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Fort Worth, TX, United States
Fort Worth, TX, United States
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He's the age of most high school freshmen, but this 14-year-old left many stunned as he walked across the stage to receive his college degree. Carson Huey-You graduated high school at the young age of 10, started attending Texas Christian University when he was 11, and received his bachelor's degree in physics on May 6. Read: Dad Sits In on Son's Class After Getting Multiple Complaints From Teacher Carson became the youngest person ever to graduate from the university. Carson’s younger brother, 11-year-old Cannan, also graduated high school and is set to attend TCU in the fall to major in astrophysics and engineering. "Yes, they’re smart," Claretta Kimp, Carson’s mom, told The Washington Post. “But that’s just a small part of who they are.” Kimp said she knew early on that Carson was gifted — especially when he told her he wanted to do calculus at just 3 years old. “So I got him a little calculus book and he could work some of the very first questions in the book and then I thought, 'Um, okay, you’re really smart,'" Kimp said. Carson was homeschooled as a child. Kimp converted a spare bedroom in their home to a classroom before Carson was walking. She said he was extremely excited to learn. He was reportedly reading chapter books by the age of 2. At age 5, he was on an eighth grade level and Kimp found a small private school that would allow him to learn on the level he was on. He graduated co-valedictorian at 10 years old and then he was off to TCU. “The first day of class, I was very nervous, kinda, about what I was walking into," Carson said. "Going from a small private school to this big campus, but after the first day of class and once I sort of got used to the overall TCU feel, I was very comfortable." Kimp said she was less nervous about him starting college than she’d been about him starting high school as a 5-year-old. “Even though he was 11, in a classroom with 18-year-olds and so forth, I felt that he was safe and I sat right outside the classroom door the whole time so it wasn’t like I was scared or uncomfortable,” Kimp said Read: Dad Sits In on Son's Class After Getting Multiple Complaints From Teacher Dr. Magnus Rittby, a professor at the school, said it’s been a unique experience working with Carson. “He will never be as anyone else because of his age and so that will always be a factor, but we’re trying to eliminate that as much as possible and treat them as adults when that’s appropriate and as kids when that’s appropriate," Rittby said. "Because he needs to be able to go between those two worlds still in order to make it to wherever he’s going in the future." Watch: Why This 7-Year-Old Science Whiz Is Being Called the Next Einstein


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Margo Dean, founder and artistic director of Ballet Concerto Inc., a Fort Worth institution that has presented an annual free-to-the-public, fully-staged professional dance production each June since 1981, has announced that the company’s SUMMER DANCE CONCERT performances will move from Trinity Park to The Heart of the Ranch at Clearfork adjacent to the Trinity River and a part of the Clearfork Developments in near Southwest Fort Worth. Concert dates are Thursday, June 22, 2017, for an invitational gala opening night private performance, followed by public performances with no tickets required for lawn seating on Friday, June 23; Saturday, June 24; and Sunday, June 25. Curtain is at 8:30 p.m. except Sunday evening, with curtain at 8:00 p.m. Gates open an hour before curtain. Tickets for the private opening night gala start at $100 per person and are available by calling Ballet Concerto at 817-763-5087 or emailing j.simus(at)jansimusevents(dot)com. Festivities begin at 6:00 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday public performances offer gratis lawn seating; no tickets are necessary. However, patrons may purchase preferred location, reserved table seating each evening, starting at $50 per person. For table details and purchases, call 817-763-5087 or 817-738-7915 or go to their ticketing site. The program for the 2017 SUMMER DANCE CONCERT, entitled Art of the Dance, will feature four varied works, two of which are world premieres: The cast will include Ballet Concerto company dancers and guest professionals who will have arrived in Fort Worth to audition for roles, rehearse, perform and teach at the annual Ballet Concerto Summer Dance Workshop that begins in early June and culminates with the concert. The Workshop takes place at Margo Dean School of Ballet. At press time, featured guest choreographers for 2017 “Art of the Dance” performances include: Luis Montero, renowned Flamenco artist and celebrated Spanish choreographer, traveling to Fort Worth from his home in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. He has choreographed for Ballet Concerto for 28 years. Bruce Marks, former artistic director of Ballet West, Boston Ballet, and Orlando Ballet, has had a stellar and distinguished career as principal dancer, artistic director, choreographer, and administrator. Retired from the stage, he continues to work as a guest choreographer, coach, and teacher as well as acting as judge for international ballet competitions. Elise Lavallee, an experienced dancer, teacher, and choreographer for many productions in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. As a student, she trained with Margo Dean School of Ballet and has performed with Ballet Concerto, Casa Manana, Dallas Theater Center, Lyric Stage, and many other respected venues. She is both a teacher and choreographer at Margo Dean School of Ballet. With the move to The Heart of the Ranch at Clearfork, Ballet Concerto hopes to be even more accessible to audiences from throughout the area, according to the company. The Heart of the Ranch at Clearfork, located at 5000 Clearfork Main Street in Fort Worth, TX 76109, has adjacent parking that will easily accommodate 800 cars. Nearby residential properties and numerous retail and restaurant businesses are within walking distance. Chisholm Trail Parkway access is within a quarter-mile. To open the four-performance schedule, the Thursday evening SUMMER DANCE CONCERT debut gala, Ballet, Burgers and Beaujolais, is a fund raiser; patrons are admitted by pre-purchased ticket only. The evening starts at 6:00 p.m. and includes fine wine and other potables, a gourmet hamburger feast and both a silent and live auction before the curtain rises for the opening night performance. Local artist Avery Kelly’s commemorative limited edition Art of the Dance posters will be on sale at the gala; the original oil painting that inspired the poster will be auctioned off. Gala hosts include chairs Jan Simus Curry, Ray Griffith, and the Board of Directors of Ballet Concerto, Ellen Dast, president. To purchase gala tickets, beginning at $100 per person, please call (817) 763-5087. Friday, Saturday, and Sunday evening general admission lawn seating (appropriate for picnics) is complimentary and open to the public; many attendees bring their own lawn chairs and blankets. No tickets are required. Preferred table seating tickets are available, beginning at $50 for single seats, a table for four at $200, and a reserved table of 10 for $500. For more on table seating, visit balletconcerto.com or call (817) 763-5087. “We are absolutely thrilled to offer our mixed repertoire production this year at The Heart of the Ranch at Clearfork,” Ms. Dean said. “We are incredibly grateful to the Edwards family for their support in facilitating our production at this glorious site.” For the past 12 years, the SUMMER DANCE CONCERT performances have been held at the Trinity Park Pavilion just east of the Trinity River on West 7th Street. Following the river southwest, the stunning new The Heart of the Ranch at Clearfork venue has groves of mature oaks and views of the Trinity. It’s just off Chisholm Trail Parkway, close to TCU, and next door to popular destinations like Press Café and to the expanding Shops at Clearfork, where Neiman Marcus recently relocated. Margo Dean is herself a Fort Worth institution. In addition to founding the company and dancing professionally for decades, she launched the Fort Worth Ballet Association in the 1950s and the careers of scores of successful professionals. Fort Worth Ballet Association has evolved into today’s Texas Ballet Theatre. She continues teaching at her ballet studio and school formed nearly sixty years ago, Margo Dean School of Ballet, home of the Summer Dance Workshop. Leading up to the performances, this year’s Summer Dance Workshop has over three weeks of classes for intermediate through advanced and professionals, as well as adult classes in ballet, pointe, jazz, and Flamenco taught. Classes are taught by resident faculty, SUMMER DANCE CONCERT company dancers, and visiting guest teachers and master teachers. Instructors will include Mr. Marks, Webster Dean, Ruben Gerding, Liuba Paterson, Rose Miller, Courtney Sebastian, Kathy Head Kiefer, Brandon Nguyen, Elise Lavallee, Perla Montoya, Libby Kroger and Kathleen Steiner. For Workshop information and registration, please contact registrar Debbie Evans at margodeanschool(at)att(dot)net or call 817-738-7915. The annual SUMMER DANCE CONCERT is made possible through individual, corporate and foundation donations and concert sponsorships. The underwriting enables the company to offer their production free to the public. 2017 Art of the Dance sponsorships are available at the following levels: To coincide with the move to The Heart of the Ranch at Clearfork and for the first time, Ballet Concerto will feature a local fine artist’s work on a commemorative 2017 SUMMER DANCE CONCERT poster that ties into the theme, Art of the Dance. Avery Kelly will create an original oil on canvas (30” X 40”) that will be reproduced as limited edition posters, on sale at the Gala (and signed by the artist) and, if posters remain, also for sale during the SUMMER DANCE CONCERT performances. Ballet Concerto is talking to nearby businesses who might be interested in displaying the work during the weeks preceding opening night. The original painting will be auctioned off at the Thursday evening gala festivities. Proceeds from the painting and poster sales will benefit Ballet Concerto Inc. Avery Kelly is a contemporary artist whose work centers on the beauty and energy of the natural world. Specializing in oil painting and relief printmaking, she strives to convey a sense of joy and mystery through her work. Her website is averykellyart.com. Now in its 48th year, Ballet Concerto Inc. is a non-profit performing arts and educational organization. The company is best known for its annual SUMMER DANCE CONCERT, a free, fully staged, professional mixed-repertoire ballet production held in an outdoor venue in Fort Worth for four nights in late June. Ballet Concerto also has a December holiday performance at Will Rogers Auditorium for thousands of school children in the area, presents lecture demonstrations in February of each year at a number of elementary schools and runs operation F.I.N.D. (Find and Inspire New Dancers) to identify and provide scholarships for classes and training for promising young people interested in the art of dance. With a board of directors of 15 and an advisory board of 28, the organization accepts memberships from $25.00 annually. For membership information, please contact j.simus(at)jansimusevents(dot)com, info(at)balletconcerto(dot)com or call 817-763-5087.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

CORRECTS LAST NAME TO PURINTON - This undated photo provided by the Henry County Sheriff's Office in Clinton, Mo., shows Adam Purinton, of Olathe, Kan., who was arrested early Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, in connection with a shooting at a bar in Olathe that left one person dead and and wounding two others. Purinton waived extradition during a brief court hearing in Henry County in Missouri and will be returned to Kansas. (Henry County (Mo.) Sheriff's Office via AP) OLATHE, Kan. (AP) — The Latest on a deadly shooting at a Kansas bar that some witnesses said was racially motivated (all times local): About 60 children were playing at a church across the street from a suburban Kansas City bar when a shooting happened at the tavern earlier this week. Jeramie Albin, a volunteer for the youth program at First Baptist Church in Olathe, Kansas, said Friday that he didn't think much about a noise that sounded like "somebody dropped a bunch of books." Then he learned about the shooting at Austins Bar and Grill. The church immediately went into lockdown after the shooting Wednesday. Volunteers herded children into the church basement, careful not to scare them, while police officers arrived on the scene. For the next 20 minutes, volunteers led songs to distract the children from police lights outside and helicopters overhead. Church staff members say Austins is a family-oriented business where church members often go with their children to eat. Residents of a Kansas City suburb gathered at a church to honor a man who died in a shooting earlier this week at a bar across the street. About 400 people sang, prayed and lit candles Friday night at First Baptist Church in Olathe, Kansas, to honor Srinivas Kuchibhotla. He was killed and two other men were wounded Wednesday at Austins Bar and Grill. Those in attendance described the community as "tight-knit" and one that embraces diversity. Witnesses said the suspect yelled "get out of my country" and opened fire. Kuchibhotla was Indian and so is one of the wounded men. Mayor Michael Copeland encouraged people to come together and said, "One evil act does not divide a united community." The church offered counseling services and created a "hope banner" to use at a march scheduled for Sunday. A trauma surgeon says a Missouri man who is recovering from injuries he suffered in a shooting in a suburban Kansas City bar is doing "fairly well" and "hopefully will not be in the hospital too much longer." Ian Grillot was one of two men injured in a shooting at Austins Bar & Grill in Olathe, Kansas. Another man died in the shooting. Dr. Ashley Bennett said Friday in a video provided by the University of Kansas Health System that a bullet went through the hand of Ian Grillot (GRILL'it) and lodged in his chest. Bennett says the hand injury is more difficult to treat than the shot in the chest, but Grillot should eventually recover from both injuries. Witnesses say Grillot tried to stop the accused gunman, Adam Purinton, after the shooting. Purinton is jailed on murder and attempted murder charges. Three GoFundMe sites started for one man who was killed and two others who were injured at a suburban Kansas City bar have raised a total of more than $670,000. The sites were set up to help pay expenses for Srinivas Kuchibhotla, who died in the shooting Wednesday at Austins Bar & Grill in Olathe. His friend, Alok Madasani, was wounded. Another man, Ian Grillot, was shot when he tried to stop the gunman. As of Friday afternoon, the site for Kuchibhotla, whose funeral will be in India, had more than $410,000. A second combined campaign for Kuchibhotla and Madasani had close to $61,000 and a third site for Grillot was up to more than $200,000. Adam Purinton is jailed on murder and attempted murder charges. His first court appearance is scheduled for Monday. The wife of a man who was killed in a shooting at a suburban Kansas City bar said she wonders what the U.S. will do to stop hate crimes against minorities. Sunayana Dumala spoke at a news conference Friday organized by Garmin, where her husband, Srinivas Kuchibhotla, worked before he was shot to death Wednesday in an attack at Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe that witnesses could have been racially motivated. Adam Puriton, of Olathe, is charged with premeditated first-degree murder and two counts of attempted premeditated first degree murder in the attack, which also left two men injured. He has not been charged with a hate crime. Dumala says she was concerned about shootings in the U.S. and wondered if they should stay in the country, but her husband said "good things happen in America." She also said reports of bias in the country make minorities afraid of being in the country. She says she wants an answer to one question — "Do we belong here?" Phone logs from the Henry County, Missouri, 911 center detail the phone call that led to the arrest of a man charged with fatally shooting a man and wounding two other people in a suburban Kansas City bar. The logs indicate a bartender at an Applebee's in Clinton, Missouri, called the 911 center at 11:37 p.m. Wednesday and said a man in the bar told her he had "done something bad" and was on the run from police for shooting two people in Olathe, Kansas. Adam Puriton was arrested shortly after the bartender placed the call. He is charged with premeditated first-degree murder and two counts of attempted premeditated first-degree murder in the attack Wednesday night at Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe, Kansas. He was extradited back to Kansas on Friday. A man charged with killing an Indian man and wounding two other people at a suburban Kansas City bar has been extradited from Missouri to Kansas. A Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Office spokesman says 51-year-old Adam Purinton, of Olathe, Kansas, was moved Friday. Bond is set at $2 million. Purinton is charged with premeditated first-degree murder and two counts of attempted premeditated first degree murder in the attack Wednesday night at Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe. Some witnesses said the shooting was racially motivated. Purinton was arrested hours later at a bar in Clinton, Missouri, and waived extradition. His first appearance is scheduled for Monday. An attorney hasn't been formally assigned because Purinton hasn't yet appeared in court in the county. A church near a suburban Kansas City bar that was the scene of a deadly shooting is planning a vigil. KCTV-TV (http://bit.ly/2lgJ9IS ) reports that the First Baptist Church of Olathe is opening its doors Friday night for employees of Austins Bar and Grill and the community. The church was filled with around 80 children and some parents when shots rang out Wednesday night across the street. Some witnesses said the attack that killed an Indian man and wounded two others was racially motivated. The church went on lockdown before the manhunt ended hours later in Clinton, Missouri, with the arrest of 51-year-old Adam Purinton. He's charged with murder and attempted murder. Pastor Susan Peach says what happened is "a horrible thing" and "beyond what people can process on their own." A man who was shot in the chest in a Kansas bar shooting that left an Indian man dead is recovering. A University of Kansas Hospital spokeswoman says 24-year-old Ian Grillot, of Grandview, Missouri, is in fair condition. Grillot told the spokeswoman he still feels very sore after being shot Wednesday while trying to intervene in the attack in Olathe, Kansas. Some witnesses have said the attack was racially motivated. Grillot said in a recorded interview Thursday that the bullet went through his right hand and into his chest, just missing a major artery but fracturing a vertebra in his neck. Another man hurt in the shooting has been released from the hospital. Fifty-one-year-old Adam Purinton was arrested hours later in Clinton, Missouri. He's charged with murder and attempted murder. A man suspected of killing an Indian man and wounding two other people at a suburban Kansas City bar served in the Navy. A Navy official could provide no other details about 51-year-old Adam Purinton's service because the records are old. The official was not authorized to discuss the issue publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. Purinton is charged with premeditated first-degree murder and two counts of attempted premeditated first degree murder in the attack Wednesday night at Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe, Kansas, that some witnesses said was racially motivated. Kansas voter records show Purinton is registered at an Olathe, Kansas, address within blocks of a manufacturing plant operated by GPS-maker Garmin. LinkedIn accounts say the two Indian men who were shot worked at Garmin. Lolita Baldor in Washington, D.C., contributed to this item. A man suspected of killing an Indian man and wounding two other people at a suburban Kansas City bar is awaiting extradition. Fifty-one-year-old Adam Purinton is charged with premeditated first-degree murder and two counts of attempted premeditated first degree murder in an attack Wednesday night at Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe, Kansas, that some witnesses said was racially motivated. He was arrested hours after the shooting at a bar in Clinton, Missouri, and he has waived his right to fight extradition. Bond is set at $2 million. Johnson County, Kansas, Sheriff's Deputy Rick Howell said authorities aren't releasing details about when Purinton will be picked up for security purposes. An attorney hasn't been formally assigned because Purinton hasn't yet appeared in court. An Indian man who survived a suburban Kansas City bar shooting that killed his friend and wounded a man who tried to intervene has been released from the hospital. The Kansas City Star (http://bit.ly/2kQvSu4 ) reports that 32-year-old Alok Madasani was released Thursday from the University of Kansas Hospital. The Star says 24-year-old Ian Grillot is improving. The hospital hasn't provided an update on his condition Friday morning. The shooting Wednesday night at Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe, Kansas, killed 32-year-old Srinivas Kuchibhotla. Witnesses said the shooting was racially motivated. Grillot said in a videotaped interview released by the hospital that he "prayed all night for both of them" but that "unfortunately only one of my prayers were heard." Fifty-one-year-old Adam Purinton is charged with murder and attempted murder in the shooting. The owner of a suburban Kansas City bar where an Indian man was fatally shot and two other men were wounded says it will do anything it can to support the victims. Owner Brandon Blum wrote on the website for Austins Bar & Grill in Olathe, Kansas, that the staff's "thoughts and prayers are with the families and friends of the victims" of the Wednesday night shooting that some witnesses described as racially motivated. Fifty-one-year-old Adam Purinton was arrested hours later, 70 miles away in Clinton, Missouri, and has been charged with murder and attempted murder. The FBI is helping police investigate. The bar's website said the restaurant is "sorry that this happened on our premises" and that it will be "working diligently, doing anything we can to support and help the parties that were involved." The bar plans to reopen Saturday. A man accused of shooting two Indians in a crowded suburban Kansas City bar, killing one man and injuring two others in an attack that some witnesses said was racially motivated, has been charged with murder and attempted murder. Authorities repeatedly declined at a Thursday news conference to say whether the shooting was a hate crime although local police said they were working with the FBI to investigate the case. A bartender at Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe, Kansas, said Adam Purinton used "racial slurs" before he started shooting Wednesday night as patrons were watching the University of Kansas-TCU basketball game on television. Police say 32-year-old Srinivas Kuchibhotla died at an area hospital. They say 32-year-ol Alok Madasani and 24-year-old Ian Grillot were hospitalized and are in stable condition.


DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Consolidated-Tomoka Land Co. (NYSE MKT:CTO) (the “Company”) today announced the acquisition of an approximately 136,000 square foot grocery-anchored shopping center located at 3563 Alton Rd. in Fort Worth, Texas (the “Property”) for $15.0 million at a 6.28% cap rate. The Property is an in-fill location situated on approximately 10.3 acres and consists of four single-tenant properties and one multi-tenant property situated on three separate, but contiguous, land parcels. The anchor property is an approximately 39,000 square-foot building leased to Albertsons under a triple-net lease with approximately five years remaining at a lease rate well below the current market rental rate. Cook Children’s Health Foundation leases the second largest property, an approximately 38,000 square-foot office building, under a triple-net lease with approximately two years remaining, also at a rental rate below current market rates. The multi-tenant property is approximately 55,000 square-feet and is anchored by Dollar General and Ace Hardware. The Property, in aggregate, is approximately 96% leased with a weighted average remaining lease term of approximately 4.1 years. The purchase price for the Property represents a significant discount to current replacement value and the majority of the in-place rents are significantly below current market rates. The Property is located approximately three miles from downtown Fort Worth and less than a mile from the 10,000+ student campus of Texas Christian University (“TCU”). The Property serves the TCU campus and a dense residential area with a three-mile population of approximately 122,000 people with an average household income of more than $75,000 per annum. John P. Albright, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company stated, “This property represents the purchase of a large land parcel with future renovation possibilities, that is leased to several credit tenants with the potential to increase the yield by going from low in-place rental rates to market rates.” Mr. Albright continued, “With this purchase we have reinvested a substantial portion of the recent $27 million land sale to Minto Communities. This acquisition brings our total 2017 investment activity to approximately $19 million.” Consolidated-Tomoka Land Co. is a Florida-based publicly traded real estate company, which owns a portfolio of income investments in diversified markets in the United States including over 1.8 million square feet of income properties, as well as approximately 8,200 acres of land in the Daytona Beach area. Visit our website at www.ctlc.com. We encourage you to review our most recent investor presentations for year end 2016 pertaining to the results for the quarter and year ended December 31, 2016, available on our website at www.ctlc.com. Certain statements contained in this press release (other than statements of historical fact) are forward-looking statements. Words such as “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “will,” “could,” “may,” “should,” “plan,” “potential,” “predict,” “forecast,” “project,” and similar expressions and variations thereof identify certain of such forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the dates on which they were made. Although forward-looking statements are made based upon management’s expectations and beliefs concerning future developments and their potential effect upon the Company, a number of factors could cause the Company’s actual results to differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. Such factors may include the completion of 1031 exchange transactions, the availability of investment properties that meet the Company’s investment goals and criteria, uncertainties associated with obtaining required governmental permits and satisfying other closing conditions, as well as the uncertainties and risk factors discussed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. There can be no assurance that future developments will be in accordance with management’s expectations or that the effect of future developments on the Company will be those anticipated by management.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The American Venice. Courthouse Architecture. Cattle Ranching Empire. Civil War Diary. Julian Onderdonk’s Lost Years. Texas Politics in Pictures. WWII Internment Camp. Texas Trail Drives. The Cotton Revolution. Independent Booksellers. Where Texas Meets the Sea. Books on these and other subjects relating to Texas history, architecture and culture are winners of the San Antonio Conservation Society’s annual 2017 Publication Awards. Founded in 1924, the San Antonio Conservation Society is one of the oldest and most active community preservation groups in the United States. Beginning with efforts to prevent historic structures from being razed and to preserve such unique sites as the city’s Spanish Colonial missions, the society has been responsible for saving most of the historic attractions that now make San Antonio one of the top tourist destinations in Texas. The Society was integral in the Missions’ nomination as an UNESCO World Heritage Site, initiating the nomination process in 2006 and supporting the nomination until they were awarded UNESCO World Heritage status in 2015. The Society’s support of the Mission includes the recent substantial donation to Los Compadres operation of Mission San Juan Spanish Colonial Farm. The winning authors for 2017 will be honored at a luncheon and award presentation ceremony held on Friday, March 24, 2017 at The Argyle, 934 Patterson Avenue. The public is invited to the event. The Argyle offers free self-parking or valet parking. The event will open with a reception at 10:30 a.m. where attendees will have the opportunity to meet with the authors and other Society members. Lunch begins at 11:30 a.m., followed by the award ceremony. Authors will sign and sell copies of their award-winning books until 1:30 p.m.; guests may bring their own copies to be signed. Reservations are $55 per person; seating is limited. Reservations and payment must be received by Friday, March 17 by registering online at http://www.saconservation.org/awards.aspx or mailing a check to the Society headquarters at 107 King William, San Antonio, 78205. For more information on the awards or the luncheon, the public can call the Conservation Society at 210-224-6163. Conservation Society Publication Award winners for 2017 are (detailed book summaries follow below): “The Society has sponsored this award program for publications since the 1950s to honor those who keep history, culture and preservation alive,” says Janet Dietel, president, San Antonio Conservation Society. “It is gratifying that this award ceremony occurs within days of the anniversary of the Society’s founding on March 22, 1924." Visit the Society website at http://www.saconservation.org for information. American Venice: The Epic Story of San Antonio’s River by Lewis F. Fisher - Lewis Fisher uncovers the evolution of San Antonio’s beloved River Walk. He shares how San Antonians refused to give up on the vital water source that provided for them from before the city’s beginnings. In 1941 neglect, civic uprisings, and bursts of creativity culminated in the completion of a Works Project Administration undertaking designed by Robert H. H. Hugman. The resulting River Walk languished for years but enjoyed renewed interest during the 1968 World’s Fair, held in San Antonio, and has since become the center of the city’s cultural and historical narrative. Fisher shares stories about the River Walk’s evolution including information about the Museum and Mission Reaches, two expansions of the River Walk that are vital to San Antonio’s continued growth as the eighth largest city in the country. (Taken from Trinity University Press) The Train to Crystal City by Jan Jarboe Russell - Focusing her story on two American-born teenage girls who were interned in the Crystal City (Family) Internment Camp, author Jan Jarboe Russell uncovers the details of their years spent in the camp; the struggles of their fathers; their families’ subsequent journeys to war-devastated Germany and Japan; and their years-long attempt to survive and return to the United States, transformed from incarcerated enemies to American loyalists. Their stories of day-to-day life, from the ten-foot high security fence to the armed guards, daily roll call, and censored mail, have never been told. (Taken from Simon and Schuster) Another Year Finds Me in Texas: The Civil War Diary of Lucy Pier Stevens by Vicki Adams Tongate. - One of few women’s diaries from Civil War–era Texas and the only one written by a Northerner, this previously unpublished journal offers a unique perspective on daily life and the ties that transcended sectional loyalties during America’s most divisive conflict. Lucy Pier Stevens, a twenty-one-year-old woman from Ohio, visited her aunt’s family near Bellville, Texas, on Christmas Day, 1859. Little did she know how drastically her life would change on April 4, 1861, when the outbreak of the Civil War made returning home impossible. Stranded in enemy territory for the duration of the war, how would she reconcile her Northern upbringing with the Southern sentiments surrounding her? Lucy Stevens’s diary—one of few women’s diaries from Civil War–era Texas and the only one written by a Northerner—offers a unique perspective on daily life at the fringes of America’s bloodiest conflict. An articulate, educated, and keen observer, Stevens took note of everything—the weather, illnesses, food shortages, parties, chores, schools, childbirth, death, the family’s slaves, and political and military news. As she confided her private thoughts to her journal, she unwittingly revealed how her love for her Texas family and the Confederate soldier boys she came to care for blurred her loyalties, even as she continued to long for her home in Ohio. Showing how the ties of heritage, kinship, friendship, and community transcended the sharpest division in US history, this rare diary and Vicki Adams Tongate’s insightful historical commentary on it provide a trove of information on women’s history, Texas history, and Civil War history (Taken from The University of Texas Press) The Courthouses of Central Texas by Brantley Hightower - This architectural survey of fifty Central Texas courthouses uses consistently scaled elevation and site plan drawings to describe and compare these historic seats of county government for the first time. The county courthouse has long held a central place on the Texas landscape—literally, as the center of the town in which it is located, and figuratively, as the symbol of governmental authority. As a county’s most important public building, the courthouse makes an architectural statement about a community’s prosperity and aspirations—or the lack of them. Thus, a study of county courthouses tells a compelling story about how society’s relationships with public buildings and government have radically changed over the course of time, as well as how architectural tastes have evolved through the decades. A first of its kind, The Courthouses of Central Texas offers an in-depth, comparative architectural survey of fifty county courthouses, which serve as a representative sample of larger trends at play throughout the rest of the state. Each courthouse is represented by a description, with information about date(s) of construction and architects, along with a historical photograph, a site plan of its orientation and courthouse square, and two- and sometimes three-dimensional drawings of its facade with modifications over time. Side-by-side drawings and plans also facilitate comparisons between courthouses. These consistently scaled and formatted architectural drawings, which Brantley Hightower spent years creating, allow for direct comparisons in ways never before possible. He also explains the courthouses’ formal development by placing them in their historical and social context, which illuminates the power and importance of these structures in the history of Texas, as well as their enduring relevance today. (Taken from University of Texas Press) Julian Onderdonk in New York: The Lost Years – The Lost Paintings by James Graham Baker - The Lost Years, the Lost Paintings, James Graham Baker explores the artist’s New York years, so often neglected by previous scholars. Through painstaking research, Baker reveals that Onderdonk painted hundreds of images under pseudonyms during his time in New York. These images not only reveal the means by which the artist struggled to make ends meet, but add another dimension to our understanding of the artist’s oeuvre. It is not possible to appreciate and understand Julian Onderdonk and his art without including these works. Largely composed of landscapes and marine scenes depicting the vanishing rural areas and shorelines around New York City, they show that Onderdonk was more than simply a “bluebonnet painter.” Famed for his bluebonnet landscapes, San Antonio native Julian Onderdonk may be the most well-known artist Texas has ever produced. Onderdonk spent several years outside the state, though, seeking to make a name for himself in New York City. He spent much of his time in New York as the very definition of a starving artist, relying on the help of a wealthy patron to make ends meet. This help did not come without strings attached, though, and Onderdonk employed his artistic talents in order to pay off his debts. In Julian Onderdonk: The Lost Years, the Lost Paintings, James Graham Baker explores the artist’s New York years so often neglected by previous scholars. Through painstaking research, the Bakers assert that Onderdonk painted hundreds of images under pseudonyms during his time in the nation’s artistic capital. These images not only reveal the means by which the artist tried to free himself from his debts, but add another dimension to our understanding of the artist’s oeuvre. Largely composed of landscapes and seascapes picturing southern New York, this body of work shows that Onderdonk was more than simply a “bluebonnet painter." (Taken from Texas State Historical Association) Picturing Texas Politics: A Photographic History from Sam Houston to Rick Perry by Chuck Bailey and Patrick Cox - With rare, previously unpublished photographs and iconic images of politicians from the state’s founders to Ann Richards, George W. Bush, and Rick Perry, here is the first-ever photographic album of Texas politicians and political campaigns. Picturing Texas Politics presents the first photographic album of Texas politicians and political campaigns ever assembled. Chuck Bailey has searched archives, museums, libraries, and private collections to find photographs that have never been published, as well as iconic images, such as Russell Lee’s pictures of one of Ralph Yarborough’s campaigns. These photographs are arranged into four chronological sections, each one introduced by historian Patrick Cox, who also provides informative photo captions. The photographs display power and political savvy from the early Republic to Lyndon Johnson and Bob Bullock; unmatched dedication to Texas in the Hobby and Bush families; and the growing influence of women in politics, from Miriam “Ma” Ferguson to Barbara Jordan, Ann Richards, and Kay Bailey Hutchison. With Sam Houston’s jaguar vest, W. Lee “Pappy” O’Daniel’s hillbilly band, a famous governor with an ostrich, and prominent Texans eating watermelons, shooting guns, and riding horses, this is Texas politics at its liveliest and best. (Taken from University of Texas Press) Rosengren’s Books: An Oasis for Mind and Spirit by Mary Carolyn Hollers George - Rosengren's Books: An Oasis for Mind and Spirit is the story of a great American family of independent booksellers and the important literary institution they created. From 1935 to 1987, the store was located in various downtown San Antonio locations, but it became most well known as the charming book shop behind the Alamo, where it was visited by thousands of bibliophiles from around the world. (Taken from Wings Press) Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850 by Andrew Torget - Seeds of Empire tells the remarkable story of how the cotton revolution of the early nineteenth century transformed northeastern Mexico into the western edge of the United States, and how the rise and spectacular collapse of the Republic of Texas as a nation built on cotton and slavery proved to be a blueprint for the Confederacy of the 1860s. By the late 1810s, a global revolution in cotton had remade the U.S.-Mexico border, bringing wealth and waves of Americans to the Gulf Coast while also devastating the lives and villages of Mexicans in Texas. In response, Mexico threw open its northern territories to American farmers in hopes that cotton could bring prosperity to the region. Thousands of Anglo-Americans poured into Texas, but their insistence that slavery accompany them sparked battles across Mexico. An extraordinary alliance of Anglos and Mexicans in Texas came together to defend slavery against abolitionists in the Mexican government, beginning a series of fights that culminated in the Texas Revolution. In the aftermath, Anglo-Americans rebuilt the Texas borderlands into the most unlikely creation: the first fully committed slaveholders' republic in North America. (Taken from University of North Carolina) The Wests of Texas: Cattle Ranching Entrepreneurs by Bruce M. Shackelford - George, Sol, and Ike West grew up working cattle on the prairies of Lavaca County. At the end of the Civil War, George, the eldest, made his first trail drive, as so many Texans did. But unlike many who made the trip, George saw the venture as the business of moving cattle to market and became a professional drover. His brothers would follow in his footsteps. Throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the West brothers trailed herds on the Great Plains, amassed huge ranches in South Texas, built imposing homes in San Antonio, and even founded a town (George West). Their accomplishments were legendary, but today they have been largely forgotten. The West family's history and achievements are examined in this volume illustrated with photographs and personal effects from the family. “What separates the careful work done by Shackelford and researcher Katherine Nelson Hall from many offerings on legendary families of Texas is his reliance not only on primary sources, letters, and ledgers, but also artifacts, paintings, and photographs the West family has painstakingly gathered and maintained over more than one hundred and fifty years”—from the foreword by Marise McDermott. Noted author Bruce M. Shackelford tells the story of the West family of Lavaca County, forgotten Texas legends. Originally from Tennessee, Washington and Mary West moved to Lavaca County, Texas, in the early 1850s. There they raised three sons who were destined to leave an indelible mark on the Texas cattle industry. At the end of the Civil War, George made his first trail drive. As his brothers Sol and Ike came of age, George brought them into his already growing business of trailing cattle herds north. The brothers became some of the most important drovers in cattle business. In their lifetimes their accomplishments were legendary, but today they have been largely forgotten. Their history and achievements are examined in this beautiful volume illustrated with photographs and personal effects from the family. (Taken from Texas State Historical Association) Where Texas Meets the Sea: Corpus Christi and Its History by Alan Lessoff - Demonstrating how the growth of a midsized city can illuminate urban development issues across an entire region, this exemplary history of Corpus Christi explores how competing regional and cosmopolitan influences have shaped this thriving port and leisure city. A favorite destination of visitors to the Texas coast, Corpus Christi is a midsize city that manages to be both cosmopolitan and provincial, networked and local. It is an indispensable provider of urban services to South Texas, as well as a port of international significance. Its industries and military bases and, increasingly, its coastal research institutes give it a range of connections throughout North America. Despite these advantages, however, Corpus Christi has never made it into the first rank of Texas cities, and a keen self-consciousness about the city’s subordinate position has driven debates over Corpus’s identity and prospects for decades. In this masterful urban history—a study that will reshape the way that Texans look at all their cities—Alan Lessoff analyzes Corpus Christi’s place within Texas, the American Southwest, the western Gulf of Mexico, and the U.S.-Mexican borderlands from the city’s founding in 1839 to the present—a place where westward Anglo expansion overwhelmed the Hispanic settlement process from the south, leaving a legacy of conflicting historical narratives that colors the city’s character even now. Lessoff also explores how competing visions of the city’s identity and possibilities have played out in arenas ranging from artwork in public places to schemes to embellish, redevelop, or preserve the downtown waterfront and North Padre Island. Lessoff demonstrates that Corpus Christi exemplifies the tensions between regional and cosmopolitan influences that have shaped cities across the Southwest. (Taken from University of Texas Press) Texas Tales Illustrated, #2: The Trail Drivers by Mike Kearby and illustrated by Mack White - Drawing upon the increasing popularity of graphic novels among young readers, Texas Tales Illustrated, #2: The Trail Drives is an innovative retelling of the cattle drive era, sure to become an invaluable classroom resource. Author Mike Kearby and illustrator Mack White designed the book for use in seventh grade Texas history courses, in response to a need for more interactive textbooks, which appeal to the learning styles of students in today’s overwhelmingly visual media culture. White’s detailed line drawings recall classic comic-book style and capture the drama and dangers of trailing cattle, while Kearby’s narration is enticing, full of intriguing historic detail. The comic pages are supplemented with five pages of maps depicting the historic cattle trails. The Trail Drives is the second in the Texas Tales series. The first, Texas Tales Illustrated, #1: The Revolution, was published by TCU Press in 2011. (Taken from TCU Press)


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Today, FloSports, the innovator in live digital sports and original content, announced an exclusive partnership with the Big 12 Conference to provide live and on-demand coverage of the Big 12 Championships for Swimming & Diving on FloSwimming.com, Indoor Track & Field on FloTrack.com, Wrestling on FloWrestling.com, and Gymnastics on FloGymnastics.com: “The Big 12 Championships are among the biggest and most competitive events in college sports,” FloSports co-founder and CEO Martin Floreani said. “We’re excited to extend our partnership and strengthen our relationship with the Big 12 Conference. We look forward to showcasing these world-class student-athletes to a global audience of fans.” “The Big 12 is excited to be partnered with FloSports for the production and distribution of four upcoming championships,” Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby said. “Through FloSports, our programs and student-athletes will be exposed to a broad audience of fans.” The Big 12 Swimming and Diving Championship will feature five Texas Longhorns who were Olympians in Rio, including Joseph Schooling, a gold medalist in the 100m Butterfly representing Singapore, Joanna Evans, who competed in the 800m Freestyle representing the Bahamas, and the United States’ Jack Conger, Townley Haas and Clark Smith, all gold medalists in the 4x200 Freestyle Relay. Notable competitors in the Big 12 Indoor Track and Field Championship include Oklahoma State senior Kaela Edwards, a four-time Big 12 champion in the mile, Texas Tech junior Trey Culver, the defending NCAA indoor high jump champion, and Texas sophomore Teahna Daniels, the 2016 NCAA 60m champion. Oklahoma State’s Dean Heil, the defending NCAA Champion at 141 pounds, headlines the Big 12 Wrestling Championship alongside his NCAA Finals opponent, Wyoming’s Bryce Meredith. At the Big 12 Gymnastics Championship, Oklahoma’s Maggie Nichols will be competing. She earned an individual bronze on the floor routine as a member of the 2015 U.S. World Championship team that won gold in Glasgow, Scotland. The partnership between FloSports and the Big 12 Conference officially launched in January 2017 and lasts through the end of each sports’ season in 2017. For more information, visit http://www.FloSports.tv. About FloSports: FloSports, the innovator in live digital sports and original content, partners with event rights holders and governing bodies to unlock a world of sports coverage that true fans have been waiting for. Through live streaming of premier events, original video programming, and weekly studio shows, FloSports is growing the sports, the athletes and the fans. Current verticals under the FloSports header are Wrestling, Grappling, MMA, Elite Fitness, Boxing, Softball, Tennis, Pro Wrestling, Gymnastics, Marching, Basketball, Volleyball, eSports, Rodeo, Climbing, Swimming, Cheerleading, and Track. About Big 12 Conference The Big 12 Conference is comprised of 10 Universities - Baylor, Iowa State, Kansas, Kansas State, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, TCU, Texas, Texas Tech and West Virginia. It also boasts the following affiliate members for its wrestling championship – Air Force, Northern Colorado, North Dakota State, South Dakota State, Utah Valley and Wyoming as well as Denver for its gymnastics championship. The Big 12 is an NCAA Division I intercollegiate athletics conference that encompasses five states with over 38 million people within its geographic footprint. In its 21st year, the Conference has produced over 600 Academic All-America selections and claimed national championship team titles in 17 of its 23 sponsored sports. Its student-athletes and teams have combined for 625 individual NCAA titles and 54 team national championships. Nearly 5,000 student-athletes from across the United States and around the World compete annually under the Big 12 banner. For more information, visit Big12Sports.com and follow the Conference on Facebook (Facebook.com/Big12) and Twitter (@Big12Conference).


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

B2B market intelligence firm, Compass Intelligence is proud to announce the completion and update to its U.S. Business IT Market Expenditures research. The research includes 5-year forecasts from 2016 to 2021 and includes breakouts by size of business, by 9 industries including Mining, Construction, Manufacturing, TCU (Telecom, Communications, Utilities), Wholesale, Retail, FIRE (Finance, Insurance & Real Estate), Services (Professional and General), and Government. Sub-Industry cuts are also available in State and Local Government, Federal Government, Public Safety, Healthcare, and Education (K-12 and higher education). Size of Business cuts includes SOHO, Small Business, Mid-sized Business, and Enterprise. SMB segmentation is also available. The 6 categories include Telecommunications, Computer Hardware, Network Hardware, Applications/Software, IT Personnel, and Services (professional, hosted, managed, cloud, etc). A series of reports will be made available on-demand and published over the course of the next 30 days. Some of the key findings of this research is highlighted below: “Our 11 year old comprehensive B2B database of market metrics, forecasts, and segmentation analysis is being leveraged by some of the top IT/telecom companies globally, so we are excited to present this timely market intelligence for our clients to support planning and execution for 2017,” states CEO of Compass Intelligence, Stephanie Atkinson. Compass Intelligence is unique in that it presents market data customized to the client based on their target markets, positioning, channels, and strategic initiatives. “We are happy to discuss this research with you, and present just the elements specific to your company at affordable fees.” Compass Intelligence, a market analytics and consulting firm, specializes in deep-level market segmentation and actionable research for the high-tech and telecom industries while delivering metrics-driven intelligence and insights. Compass Intelligence provides executive insights, market sizing/modeling, competitive analysis, strategic consulting, research-based marketing support, and expert recommendations on multiple markets. Visit us at http://www.compassintelligence.com. Follow Compass Intelligence on Twitter at @CompassIntel.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

When it was first announced in March last year, the AM-RB 001 was just a collection of promises made by a very excited Andy Palmer. A full styling reveal followed the detail-light announcement three months later, but technical details about the collaboration with Red Bull were still hard to come by. Finally, almost a year after being officially announced, we have concrete technical info about the nuts-and-bolts of the AM-RB 001. OK, this isn't the full specification reveal we wanted, but it certainly paints a clearer picture of the car. To start with, power will come from a hybrid powertrain. At its core is a bespoke 6.5-liter Cosworth V12, hooked up to a lightweight battery system from Croatian manufacturer Rimac. No power output has been announced yet, but Aston Martin has promised a power-to-weight ratio of 1:1, which means the combined output should be around 1,000 hp (746 kW). All this power will be put to the road (track, or polished garage floor) with a bespoke seven-speed paddleshift gearbox from Ricardo. According to Aston Martin the 'box has actually been designed by Red Bull Racing, and fits in with the lightweight ethos imbued in the rest of the car. Just how Ricardo, which also manufactures the dual-clutch in the Bugatti Chiron, plans to make the seven-speeder strong, light and aerodynamic enough to fit in the Adrian Newey-designed underbody of the AM-RB 001 remains to be seen. The whole thing will be managed by a Transmission Control Unit (TCU) from Bosch. Given the planned 1:1 power-to-weight ratio of the car, a serious set of stoppers is required. Alcon and Surface Transforms have been tasked with delivering the carbon-ceramic discs for the AM-RB 001, while Bosch will deliver the Engine Control Unit (ECU) and Electric Stability Programme (ESP) required to manage the big V12 and make sure owners don't go flying backwards into a hedge. Just 150 examples of the AM-RB 001 will be built for the road, with an additional run of 25 track-only versions planned as well.


News Article | February 26, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

OLATHE, Kan. (AP) — The Latest on a deadly shooting at a Kansas bar that some witnesses said was racially motivated (all times local): GoFundMe sites for the families of an Indian man who was killed and two men who were injured in a shooting at a Kansas bar have raised more than $1 million combined. The four sites were set up to help relatives of Srinivas Kuchibhotla pay for expenses in the wake of his shooting death Wednesday at Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe (oh-LAY'-thuh), as well as assist the families of the other victims. Kuchibhotla's friend and co-worker for GPS device-maker Garmin, Alok Madasani, was wounded. Another man, Ian Grillot, was shot when he tried to stop the gunman. A GoFundMe spokeswoman said in an email Saturday that the outpouring to the four funds involves more than 26,000 donations from all U.S. states, the District of Columbia and 39 countries. The suspected gunman, Adam Purinton, remained jailed Saturday on charges of murder and attempted murder. A suburban Kansas City sports bar has reopened, three days after a man shot two Indian men and a third man who tried to intervene, in what some believe was a hate crime. Brandon Blum, a co-owner of Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe (Oh-LAY-thuh), Kansas, told The Associated Press on Saturday that the bar has been a neighborhood fixture for 30 years and that everybody's upset by Wednesday night's attack. Patrons who trickled in for lunch Saturday often hugged each other and staff. Blum declined to discuss the attack in further detail or to say whether the local man charged in the attack, Adam Purinton, was a regular. One of the Indian men was killed and the other two men were wounded. Purinton faces murder and attempted murder charges. Authorities have not said they are investigating the attack as a possible hate crime, but the father of the wounded Indian man said he believes it was one. A longtime neighbor of a Kansas man accused of shooting three people at a bar says the man was a heavy drinker who deteriorated after his father died about 18 months ago. Andy Berthelsen said Saturday that Adam Purinton became "a drunken mess" and bounced among menial jobs over the past year. Berthelsen says that in his 15 years as Purinton's neighbor in Olathe (Oh-LAY-thuh), Kansas, he doesn't recall Purinton making racist remarks or talking about politics. He says Purinton and his father were close and that the father died within weeks of being diagnosed with cancer. Witnesses said Purinton yelled at two Indian men to "get out of my country" before opening fire Wednesday evening. One of the men died and the other was wounded, along with another bar patron. One of two immigrants from India who were shot in a suburban Kansas City bar says the attacker was asking about their visa status shortly before the attack, which some have suggested was a hate crime. Alok Madasani told The New York Times (http://nyti.ms/2lC5YZY ) that while he and Srinivas Kuchibhotla were on the patio of the Olathe, Kansas, bar Wednesday evening, the man asked what type of visa they had and whether they were in the country illegally. They were not. Madasani says he went to get a manager, but when he got back to the patio, the man was already being escorted out. Authorities say the man, 51-year-old Adam Purinton, returned with a gun and shot Madasani, Kuchibhotla and third man who intervened, killing Kuchibhotla. Purinton was arrested hours later in Missouri and is jailed on murder and attempted murder charges. Madasani was treated and released while the other victim, Ian Grillot, remains hospitalized. This item has been corrected to reflect that Madasani and Kuchibhotla were in the country legally, not illegally. A neighborhood bar in suburban Kansas City where one man was killed and two others were injured is scheduled to reopen even as the community tries to recover from an attack that witnesses said was racially motivated. Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe, Kansas, will reopen Saturday. It has been closed since the shooting Wednesday evening while patrons watched a Kansas-TCU basketball game. Witnesses told investigators Adam Purinton yelled at two Indian men to "get out of my country" before opening fire. One man, 32-year-old Srinivas Kuchibhotla, died. Two other men, 32-year-old Alok Madasani and 24-year-old Ian Grillot, were injured. Madasani was released from the hospital while Grillot remains hospitalized. Purinton was arrested early Thursday at a restaurant bar in Clinton, Missouri. He is jailed on murder and attempted murder charges.


News Article | February 25, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

This Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, photo provided by the Johnson County Sheriff's Office in Olathe, Kan., shows Adam Purinton, who has been charged with murder and attempted murder in the Wednesday night shooting at a crowded bar in the Kansas City suburb of Olathe. One man was killed and two were injured in the shooting. (Johnson County Sheriff's Office via AP) OLATHE, Kan. (AP) — The Latest on a deadly shooting at a Kansas bar that some witnesses said was racially motivated (all times local): A man injured in a neighborhood bar shooting in suburban Kansas City that witnesses say was racially motivated says the alleged shooter asked two of the victims about their visa status before later returning and opening fire, killing one man and wounding another. Thirty-two-year-old Alok Madasani told The New York Times Friday night (http://nyti.ms/2lC5YZY ) that while at while at Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe, Kansas, Adam Purinton "asked us what visa are we currently on and whether we are staying here illegally." Both men were educated in the United States and were working here legally. Mr. Madasani told theTimes: "We didn't react. People do stupid things all the time. This guy took it to the next level." Madasani said he went in to get a manager, and by the time he returned to the patio, the man was being escorted out. Thirty-two-year-old Srinivas Kuchibhotla died. Madasani and 24-year-old Ian Grillot, were injured in the shooting. Madasani was released from the hospital while Grillot remains hospitalized. Purinton was arrested early Thursday at a restaurant bar in Clinton, Missouri. He is jailed on murder and attempted murder charges. A neighborhood bar in suburban Kansas City where one man was killed and two others were injured is scheduled to reopen even as the community tries to recover from an attack that witnesses said was racially motivated. Austins Bar and Grill in Olathe, Kansas, will reopen Saturday. It has been closed since the shooting Wednesday evening while patrons watched a Kansas-TCU basketball game. Witnesses told investigators Adam Purinton yelled at two Indian men to "get out of my country" before opening fire. One man, 32-year-old Srinivas Kuchibhotla, died. Two other men, 32-year-old Alok Madasani and 24-year-old Ian Grillot, were injured. Madasani was released from the hospital while Grillot remains hospitalized. Purinton was arrested early Thursday at a restaurant bar in Clinton, Missouri. He is jailed on murder and attempted murder charges.

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