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News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Type 2 diabetes, a prolific killer, is on a steep ascent. According to the World Health Organization, the incidence of the condition has grown dramatically from 108 million cases in 1980 to well over 400 million today. The complex disease occurs when the body's delicate regulation of glucose, a critical metabolite, is disrupted, creating a condition of elevated blood sugar known hyperglycemia. Over time, the condition can damage the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. In a new study, Wei Liu and his colleagues at The Biodesign Institute join an international team, led by Beili Wu from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM), Chinese Academy of Sciences, to explore a central component in glucose regulation. Their findings shed new light on the structure of the glucagon receptor, a highly promising target for diabetes drug development. "The biggest highlight of this paper is that we now have a full-length structure of a class B GPCR," Liu says, referring to a specialized cell-surface receptor able to bind with signaling molecules and influence blood sugar regulation. In addition to ASU, scientists at SIMM, in collaboration with several groups based in China (ShanghaiTech University, Zhengzhou University and Fudan University), United States (University of Southern California, The Scripps Research Institute, and GPCR Consortium), the Netherlands (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Denmark (Novo Nordisk), provided a detailed molecular map of the full-length human glucagon receptor (GCGR) in complex with a modulator (NNC0640) and the antigen-binding antibody fragment (mAb1). The research appears in the advanced online edition of the journal Nature. GPCRs (for G-Protein Coupled Receptors) are specialized receptors adorning cell surfaces. They act like email inboxes for important messages, which arrive at the outer membrane in the form of binding molecules or ligands that affect cell behavior and regulation. Receptor-ligand binding alters the conformation of the receptor and sends messages to the cell's interior, guiding cell function. Pharmaceutical companies hope to develop new drugs that can more accurately and efficiently bind with cell receptors, including diabetes drugs that will be able to halt or reduce the overproduction of glucose. The detailed structure of the glucagon receptor (or "GCGR") examined in the study was solved using the technique of X-ray crystallography. Here, a crystallized protein is struck with X-rays, which form a diffraction pattern that can be reassembled into an extremely detailed picture of the sample. Such information is vital for the development of effective drugs, which must bind with their complex target cell receptors with great specificity. Binding of a specific ligand to the glucagon receptor triggers the release of glucose from the liver during fasting, making this receptor a critical component for maintaining normal glucose levels in the body. Class B GPCRs are essential to numerous physiological processes and serve as important drug targets for many human diseases such as type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, migraine, depression and anxiety. According to team leader and SIMM professor Dr. Beili Wu, "The GCGR structure provides a clear picture of a full-length class B GPCR at high resolution, and helps us understand how different domains cooperate in modulating the receptor function at the molecular level." The GCGR receptor consists of three key components: an extracellular domain (ECD), which protrudes above the surface of the cell, a transmembrane domain (TCD), which is anchored into the cell membrane itself and a region known as the stalk, which connects the two domains and acts as a kind of pivot. (Figure 1 shows the basic structure of the GCGR receptor made up of an extracellular domain, stalk region and transmembrane region. Also pictured is the binding antibody mAb23.) The results of the new study are significant because all three parts of the receptor are essential for its ability to properly bind with its target molecules."Previously we had solved the structure for this GPCR, but we had truncated the whole extracellular domain, which is a critical part for ligand binding," Liu says. Further, although the stalk region contains just 12 amino acids, it is critical for activating and de-activating the GCGR receptor. Progressive diabetes can result in serious health complications, including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. It is currently the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Proper regulation of blood sugar levels relies on two key hormones, which together act like a kind of thermostat. When blood sugar becomes elevated above the normal threshold, insulin is produced by islet cells in the pancreas, acting to keep blood sugar in check. But an even greater risk to the body occurs should blood sugar fall dangerously low. Indeed, low blood sugar or hypoglycemia can be fatal as glucose is the most important brain metabolite, essential for survival. Under conditions of hypoglycemia, another hormone, known as glucagon is produced by pancreatic ?-cells. Glucagon acts as the main counter-regulatory hormone, opposing the action of insulin and switching on glucose production in the liver during fasting. Glucagon influences target tissues through activation of the GCGR receptor. In Type 2 diabetes, insulin production is impaired, leading to elevated blood sugar. Treatment for the disease with supplemental insulin has therefore been a therapy of choice for most patients of the disease. But diabetes also affects glucagon production through dysregulation of the GCGR receptor, causing the overproduction of glucose. The combination of insulin deficiency and glucose excess is typical of Type II diabetes and calls for a multi-pronged approach to addressing the disease. The idea of targeting the GCGR receptor with drugs able to bind with it and switch it off has long been proposed and experiments in rats indicate that the approach is sound. Much more work is required however to perform the same feat in humans. Now, with the complete structure of the receptor in hand, pharmaceutical companies are poised to develop much more effective drugs that specifically target glucose production, while avoiding undesirable side effects. The glucagon receptor examined in the new study is just one member of a superfamily of GPCR surface cell receptors. GPCRs are the largest and most diverse group of membrane receptors in eukaryotes, (cells bearing a nucleus, including human cells). Signals that can be detected by GPCRs include light, peptides, lipids, sugars, and proteins. GPCRs perform a vast array of functions in the human body and their role in modern medicine is vast. Researchers estimate that between one-third and one-half of all marketed drugs act by binding to GPCRs and around 4 percent of the entire human genome is devoted to coding for these structures. While GPCRs bind a dizzying variety of signaling molecules, they share a common architecture that has been conserved over the course of evolution. Animals, plants, fungi, and protozoa all rely on GPCRs to receive information from their environment. Activation of GPCRs is involved with sensation, growth, hormone response and myriad other vital functions. The team used an antibody to stabilize the receptor ECD region, making it less dynamic and more suitable for crystallization, locking the receptor in a particular conformation in which the ECD, TMD and stalk region are held in a specific orientation. The resulting full-length structure exposed by X-ray crystallography differed significantly from earlier predictions of the receptor's shape based on modeling studies. (Antibodies like those used in the new study are being explored as possible ligands used to target the GCGP receptor and control diabetes.) "Now, we know how the ECD interacts with the ligand, so there can be much more directional development of drugs," Liu says. In addition to Liu's expertise in the realm of GPCRs, he and his ASU colleagues contributed sample preparation, data collection and analysis. A number of large pharmaceutical companies, (including Novo Nordisk, which supplied experimental binding compounds used in the current study), are now aggressively pursuing new therapies for diabetes based on the exquisitely detailed GPCR structures beginning to come to light.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Type 2 diabetes, a prolific killer, is on a steep ascent. According to the World Health Organization, the incidence of the condition has grown dramatically from 108 million cases in 1980 to well over 400 million today. The complex disease occurs when the body's delicate regulation of glucose, a critical metabolite, is disrupted, creating a condition of elevated blood sugar known hyperglycemia. Over time, the condition can damage the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. In a new study, Wei Liu and his colleagues at The Biodesign Institute join an international team, led by Beili Wu from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM), Chinese Academy of Sciences, to explore a central component in glucose regulation. Their findings shed new light on the structure of the glucagon receptor, a highly promising target for diabetes drug development. "The biggest highlight of this paper is that we now have a full-length structure of a class B GPCR," Liu says, referring to a specialized cell-surface receptor able to bind with signaling molecules and influence blood sugar regulation. In addition to ASU, scientists at SIMM, in collaboration with several groups based in China (ShanghaiTech University, Zhengzhou University and Fudan University), United States (University of Southern California, The Scripps Research Institute, and GPCR Consortium), the Netherlands (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Denmark (Novo Nordisk), provided a detailed molecular map of the full-length human glucagon receptor (GCGR) in complex with a modulator (NNC0640) and the antigen-binding antibody fragment (mAb1). The research appears in the advanced online edition of the journal Nature. GPCRs (for G-Protein Coupled Receptors) are specialized receptors adorning cell surfaces. They act like email inboxes for important messages, which arrive at the outer membrane in the form of binding molecules or ligands that affect cell behavior and regulation. Receptor-ligand binding alters the conformation of the receptor and sends messages to the cell's interior, guiding cell function. Pharmaceutical companies hope to develop new drugs that can more accurately and efficiently bind with cell receptors, including diabetes drugs that will be able to halt or reduce the overproduction of glucose. The detailed structure of the glucagon receptor (or "GCGR") examined in the study was solved using the technique of X-ray crystallography. Here, a crystallized protein is struck with X-rays, which form a diffraction pattern that can be reassembled into an extremely detailed picture of the sample. Such information is vital for the development of effective drugs, which must bind with their complex target cell receptors with great specificity. Binding of a specific ligand to the glucagon receptor triggers the release of glucose from the liver during fasting, making this receptor a critical component for maintaining normal glucose levels in the body. Class B GPCRs are essential to numerous physiological processes and serve as important drug targets for many human diseases such as type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, migraine, depression and anxiety. According to team leader and SIMM professor Dr. Beili Wu, "The GCGR structure provides a clear picture of a full-length class B GPCR at high resolution, and helps us understand how different domains cooperate in modulating the receptor function at the molecular level." The GCGR receptor consists of three key components: an extracellular domain (ECD), which protrudes above the surface of the cell, a transmembrane domain (TCD), which is anchored into the cell membrane itself and a region known as the stalk, which connects the two domains and acts as a kind of pivot. (Figure 1 shows the basic structure of the GCGR receptor made up of an extracellular domain, stalk region and transmembrane region. Also pictured is the binding antibody mAb23.) The results of the new study are significant because all three parts of the receptor are essential for its ability to properly bind with its target molecules."Previously we had solved the structure for this GPCR, but we had truncated the whole extracellular domain, which is a critical part for ligand binding," Liu says. Further, although the stalk region contains just 12 amino acids, it is critical for activating and de-activating the GCGR receptor. Progressive diabetes can result in serious health complications, including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. It is currently the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Proper regulation of blood sugar levels relies on two key hormones, which together act like a kind of thermostat. When blood sugar becomes elevated above the normal threshold, insulin is produced by islet cells in the pancreas, acting to keep blood sugar in check. But an even greater risk to the body occurs should blood sugar fall dangerously low. Indeed, low blood sugar or hypoglycemia can be fatal as glucose is the most important brain metabolite, essential for survival. Under conditions of hypoglycemia, another hormone, known as glucagon is produced by pancreatic α-cells. Glucagon acts as the main counter-regulatory hormone, opposing the action of insulin and switching on glucose production in the liver during fasting. Glucagon influences target tissues through activation of the GCGR receptor. In Type 2 diabetes, insulin production is impaired, leading to elevated blood sugar. Treatment for the disease with supplemental insulin has therefore been a therapy of choice for most patients of the disease. But diabetes also affects glucagon production through dysregulation of the GCGR receptor, causing the overproduction of glucose. The combination of insulin deficiency and glucose excess is typical of Type II diabetes and calls for a multi-pronged approach to addressing the disease. The idea of targeting the GCGR receptor with drugs able to bind with it and switch it off has long been proposed and experiments in rats indicate that the approach is sound. Much more work is required however to perform the same feat in humans. Now, with the complete structure of the receptor in hand, pharmaceutical companies are poised to develop much more effective drugs that specifically target glucose production, while avoiding undesirable side effects. The glucagon receptor examined in the new study is just one member of a superfamily of GPCR surface cell receptors. GPCRs are the largest and most diverse group of membrane receptors in eukaryotes, (cells bearing a nucleus, including human cells). Signals that can be detected by GPCRs include light, peptides, lipids, sugars, and proteins. GPCRs perform a vast array of functions in the human body and their role in modern medicine is vast. Researchers estimate that between one-third and one-half of all marketed drugs act by binding to GPCRs and around 4 percent of the entire human genome is devoted to coding for these structures. While GPCRs bind a dizzying variety of signaling molecules, they share a common architecture that has been conserved over the course of evolution. Animals, plants, fungi, and protozoa all rely on GPCRs to receive information from their environment. Activation of GPCRs is involved with sensation, growth, hormone response and myriad other vital functions. The team used an antibody to stabilize the receptor ECD region, making it less dynamic and more suitable for crystallization, locking the receptor in a particular conformation in which the ECD, TMD and stalk region are held in a specific orientation. The resulting full-length structure exposed by X-ray crystallography differed significantly from earlier predictions of the receptor's shape based on modeling studies. (Antibodies like those used in the new study are being explored as possible ligands used to target the GCGP receptor and control diabetes.) "Now, we know how the ECD interacts with the ligand, so there can be much more directional development of drugs," Liu says. In addition to Liu's expertise in the realm of GPCRs, he and his ASU colleagues contributed sample preparation, data collection and analysis. A number of large pharmaceutical companies, (including Novo Nordisk, which supplied experimental binding compounds used in the current study), are now aggressively pursuing new therapies for diabetes based on the exquisitely detailed GPCR structures beginning to come to light.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Type 2 diabetes, a prolific killer, is on a steep ascent. According to the World Health Organization, the incidence of the condition has grown dramatically from 108 million cases in 1980 to well over 400 million today. The complex disease occurs when the body's delicate regulation of glucose, a critical metabolite, is disrupted, creating a condition of elevated blood sugar known hyperglycemia. Over time, the condition can damage the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. In a new study, Wei Liu and his colleagues at The Biodesign Institute join an international team, led by Beili Wu from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM), Chinese Academy of Sciences, to explore a central component in glucose regulation. Their findings shed new light on the structure of the glucagon receptor, a highly promising target for diabetes drug development. "The biggest highlight of this paper is that we now have a full-length structure of a class B GPCR," Liu says, referring to a specialized cell-surface receptor able to bind with signaling molecules and influence blood sugar regulation. In addition to ASU, scientists at SIMM, in collaboration with several groups based in China (ShanghaiTech University, Zhengzhou University and Fudan University), United States (University of Southern California, The Scripps Research Institute, and GPCR Consortium), the Netherlands (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Denmark (Novo Nordisk), provided a detailed molecular map of the full-length human glucagon receptor (GCGR) in complex with a modulator (NNC0640) and the antigen-binding antibody fragment (mAb1). The research appears in the advanced online edition of the journal Nature. GPCRs (for G-Protein Coupled Receptors) are specialized receptors adorning cell surfaces. They act like email inboxes for important messages, which arrive at the outer membrane in the form of binding molecules or ligands that affect cell behavior and regulation. Receptor-ligand binding alters the conformation of the receptor and sends messages to the cell's interior, guiding cell function. Pharmaceutical companies hope to develop new drugs that can more accurately and efficiently bind with cell receptors, including diabetes drugs that will be able to halt or reduce the overproduction of glucose. The detailed structure of the glucagon receptor (or "GCGR") examined in the study was solved using the technique of X-ray crystallography. Here, a crystallized protein is struck with X-rays, which form a diffraction pattern that can be reassembled into an extremely detailed picture of the sample. Such information is vital for the development of effective drugs, which must bind with their complex target cell receptors with great specificity. Binding of a specific ligand to the glucagon receptor triggers the release of glucose from the liver during fasting, making this receptor a critical component for maintaining normal glucose levels in the body. Class B GPCRs are essential to numerous physiological processes and serve as important drug targets for many human diseases such as type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, migraine, depression and anxiety. According to team leader and SIMM professor Dr. Beili Wu, "The GCGR structure provides a clear picture of a full-length class B GPCR at high resolution, and helps us understand how different domains cooperate in modulating the receptor function at the molecular level." The GCGR receptor consists of three key components: an extracellular domain (ECD), which protrudes above the surface of the cell, a transmembrane domain (TCD), which is anchored into the cell membrane itself and a region known as the stalk, which connects the two domains and acts as a kind of pivot. (Figure 1 shows the basic structure of the GCGR receptor made up of an extracellular domain, stalk region and transmembrane region. Also pictured is the binding antibody mAb23.) The results of the new study are significant because all three parts of the receptor are essential for its ability to properly bind with its target molecules."Previously we had solved the structure for this GPCR, but we had truncated the whole extracellular domain, which is a critical part for ligand binding," Liu says. Further, although the stalk region contains just 12 amino acids, it is critical for activating and de-activating the GCGR receptor. Progressive diabetes can result in serious health complications, including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. It is currently the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Proper regulation of blood sugar levels relies on two key hormones, which together act like a kind of thermostat. When blood sugar becomes elevated above the normal threshold, insulin is produced by islet cells in the pancreas, acting to keep blood sugar in check. But an even greater risk to the body occurs should blood sugar fall dangerously low. Indeed, low blood sugar or hypoglycemia can be fatal as glucose is the most important brain metabolite, essential for survival. Under conditions of hypoglycemia, another hormone, known as glucagon is produced by pancreatic α-cells. Glucagon acts as the main counter-regulatory hormone, opposing the action of insulin and switching on glucose production in the liver during fasting. Glucagon influences target tissues through activation of the GCGR receptor. In Type 2 diabetes, insulin production is impaired, leading to elevated blood sugar. Treatment for the disease with supplemental insulin has therefore been a therapy of choice for most patients of the disease. But diabetes also affects glucagon production through dysregulation of the GCGR receptor, causing the overproduction of glucose. The combination of insulin deficiency and glucose excess is typical of Type II diabetes and calls for a multi-pronged approach to addressing the disease. The idea of targeting the GCGR receptor with drugs able to bind with it and switch it off has long been proposed and experiments in rats indicate that the approach is sound. Much more work is required however to perform the same feat in humans. Now, with the complete structure of the receptor in hand, pharmaceutical companies are poised to develop much more effective drugs that specifically target glucose production, while avoiding undesirable side effects. The glucagon receptor examined in the new study is just one member of a superfamily of GPCR surface cell receptors. GPCRs are the largest and most diverse group of membrane receptors in eukaryotes, (cells bearing a nucleus, including human cells). Signals that can be detected by GPCRs include light, peptides, lipids, sugars, and proteins. GPCRs perform a vast array of functions in the human body and their role in modern medicine is vast. Researchers estimate that between one-third and one-half of all marketed drugs act by binding to GPCRs and around 4 percent of the entire human genome is devoted to coding for these structures. While GPCRs bind a dizzying variety of signaling molecules, they share a common architecture that has been conserved over the course of evolution. Animals, plants, fungi, and protozoa all rely on GPCRs to receive information from their environment. Activation of GPCRs is involved with sensation, growth, hormone response and myriad other vital functions. The team used an antibody to stabilize the receptor ECD region, making it less dynamic and more suitable for crystallization, locking the receptor in a particular conformation in which the ECD, TMD and stalk region are held in a specific orientation. The resulting full-length structure exposed by X-ray crystallography differed significantly from earlier predictions of the receptor's shape based on modeling studies. (Antibodies like those used in the new study are being explored as possible ligands used to target the GCGP receptor and control diabetes.) "Now, we know how the ECD interacts with the ligand, so there can be much more directional development of drugs," Liu says. In addition to Liu's expertise in the realm of GPCRs, he and his ASU colleagues contributed sample preparation, data collection and analysis. A number of large pharmaceutical companies, (including Novo Nordisk, which supplied experimental binding compounds used in the current study), are now aggressively pursuing new therapies for diabetes based on the exquisitely detailed GPCR structures beginning to come to light.


LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Neural Analytics Inc., a medical device company developing and commercializing technology to measure, diagnose and track brain health, today announced initial results of the EXPEDITE clinical study showing its Transcranial Doppler Technology Platform under research, was more than 95 percent accurate for the early detection of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) due to large vessel occlusion (LVO). The data were presented at the 26th annual European Stroke Conference, taking place from May 24-26 in Berlin. “Current standard of care for stroke diagnosis can be expensive and time consuming, underscoring a significant unmet need for an improved method for first responders and ER physicians to rapidly and accurately assess and triage patients for appropriate clinical intervention,” said Thomas Devlin, MD, PhD, principal study investigator and Medical Director of Erlanger Health System’s Southeast Regional Stroke Center in Chattanooga, Tennessee. “These results show Neural Analytics’ portable diagnostic platform has the potential to fundamentally change how we detect stroke, and could lead to significantly improved patient outcomes as patients are more rapidly triaged for treatment.” The EXPEDITE study, conducted at Erlanger Health System, examined the effectiveness of Neural Analytics’ transcranial Doppler (TCD) platform in assessing patients for stroke. The research study evaluated 45 subjects either experiencing computed tomography angiography (CTA) confirmed Acute Ischemic Stroke due to Large Vessel Occlusion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) or matched healthy controls. TCD scans were recorded in 30 second intervals across multiple depths for each brain hemisphere while patients awaited treatment. Data were analyzed using two different stroke assessment algorithms. A Stroke Asymmetry Index (SAI) which compared depth matched bilateral scans and a Stroke Waveform Morphology Index (SMI) which used an algorithm to asses Doppler waveform morphology changes. Both methods were 96% accurate for assessing large vessel occlusion. “We are encouraged by these study results, demonstrating that under research our novel TCD platform may prove to bridge the significant gap in current stroke detection and management,” said Dr. Robert Hamilton, Chief Scientific Officer of Neural Analytics. “Today, fewer than 10 percent of eligible stroke patients are treated surgically due to the lack of a portable diagnostic device for early detection which would enable earlier stroke diagnoses for first responders and ER physicians.”1,2,4 Neural Analytics also announced the expansion of the EXPEDITE study, projected to enroll 140 patients, to Baptist Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida. Globally each year severe blood flow disorders affect more than 30 million people. Traumatic Brain Injury and stroke contribute the most to the global disease burden for these disorders. Stroke is the second most common cause of death in Europe and about 1.1 million die of stroke in Europe each year.1 Globally stroke affects about 16 million people and kills an estimated 5.7 million, with an annual U.S. healthcare cost of $104 billion.2,3,4,5 There are 14.8 million people affected by Traumatic Brain Injury globally each year, with 2.5 million in the United States. Neural Analytics’ Lucid M1 Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound System™ (Lucid System) is an all-in-one ultrasound system designed for measuring and displaying cerebral blood flow velocities and monitoring of patients with brain disorders. The Lucid System received its CE Mark in January of 2017. The company began selling the Lucid System in Europe in the first quarter of 2017 and opened its European office in Hamburg, Germany in April 2017. The Lucid System is a battery operated medical grade tablet device. It uses a type of ultrasound called Transcranial Doppler (TCD) to assess the brain’s blood vessels from outside the body. This analysis can be performed in the physician’s office, and can help the physician diagnose brain disorders, potentially without the need for additional, more invasive tests. Many significant brain disorders are caused by blood flow disruption. Neural Analytics was founded in 2013 to create products and services to measure, diagnose and track brain health. They combine leading data science with cutting edge hardware to allow first responders and clinicians to accurately assess and monitor brain health issues. Their devices are designed to be portable, autonomous, reliable, and produce precise and objective physiological measurements for medical responder monitoring of neural disorders. More information is available at http://www.neuralanalytics.com. 2. Ganesalingam, J. Cost Utility Analysis of Mechanical Thrombectomy Using Stent Retrievers in Acute Ischemic Stroke. Stroke. 2015 Sep;46(9):2591-8. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.009396. Epub 2015 Aug 6. 3. Saver, J. et. Al. Stent Retriever Thrombectomy after Intraveneous t-PA vs. t_PA alone in stroke. N Engl J Med 2015; 372:2285-2295. 4. Ovbiagele, B. et. Al Forecasting the Future of Stroke in the United States. Stroke. 2013.


The brain monitoring devices global market is expected to grow at mid single digit CAGR to reach $10,011.5 million by 2023. Brain monitoring devices market is mainly classified into products, application and end-users. The product classification consists of electroencephalography (EEG) devices, magnetoencephalography (MEG) devices, transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) devices, intracranial pressure (ICP) monitors, cerebral oximeters, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices, computerized tomography (CT) devices, positron emission tomography (PET) devices, sleep monitoring devices and accessories. The electroencephalography devices market is further segmented into by product type which includes 8-channel, 21-channel, 25-channel, 32-channel, 40-channel and multi-channel and by modality includes standalone/fixed EEG devices and portable EEG devices. The magnetic resonance imaging is divided based upon technology into low and middle field MRI, high field MRI and very high field MRI. Finally computed tomography devices is further classified into low slice CT, medium slice CT and high slice CT depending on the technology. The global brain monitoring devices market by application is segmented into neurodegenerative disorders, brain tumor, sleep disorders, psychiatric behavioural disorders and other applications. The neurodegenerative disorders is sub segmented into epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and dementia whereas sleep disorders is sub classified into sleep apnea, insomnia, hypersomnia and sleep movement disorders. Psychiatric behavioural disorders are sub divided into autism, schizophrenia, dyslexia, bipolar disorders and depression. Other application is sub segmented into surgery, headache disorders, anesthesia and hydrocephalus. The end-users of brain monitoring devices market are hospitals, home care, ambulatory surgical centers and clinics, diagnostic centers and other end users. While increasing focus on minimally invasive brain monitoring procedure and extended application of devices in clinical trials are some of the opportunities that are propelling the growth of the market. However shortage of trained professionals, high cost of complex devices, unfavourable reimbursement policies, stringent regulatory guidelines and competition from local players in emerging markets are hampering the growth of the market. Factors Influencing Market Drivers and Opportunities For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/4bszvd/brain_monitoring Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716 To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-brain-monitoring-devices-market-2017-2023-increasing-focus-on-minimally-invasive-brain-activity-monitoring-procedures---research-and-markets-300441027.html


Receive press releases from IQ4I Research & Consultancy Pvt. Ltd.: By Email IQ4I Research & Consultancy Published a New Report on "Brain Monitoring Devices Global Market – Forecast to 2023" Brain monitoring devices aid in understand the activity of brain and explore structure and functions. Increasing incidence and prevalence neurological diseases, rising awareness, technological advancements/innovations are driving the market growth. Boston, MA, April 25, 2017 --( Brain monitoring devices market is growing at a steady rate, as estimated by IQ4I Research the market is expected to reach $10.01billion by 2023. The major factors driving the brain monitoring device market includes growing incidence and prevalence of neurological disorders, rising awareness about neurodegenerative disorders, growing healthcare spending and technological advancements/innovations offering wider scope of applications for brain monitoring. However, some of the factors like shortage of trained professionals, high cost of complex devices, stringent regulations and unfavorable reimbursement policies may hinder the growth of global brain monitoring device market. The brain monitoring devices global market is segmented based on their products, applications, end users and geography. Among products, sleep monitoring devices holds the largest market share because of the advancements in portable sleep devices technologies and growing incidence of obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep monitoring devices is expected to grow at the single digit mid-CAGR. The global brain monitoring devices application segment is classified into neurodegenerative disorders, brain tumor, psychiatric disorders, sleep disorders and other applications. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by progressive loss of neurons in the central nervous system and Epilepsy, Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington’s disease falls under this category. In 2016, the market was estimated to be dominated by neurodegenerative disorders. The large share of this segment can be attributed to the growing incidence of Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs) globally owing to various factors like, increasing occurrence of falls, blunt trauma and motor vehicle crashes among other causes of TBIs and along with the increasing aging population. Geographically, the bran monitoring devices market is segmented into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of the World. North America region held the largest market share within that United States accounted for the largest share this growth is driven due to its high acceptance of advanced technologies and sophisticated universal treatment facilities. Asia- Pacific region is the fastest growing region due to its increase in healthcare spending and advancements in healthcare facilities, the easy access to advanced healthcare technology. The global brain monitoring devices market is fragmented where key players like GE Healthcare (U.S.), Philips N.V. (Netherland), Siemens Healthineers (Germany), Medtronic (Ireland) and Natus Medical Inc. (U.S.) holding a major share in 2016. The protection of intellectual property rights plays a very important role as a long term strategy for survival of the company and to maintain a competitive advantage. According to IQ4I Analysis, Advanced Brain Monitoring filed the largest number of PCT applications followed by Siemens Healthineers and Philips N.V. at World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). Some of the prominent players in brain monitoring device market include Advanced Brain Monitoring (U.S.), Cadwell Laboratories (U.S.), CAS Medicals Inc. (U.S), Compumedics Limited (Australia), Electrical Geodesics Incorporated (U.S.), Elekta AB (Sweden), GE Healthcare (U.S.), Integra Lifesciences (U.S.), Koninklijke Philips N.V. (Netherland), Masimo corporation (U.S.), Medtronic (Ireland), Natus Medical Inc.(U.S.), Nihon Kohden Corporation (Japan) and Siemens Healthineers (Germany). Boston, MA, April 25, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Brain monitoring devices are used to monitor and diagnose the neurological conditions by exploring the structure and functions of the brain in patients. These devices provide the information of the brain and greater understanding of neurological problems, with possible new treatments. Among brain monitoring devices CT and MRI are the conventional devices which are being used for the structural diagnosis of the brain like tumour, head injury etc., whereas EEG, MEG, TCD, oximeters and ICP monitors are the recent techniques used for the functional imaging of the brain. EEG measures the electrical activity generated by the various cortical layers of the brain whereas, MEG capture the magnetic fields generated by neural activity within the brain. Similarly, TCD measures the velocity of the blood flow through the brain’s blood vessels, oximeters are used to measure the regional cerebral oxygen saturation with in the brain and ICP monitors monitor the intracranial pressure within the skull while treating severe traumatic brain injury in patients. In addition to all these devices, sleep monitoring devices which occupies major share in the brain monitoring devices global market, are being used to understand the person’s sleep physiology and track sleep with the aim of finding patterns and correlations with person’s behaviours.Brain monitoring devices market is growing at a steady rate, as estimated by IQ4I Research the market is expected to reach $10.01billion by 2023. The major factors driving the brain monitoring device market includes growing incidence and prevalence of neurological disorders, rising awareness about neurodegenerative disorders, growing healthcare spending and technological advancements/innovations offering wider scope of applications for brain monitoring. However, some of the factors like shortage of trained professionals, high cost of complex devices, stringent regulations and unfavorable reimbursement policies may hinder the growth of global brain monitoring device market.The brain monitoring devices global market is segmented based on their products, applications, end users and geography. Among products, sleep monitoring devices holds the largest market share because of the advancements in portable sleep devices technologies and growing incidence of obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep monitoring devices is expected to grow at the single digit mid-CAGR.The global brain monitoring devices application segment is classified into neurodegenerative disorders, brain tumor, psychiatric disorders, sleep disorders and other applications. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by progressive loss of neurons in the central nervous system and Epilepsy, Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington’s disease falls under this category. In 2016, the market was estimated to be dominated by neurodegenerative disorders. The large share of this segment can be attributed to the growing incidence of Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs) globally owing to various factors like, increasing occurrence of falls, blunt trauma and motor vehicle crashes among other causes of TBIs and along with the increasing aging population.Geographically, the bran monitoring devices market is segmented into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of the World. North America region held the largest market share within that United States accounted for the largest share this growth is driven due to its high acceptance of advanced technologies and sophisticated universal treatment facilities. Asia- Pacific region is the fastest growing region due to its increase in healthcare spending and advancements in healthcare facilities, the easy access to advanced healthcare technology.The global brain monitoring devices market is fragmented where key players like GE Healthcare (U.S.), Philips N.V. (Netherland), Siemens Healthineers (Germany), Medtronic (Ireland) and Natus Medical Inc. (U.S.) holding a major share in 2016. The protection of intellectual property rights plays a very important role as a long term strategy for survival of the company and to maintain a competitive advantage. According to IQ4I Analysis, Advanced Brain Monitoring filed the largest number of PCT applications followed by Siemens Healthineers and Philips N.V. at World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).Some of the prominent players in brain monitoring device market include Advanced Brain Monitoring (U.S.), Cadwell Laboratories (U.S.), CAS Medicals Inc. (U.S), Compumedics Limited (Australia), Electrical Geodesics Incorporated (U.S.), Elekta AB (Sweden), GE Healthcare (U.S.), Integra Lifesciences (U.S.), Koninklijke Philips N.V. (Netherland), Masimo corporation (U.S.), Medtronic (Ireland), Natus Medical Inc.(U.S.), Nihon Kohden Corporation (Japan) and Siemens Healthineers (Germany). Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from IQ4I Research & Consultancy Pvt. Ltd.


News Article | May 8, 2017
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-- Global brain monitoring market is expected to reach USD 2.0 billion by 2024 from USD 1.2 billion in 2016, at a CAGR of 7.1% in the forecast period 2017 to 2024.The global radiotherapy market is segmented based on therapy, product, application and geography.·         EEG·         TCD·         MEG·         MRI·         CT·         PET·         EMG·         Internal beam radiotherapy·         Systemic radiation therapy·         Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)·         Headache, dementia·         Epilepsy·         ParkinsonBased on geography the market is segmented into 5 geographical regions, North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, South America and rest of the world.·         Nihon Kohden Corporation·         Philips Healthcare, Metronic PLC·         GE Healthcare, Siemens Healthcare·         Natus Medical Incorporated, Compumedics Limited·         Electrical Geodesics, Inc. CAS Medical Systems Inc·         Advanced Brain Monitoring·         B. Braun Medical, Becton·         Dickinson & Company·         DePuySynthes Companies·         Cadwell Industries, Inc·         Masimo Corporation·         Elekta AB (pub)·         Integra LifeSciences Corporation·         Rimed Inc.·         Yokogawa Electric Corporation·         EMOTIV Inc.and Neural AnalyticsReport Access: http://databridgemarketresearch.com/ reports/global- radiot... Data Bridge Market Research4th Floor, Mega Center,Magarpatta City, Pune – 411028Tel: +1-888-387-2818Email: Sales@databridgemarketresearch.comVisit Data Bridge Blog@ http://databridgemarketresearch.com/blog/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/data-bridge-market-research

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