Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Perret S.-R.,CIRAD - Agricultural Research for Development | Saringkarn P.,TEAM Consulting Engineering and Management Co. | Jourdain D.,CIRAD - Agricultural Research for Development | Babel M.S.,Asian Institute of Technology
Cahiers Agricultures | Year: 2013

Thailand is spending massive budgets in development and maintenance of irrigation systems for rice production. Along with tighter budgets and the ever-decreasing weight of agriculture in the domestic economy, debates are becoming more intense on the need for alternative, internalized modes of financing irrigation water supply, including farmertargeted charging systems. This article investigates the correlation between the use value of irrigation water and the costs incurred by water supply, on a case study basis, in order to assess the feasibility of charging farmers for such costs. Climatic and production uncertainty was subject to sensitivity analysis (Monte Carlo). Analyses show that the use value (0.35THB/m3 [1 Thai Baht = 0.03 US$]) exceeds total costs (0.1 THB/m3), meaning that farmers could theoretically pay for irrigation water supply. However, results were obtained under favourable production conditions. Furthermore, if farmers were to cover the total cost of irrigation, including capital costs (2,208 THB/ha/season), production costs would then increase by approximately 36% in both seasons. Also, farmers would lose approximately 36% of their net income as water charge in the wet season and 25% in the dry season. If farmers were to pay for operation and maintenance costs only (1,403 THB/ha in both seasons), production costs would then increase by approximately 23%. In view of their low income, charging farmers is not feasible or acceptable. Besides, the study notes that farmers already pay pumping costs at field level, and are well aware of the value of water. This article further discusses alternative charging options, on a broader basis. A charging system spread throughout the rice chain, down to milling, retail, and export segments, proves to be acceptable; it may even include farmers, at low cost for them, and reinstate their status and active participation in the chain. The article also suggests that a broader ecosystem services approach may be used. Source


Ekphisutsuntorn P.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Wongwises P.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Zhu J.,CAS Institute of Physics | Vongvisessomjai S.,TEAM Consulting Engineering and Management Co.
American Journal of Environmental Sciences | Year: 2010

Problem statement: In this study, the changing of wave height at Bangkhuntien during a passage of typhoon LINDA was simulated by using the Simulating WAves Nearshore Model (SWAN) version 40.41. The study domain covered from 99-101°E longitude and 12-14°N in latitude with resolution of 2.4×2.4 km. The simulation covered 10 days during typhoon LINDA entering into the Upper Gulf of Thailand. The wave height and its changing through the Bangkhuntien shoreline were simulated. The simulated significant wave height by the SWAN model at Petchburi and Ko Srichang buoy stations were compared with the observed significant wave height at these stations for the model verification. Approach: The significant wave height at Bangkhuntien shoreline during a passage of typhoon LINDA was simulated. Results: The results indicated that the significant wave height simulated by SWAN model were in good agreement with the observed data. The average simulated significant wave height at Bangkhuntien shoreline was 0.36 m and the significant wave height was in a range of 0.1-0.5 m. before typhoon LINDA entering into the Upper Gulf of Thailand. The significant wave height increased to 2.16, 2.22 and 1.66 m at 26, 18 and 5.7 m sea water depth respectively at the Bangkhuntien shoreline during typhoon LINDA passed. Conclusion: The findings of this study could be useful for the rising wave height, erosive calculation, shoreline protection and coastal zone management when typhoons passed through the Upper Gulf of Thailand. © 2010 Science Publications. Source


Ekphisutsuntorn P.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Wongwises P.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Chinnarasri C.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Vongvisessomjais S.,TEAM Consulting Engineering and Management Co. | Zhu J.,CAS Institute of Physics
American Journal of Environmental Sciences | Year: 2010

Problem statement: In this study, the significant wave height at the Upper Gulf of Thailand and the change of wave height at Bangkhuntien shoreline were simulated by using the Simulating WAves Nearshore Model (SWAN) version 40.51. Approach: The simulated significant wave height by the SWAN model at Petchburi buoy station and Ko Srichang buoy station were compared with the observed significant wave height at these stations for the model verification. The significant wave height by the SWAN model at Bangkhuntien shoreline from 1981-2004 were simulated. Results: The simulated results show that the maximum significant wave height at Bangkhuntien shoreline was in a range of 0.95-2.05 m while the average maximum significant wave height was 1.47 m. The average significant wave height were in a range of 0.29-0.48 m while the average significant wave height of 21 years simulated data at Bangkhuntien shoreline was 0.35 m. Conclusion: The findings of this study could be useful for the erosive calculation, shoreline protection and coastal zone management activities & copy; 2010 Science Publications. Source


Wannawong W.,Srinakharinwirot University | Humphries U.W.,Prince of Songkla University | Wongwises P.,Chulalongkorn University | Vongvisessomjai S.,TEAM Consulting Engineering and Management Co. | Lueangaram W.,Numerical Weather Prediction Center
World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology | Year: 2010

A numerical analysis of wave and hydrodynamic models is used to investigate the influence of WAve and Storm Surge (WASS) in the regional and coastal zones. The numerical analyzed system consists of the WAve Model Cycle 4 (WAMC4) and the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) which used to solve the energy balance and primitive equations respectively. The results of both models presented the incorporated surface wave in the regional zone affected the coastal storm surge zone. Specifically, the results indicated that the WASS generally under the approximation is not only the peak surge but also the coastal water level drop which can also cause substantial impact on the coastal environment. The wave-induced surface stress affected the storm surge can significantly improve storm surge prediction. Finally, the calibration of wave module according to the minimum error of the significant wave height (Hs) is not necessarily result in the optimum wave module in the WASS analyzed system for the WASS prediction. Source


Ekphisutsuntorn P.,Kasetsart University | Wongwises P.,Chulalongkorn University | Chinnarasri C.,King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi | Humphries U.,Prince of Songkla University | Vongvisessomjai S.,TEAM Consulting Engineering and Management Co.
World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology | Year: 2010

In this paper, the significant wave height at the Upper Gulf of Thailand and the changing of wave height at Bangkhuntien shoreline were simulated by using the Simulating WAves Nearshore Model (SWAN) version 40.51. The simulated results indicated that the significant wave height by SWAN model corresponded with the observed data. The results showed that the maximum significant wave height at the Bangkhuntien shoreline were 1.06-2.05 m. and the average significant wave height at the Bangkhuntien shoreline were 0.30-0.47 m. The significant wave height can be used to calculate the erosion through the Bangkhuntien shoreline. The erosion rates at the Bangkhuntien shoreline were prepared by using the aerial photo and they were about 1.80 m/yr. from 1980-1986, 4.75 m/yr from 1987-1993, 15.28 m/yr from 1994-1996 and 10.03 m/yr from 1997-2002. The relation between the wave energy and the erosion were in good agreement. Therefore, the significant wave height was one of the major factors of the erosion at the Bangkhuntien shoreline. Source

Discover hidden collaborations