017 when teams put their solutions to the test in front of judges. RAFT has collaborated with The Tech Museum of Innovation to create a design challenge kit to help students who are a part of the competition tackle smaller scale problems in preparation for solving the larger problem of the challenge. “We are thrilled that in addition to helping students work up to solving large problems, this collaboration gives younger students the chance to start building engineering skills,” says Abby Longcor, Senior Director of The Tech Challenge. “This partnership helps bring quality engineering education to diverse neighborhoods across our community by working with groups such as libraries and after-school programs.” In addition, our Rock the Ravine kit enables students in grades K-3 to begin exploring the design process to develop solutions to a real world problem. It contains enough building materials for four to six small groups of students to explore engineering concepts and build ravine-crossing solutions. Materials are upcycled from area manufacturers to promote environmentally friendly learning. Students work in teams to design, build and test a model for safely crossing an obstacle - in this case a crevasse - with a set of criteria and constraints. The students also create a story describing how their design will positively impact the intended users and solve a real-world problem. Other skills learned include developing empathy, brainstorming and critical thinking. "The 2017 Tech Challenge Kit, Rock the Ravine, helps younger students develop critical thinking and problem solving skills. The curriculum includes mini lessons to allow students to explore concepts at their own pace before attempting to synthesize those skills in the design challenge. The Rock the Ravine kits are created from 100% up-cycled materials and are a great example of RAFT's commitment to deeper learning through hands on lessons,” says Jason Pittman, RAFT’s Director of Learning. To learn more about our kit go http://www.raftstore.net/techchallenge2017. For more information about the Tech Challenge https://www.thetech.org/thetechchallenge. RAFT – Resource Area For Teaching is a non-profit, resource solution to help educators transform a child’s learning experience through hands on education to one that inspires the joy and discovery of learning. Founded in 1994, RAFT focuses on providing educators of all types – classroom teachers, after school educators, home-school educators, scout leaders, early care and education professionals – with effective, engaging, affordable hands-on learning resources aligned to national curriculum standards. RAFT, believes the best way to spark a love of learning for the next generation of thinkers, innovators, problem-solvers, and creators is through hands-on learning. RAFT supports some 11,000 educators in enriching and improving the education of more than 850,000 students young year. ©1994-2016 Resource Area For Teaching. All rights reserved. The RAFT logo and RAFT product names referenced herein are trademarks or service marks of RAFT – Research Area For Teaching. All other trademarks, trade names, service marks, and logos referenced herein belong to their respective companies.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

REV®, a San Francisco-based company that provides sustainability education and services, has recently announced a new half-day REV Business Sustainability Workshop in California to help businesses, organizations, and cities capture more value from their sustainability efforts. REV Business Sustainability Workshops are taking place: November 30, 2016 at the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles December 6, 2016 at the Bently Reserve in San Francisco January 25, 2017 at the San Jose Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose Confirmed speakers include sustainable business strategist and GreenBiz Group chairman Joel Makower at the Dec. 6 San Francisco event; and Materials Team Leader (acting) & Green Team Chair Kendra Martin and a panel of her senior management colleagues from UTC Aerospace Systems on Nov. 30 in L.A. Invited speakers include representatives from Disney and Lagunitas Brewing Company. Using the same peer-learning model as REV’s comprehensive Sustainability Circle® program, the interactive workshop features brief presentations, expert speakers, group exercises and discussions, and take-home resources. Participants will learn methods to identify untapped areas of opportunity in energy efficiency, waste, water, and carbon reduction, with employee engagement and behavior change as key focus areas. The half-day program is also designed to provide ample opportunities for networking during a pre-session continental breakfast and a buffet lunch at the conclusion of the workshop. REV developed the half-day program in response to research and experience which found that while many organizations have already initiated some form of sustainability program, nearly all are limited by challenges in management support, staff engagement, ideas and resources, or access to a peer-level cohort for motivation and inspiration. The workshop will be especially useful for senior business leaders seeking to build momentum; generate more energy, resource, and waste savings initiatives; and increase sustainability engagement within their organizations. “With the rapid pace of business, companies and business leaders clearly need more immediately actionable and convenient means to improve the results of their sustainability efforts and investment,” explains VP of Sales Ann O’Neill. “This new workshop, along with current and future REV offerings, makes it easier for organizations to access and benefit from our expertise without a huge time commitment. It’s an excellent way to ensure that 2017 sustainability programs are poised for success.” For more information on REV’s Business Sustainability Workshop and to register visit: revsustainability.com/sustainability-workshop About REV® REV is a sustainability services firm that empowers businesses, municipalities, and institutions to move their vision forward. They provide a unique hybrid of education, expert resources, individualized consulting, and supporting tools that inspire and enable organizations to create positive change in their business and broader community — enhancing employee engagement, saving money and resources, reducing risk, and building resiliency. REV’s flagship Sustainability Circle® program and growing suite of services integrate the best of sustainability with behavior change in a proven peer-learning model to accelerate business impact. The outcome is a 5-year sustainability action plan. Since 2011, over 400 organizations in California and the Midwest have participated in Sustainability Circles with an average projected average annual savings of $342,000; 1.4 million kWh; and 3.7 million gallons of water per customer. More information can be found at http://www.revsustainability.com.

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