Wheat Ridge, CO, United States

TDA Research, Inc.

www.tda.com
Wheat Ridge, CO, United States

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Patent
TDA Research, Inc. | Date: 2016-09-02

The present invention relates to a method for treating plant pests or pathogens. The disclosed method of protecting plants against pests includes a plant protection composition, wherein the plant protection composition comprises a water-soluble activator and a benefit active precursor. The composition is applied externally to the plant where a benefit active species is generated in situ, thus mitigating the pest.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.95K | Year: 2016

TDA proposes to continue their work on both corrosion sensor development and predictive modeling of corrosion damage with the vision of integrating sensor and modelling for adaptive prognosis of corrosion damage initiation in a unified framework. TDA focuses its research to understand the crack initiation from different electrochemical conditions and corrosion-deformation interaction effects in order to develop sensor-informed analysis components in a life prediction framework called UniCorr. TDA initially targets predicting damage and remaining useful life in CF and SCC in Navy aircraft within a crack initiation approach.The analysis components, which consists of both continuum and microstructural models, for specific material-environment systems and loading conditions (static and fatigue), will be validated using critical laboratory tests and Navy service data. The sensors will use a novel combination of corroborative technologies to measure onset of crack nucleation. In the initial stages, the development on analysis components and sensors will proceed in an uncoupled manner, and will be fused in later stages after extensive verification and validation from laboratory and field tests and performance.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

Statement of the problem or situation that is being addressed throughout Phase I portion of your proposal Glycerol is a low-value by-product of biodiesel production and other oleochemical transformations, but it can be converted into dozens of different C2 and C3 products via oxidation or dehydration reactions. Some of these potential products are high value chemical intermediates, for example acrolein. Unfortunately, the dehydration of glycerol is very nonspecific, generally yielding a mixture of C3 compounds as well as unwanted poly-glycerols. General statement of how this problem is being addressed What is needed is a atomically, or molecularly-precise catalyst structure containing heterogeneous solid acid reactive sites inside size selective nanopores so that the glycerol can be selectively dehydrated to a single high value intermediate. Acrolein is an ideal product made by the double dehydration of glycerol over an acid catalyst. Dehydration of acrolein as an isolated molecule inside a precisely sized and perfectly uniform nanopore should help prevent oligomers from forming, and temporarily confining it in the nanopore should promote the double dehydration required to make acrolein instead of other dehydration products. What is to be done in Phase I? TDA proposes to make atomically-precise solid acid catalysts from the self-assembly of polymerizable surfactant monomers, to produce a nanoporous polymer with pores just large enough for glycerol atoms to enter and with 100% atomically identical catalyst sites contained within these pores to maximize the production of acrolein, while preventing unwanted side reactions. Commercial Applications include the conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production into a high the value C3 intermediate (acrolein), which is used to produce C3 chemicals normally made from. These compounds include high volume C3 materials such as acrylic acid. Key Words – atomically precise, nonoporous, polymer solid acid catalyst. Summary for Members of Congress: Glycerol is a low value by-product of biodiesel production and other oleochemical transformations. This project will develop a new selective catalyst that will convert glycerol into acrolein, a high value intermediate used to make numerous high volume materials currently made from petroleum.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

Statement of the Problem There are many processes that can be used convert coal into fuels, chemicals and electrical power including direct combustion (power generation), gasification (chemicals, fuels and power) and direct liquefaction (fuels). Of all of these processes, only coal gasification has the potential to make fuels, chemicals and power along with the possibility for CO2 capture and sequestration. Unfortunately, coal gasification is expensive and to make the process economically viable generally requires very large, capital intensive plants to achieve economies of scale. As a result, small scale gasification for local/on-site uses (such as local power generation) is not economical. What is needed is a new gasification technology that is more economical at small scales, and can be part of a modular power/fuels/chemicals production facility. How it is Being Addressed Our goal is to solve this problem by developing a unique gasification reactor technology that takes advantage of the fact that small coal particles are more reactive than conventional pulverized coal. In our technology, the gasifier can be small enough that it can be economically constructed without using a refractory lining, thus reducing its cost and making the gasifier faster to start and stop as needed. What is Being Done in Phase I In Phase I, we will quantify the reactivity of two types of coal as a function of particle size using our stationary bubbling fluidized bed reactor system that uses a special heat transfer medium that keeps the coal particles in an isothermal environment. We will use statistically designed experiments to develop an empirical model of coal reactivity and correlate the results with detailed analysis of both the coal and the ash formed during gasification. We will then design, build and test a cold flow model of our novel gasification reactor and use the test results to design a high temperature, high pressure metal gasifier to be built and tested in Phase II. Commercial Applications Our gasifier design will be ideally suited for skid-mounted gasification units. In terms of skid mounted gasification units, the most appropriate use for such systems is probably on-site generation of electricity using a gas turbine or an internal combustion engine. Finally, this gasifier design would be ideally suited for use at mine-mouth or coal preparation locations. Key Words – Coal, gasification, micronized coal


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 900.83K | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant In this SBIR Phase II project the mechanical and fatigue related properties of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene UHMWPE joint implant materials will be improved by creating a composite material with carbon reinforcements UHMWPE has long been widely used as wear surfaces in joint implants and further improvements to its wear resistance have been obtained by cross linking the polyethylene chains However the cross linking process also degrades some mechanical properties including toughness fatigue and yield strengths Incorporating carbon reinforcements into UHMWPE through the manner described will improve the strength crack propagation resistance and creep resistance of UHMWPE without compromising its low wear rate The carbon reinforcements will impart unmatched dimensional stability and toughness to the UHMWPE matrix Moreover as the wear surface remains primarily UHMWPE the outstanding wear resistance of UHMWPE will be maintained if not improved through the mechanical enhancements Several of these hypotheses were validated during Phase I by preparing composite materials under various formation conditions and then assessing their mechanical and tribological properties Should the new UHMWPE materials perform according as expected the benefits would include longer lasting implants that are less prone to mechanically induced failure The composite materials would therefore require fewer revision procedures and maintain functionality longer a critical need as life expectancy increases are causing people to outlive their implants PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Joint implants are an effective treatment for those with rheumatoid arthritis osteoarthritis osteonecrosis and other severe destructive injuries within the U S alone roughly joint replacements are performed each year As life expectancy increases patients more frequently outlive the circa year lifetime of their implant This projet will introduce a new material from which prosthetics with longer lifetimes can be fabricated


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1000.00K | Year: 2015

The electricity produced from fossil fuels is essential to the worlds prosperity and security. On the other hand, increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration caused by the fossil fuel combustion are causing concerns regarding global warming. Although there are several methods for separating CO2 from the flue gases at existing coal-fired power plants, all of them have significant drawbacks, including loss of efficiency and increased capital and operating costs that dramatically increase the cost of electricity. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA), in collaboration with Membrane Technology Research Corporation and the University of California, Irvine are developing a low cost, high capacity sorbent that will integrate into a membrane-sorbent hybrid post-combustion carbon capture system to remove CO2 from coal-fired power plant effluents. In Phase I, we optimized the sorbent to meet the needs of the application. Our preliminary analysis results indicate the sorbent system operated in a concentration swing mode will have a significantly lower cost than an equivalent membrane system, increasing the economic viability of the carbon capture process. Sorbent improvements also enabled lower oxygen transfer rates from the boiler air intake side to the flue gas side. The process simulation suggested a plant efficiency of 29.74% for the hybrid system which is well above that can be achieved by the state-of-the-art amine scrubbing technology and the CO2 capture cost is estimated to be less than $42.2 per tonne on 2007 $ basis. In our Phase II work, we will work on further enhancing the CO2 capacity of the sorbent, while further reducing their oxygen affinity. We will assess the impact of critical parameters at bench- scale and carry out adsorption/desorption cycles (a minimum of 10,000 cycle test). We will then assess the performance of an integrated 2 to 5 scfm unit in the field using actual coal-derived flue gas. We will carry out the process simulation work and evaluate the techno-economic viability of the new CO2 capture technology retrofit to the existing pulverized coal power plants using the methodology described in NETLs Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines. CO2 is a major greenhouse gas and the most dominant source for the anthropogenic CO2 emissions. It is a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels, in particular burning coal for generating electricity. The proposed technology will provide a cost effective way to control CO2 emissions from the existing and new coal-fired power plants. There will be a large market when legislation limiting or taxing carbon emissions is put in place.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.98K | Year: 2016

Polyethylene, and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in particular, is an outstanding material for radiation shielding in the sense that its extraordinarily high hydrogen content both minimizes the production of secondary ions during exposure to energetic radiation and captures neutrons. Its low density and high wear resistance also make it attractive for the structures of manned spacecraft and extraterrestrial habitats. However, its use in structures is limited by its flammability and poor mechanical properties under load compared to other structural materials. While carbon fiber/UHMWPE are an obvious solution, to date they have not proved useful because load is not easily transferred to or from UHMWPE, and because its melt state is too viscous to infiltrate fiber preforms. In this Phase II project, TDA will apply its recent advances in composite manufacturing to create a UHMWPE-matrix composite that has good load transfer to a creep-mitigating continuous fiber reinforcement. Such a composite will not only have outstanding radiation shielding properties, but also have sufficient mechanical properties to be useful as a structural material.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

Stainless steel dry storage canisters are used for storage of nuclear waste. Recent work has shown that these containers are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking at the weldments under the chloride containing dust and humidity conditions present underground which is a potentially catastrophic event. Understanding stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in stainless steel dry storage canisters is needed. To ensure their long-term structural health and to design monitoring procedures a good understanding of SCC in stainless steel canisters is necessary. General statement of how this problem is being addressed Understanding of the initiation and progression of chloride-induced SCC is needed to define monitoring programs that ensure safe storage of nuclear waste materials. In this SBIR project TDA will study the evolution of stress corrosion cracking and crack growth rate and develop predictive models that can be coupled with the monitoring data to provide an early alert of SCC. What is to be done in Phase I: TDA Research will study stress corrosion cracking of sensitized AISI SS304 and welded samples of AISI SS304 under the conditions that cause SCC in storage. We will conduct a multifaceted experimental study to understand and characterize sensitized SCC. We will employ prediction/analysis techniques previously used for analogous phenomena to provide a deeper understanding of the SCC process and predict crack formation and growth rate so that appropriate monitoring protocols can be designed. Specifically, we will simultaneously collect acoustic emission (AE), electrochemical noise (EN) and elongation/creep data as a function of time and corrosion conditions to determine how the signal changes as a function of the time evolution of microcracking that leads to fracture. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits The understanding of stress corrosion cracking, its early detection, and the time-failure monitoring approach developed in this project are applicable to not only nuclear waste storage containers but to the austenite stain steel used in chemical and power plants. Stress corrosion cracking can cause a disastrous failure to occur unexpectedly and with minimal overall material loss. Proper monitoring to prevent stress corrosion cracking is of great benefit to public health and safety and to the environment. Key Words: Stress corrosion cracking, nuclear waste, dry storage canisters, sensitization, crack growth rate


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

Reverse osmosis (RO) is a proven membrane technology for seawater desalination. Although the cost of RO desalinated water has been significantly reduced, it still remains fairly high, as compared to other drinking water sources, mainly due to the high operating pressures required (typically 800-1000 psi) and also the low flux of purified water through the membrane. Higher performance membranes are clearly needed to reduce both the energy consumption and capital cost of desalinating water. This proposed SBIR project will seek to develop a polymeric desalination membrane with a very thin skin layer of a covalently bonded polymer material having molecularly precise, size-selective nanopores, that will provide a much higher water flux than existing reverse osmosis membranes. In Phase I TDA will develop and characterize new reverse osmosis membranes based on a polymer membrane with a nanoporous polymer selective skin layer, TDA Research will test these new membrane for desalination under a variety of water salinities and temperatures and determine if the new membrane will allow TDA Research to meet the DOE goal for at least an order of magnitude increase in water flux, while maintaining the selectivity (rejection) of salt ions. This research project will seek to address the limitations of membranes used in seas water desalination. This project will develop a high performance membrane with a proprietary nanoporous polymer that increases the throughput of purified water in membrane desalination plants, thus significantly lowering the energy usage and cost. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: Commercial Applications include large municipal desalination plants, and other desalination application such as at-sea water purification (ships, military), power generation, oil & gas, mining and water systems at remote resorts.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.66K | Year: 2015

Military personnel must be protected from diseases transmitted by ticks and fleas, including Lyme disease. Effective surveillance of tick and flea vectors is vital to determine the population present, whether they are carrying disease, and whether control campaigns are working. Unfortunately, current surveillance tools are ineffective. In Phase I TDA designed, prototyped, and tested a novel tick and flea trap that utilized our previously developed portable CO2 generator as an attractant (Figure 1). We used laboratory tests to identify some of the key operating parameters, including the CO2 flow rate, and verified the performance of the trap in field tests. The trap design incorporates features to retain the catch, while making them easy to recover for identification and analysis for diseases. In Phase II we will complete development ad supply DoD with prototype traps, again using laboratory and field tests to optimize the design.

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