Upland, IN, United States
Upland, IN, United States

Taylor University is a private, interdenominational, evangelical Christian college located in Upland, Indiana, United States. Founded in 1846, it is one of the oldest evangelical Christian colleges in America. Taylor University has been ranked first in U.S. News and World Report’s guide to America’s Best Colleges among 109 Midwest Regional Colleges for five years in a row. Wikipedia.


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News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Enovate Medical, a leading manufacturer of innovative point-of-care products and services designed to improve clinical workflow and enhance patient care, today announced the promotion of Bob Brolund to General Manager and Chief Operating Officer. Brolund will assume day to day leadership of the company while retaining his responsibilities as Chief Financial Officer. Brolund previously spent two years working as the Chief Financial Officer of the business supporting Fred Parks, Enovate’s current Chief Executive Officer. As part of the transition, Parks will transition out of a day to day leadership position with the company to assume the position of President and Chief Executive Officer with Analogic Corporation. Going forward, Parks will maintain a leadership position within Enovate as a member of its board of directors. These changes are effective immediately. “We are thankful to Fred for his leadership of the business over the past year and very pleased to have Bob continue to lead the business day to day,” said David Belluck, General Partner at Riverside Partners and Chairman of Enovate’s Board of Directors. “Bob is an experienced, proven executive who will ensure that we continue to execute on our growth initiatives and maintain Enovate’s leadership position within the industry. Bob’s mission is to ensure steady growth and profitability at Enovate while emphasizing outstanding customer service and continued innovation with our products and services." Prior to Enovate, Brolund served as the Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer for Publishing Group of America (PGOA Media), a multi-media publishing company. Prior to PGOA Media, Brolund was the Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer for Ocean Design Inc., a high technology developer and manufacturer of sub-sea connectivity systems used throughout the offshore oil and gas industry, as well as defense markets. Prior to Ocean Design, he served in senior executive leadership roles with Drexel Heritage Furnishings, Steelcase, Newell Rubbermaid’s Home Hardware Division and Sundstrand Corporation. Mr. Brolund received his B.A. from Taylor University and his M.B.A. from Michigan State. “I am excited to continue my leadership within Enovate and, specifically, to continue the progress that Fred and I have made over the past year building Enovate into a stronger organization and company,” said Brolund. “The company is the North American leader of mobile EHR workstations for patient charting at the bedside with advanced technologies that include the MobiusPower® swappable battery system and the Pulse™ software and management system.” “The Board would like to thank Fred Parks for his service to the company during an important time. He is a strong, proven leader who has played a critical role in the past year strengthening our company and developing the organizational structure to build a great team at Enovate Medical,” said Belluck. ABOUT ENOVATE MEDICAL Enovate Medical is a solutions provider for acute care hospitals that delivers innovative workstation solutions and services that improve clinical workflows and facilitate real time charting at the point-of-care. Enovate Medical’s specialty-focused approach enables healthcare facilities to advance the highest standards of patient care. Thousands of providers rely on Enovate Medical’s solutions to enhance nurse workflows, improve patient care, and deliver on the promise of today’s electronic medical record systems.


This study addressed the potential ability to link landscape indices to stream water quality in a predominately agricultural landscape located in the Mississinewa River watershed, East-Central Indiana. A methodology for developing and analyzing landscape indices using a GIS and remotely sensed and geospatial data was applied to 30 Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) 14-digit subwatersheds. Six indices, three representing natural area extent characteristics and three representing natural area disturbance characteristics were developed. The resulting indices were then tested to determine if they could be linked to water quality variables (Total Phosphorus, Nitrate, E.COLI, and macroinvertebrate [EPT/C] Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera/Chironomidae scores). These variables were gathered from a database of diagnostic studies that only called for a single grab sample during a storm event and a base flow. Using this data provided an opportunity to test the quality of using single grab water samples as response variables. Regressions were not found to be significant for any of the four water quality variables. The findings provoked a discussion on the need for managing variation in water quality samples when attempting to develop successful linkages between landscape indices and stream conditions. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Knuttinen M.-G.,Taylor University
American Journal of Roentgenology | Year: 2015

OBJECTIVE. The purposes ol' this article are to review the causes of pelvic cotigestion syndroitie and the imaging used to make the diagnosis and to summarize the treatment options. CONCLUSION. Pelvic congestion syndrome is one of many causes of chronic pelvic pain. It is thought to arise Iroin ovarian and pelvic venous incompetence. Findings from vari ous noninvasive imaging studies, such as Doppler ultrasound and MRI, in association with the clinical symptoms are critical in establishing the diagnosis. © American Roentgen Ray Society.


Hipp A.L.,Morton Arboretum | Rothrock P.E.,Taylor University | Whitkus R.,Sonoma State University | Weber J.A.,Morton Arboretum
Molecular Ecology | Year: 2010

Chromosome rearrangements may affect the rate and patterns of gene flow within species, through reduced fitness of structural heterozygotes or by reducing recombination rates in rearranged areas of the genome. While the effects of chromosome rearrangements on gene flow have been studied in a wide range of organisms with monocentric chromosomes, the effects of rearrangements in holocentric chromosomes-chromosomes in which centromeric activity is distributed along the length of the chromosome-have not. We collected chromosome number and molecular genetic data in Carex scoparia, an eastern North American plant species with holocentric chromosomes and highly variable karyotype (2n = 56-70). There are no deep genetic breaks within C. scoparia that would suggest cryptic species differentiation. However, genetic distance between individuals is positively correlated with chromosome number difference and geographic distance. A positive correlation is also found between chromosome number and genetic distance in the western North American C. pachystachya (2n = 74-81). These findings suggest that geographic distance and the number of karyotype rearrangements separating populations affect the rate of gene flow between those populations. This is the first study to quantify the effects of holocentric chromosome rearrangements on the partitioning of intraspecific genetic variance. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Konopka A.R.,Rochester College | Harber M.P.,Taylor University
Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews | Year: 2014

Current dogma suggests that aerobic exercise training has minimal effects on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Sports Medicine.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 90.00K | Year: 2012

This award funds the research of Professor Ken Kiers at Taylor University.

The field of particle physics is entering a new era, now that data collection and analysis have begun in earnest at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). LHC experimentalists have already made significant progress in the search for the Higgs boson, and there are suggestive hints that the Higgs may soon be discovered. In addition to searching for the Higgs, the LHC has an ambitious program of research aimed at searching for new physics --- that is, physics beyond the Standard Model. The next few years could witness exciting discoveries as LHC experimentalists map out physics at the TeV energy scale. Professor Kiers will undertake a theoretical investigation focused on constructing observables that can be used to search for new physics and to distinguish among different types of new physics, should physics beyond the Standard Model be discovered. The research will be broken down into several projects. One of the main projects involves using the production and decay of the top quark to search for new physics. A second major project, which will be undertaken as part of a joint theoretical-experimental collaboration, focuses on supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model. Finally, complementary projects are envisioned that could provide analytical tools to help search for or analyze new physics effects in other systems. New experimental results, as they become available, will also provide significant direction regarding which observables or models of new physics will be considered.

The work undertaken by Professor Kiers will also have a significant impact in a broader sense at Taylor University. In particular, the direct involvement of several undergraduate students in the research will enhance the educational experiences of those students and will better prepare them for entrance into top graduate schools. This level of undergraduate research will help the institution attract highly qualified undergraduate students to the physics program and will be particularly helpful in attracting more female and minority students, who are currently underrepresented in the physics program at Taylor.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 533.80K | Year: 2010

CCLI Type 2 ABSTRACT 1047557

This project is an extension of a previous Type 1 project on the use of high altitude balloons in the undergraduate curriculum via the High Altitude Research Platform (HARP). Undergraduate students are able to design and build their own experiments that they launch into near space 20 miles above the earths surface. Students in various STEM classes (engineering, chemistry, biology, mathematics, computer science, physics, meteorology, astronomy, earth science, etc.) are engaged in learning through the unique real-world conditions that traveling to near space provides (extreme variations in temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition, humidity, UV, cosmic radiation, light intensity, views of the earth below, etc.). Data is streamed to the students in real time every second as the balloon ascends and descends via the unique sensors. The complete system is available from StratoStar Systems, LLC. Faculty are able to attain course learning objectives using real-world, hands-on projects in an environment that motivates students. Overall, it provides the opportunity for students to engage in the complete scientific method by formulating a hypothesis, designing an experiment to test the hypothesis, performing the experiment during a balloon launch, analyzing the data, drawing conclusions about their original hypothesis and presenting their findings. Prototyping the implementation of HARP into undergraduate education science method classes for preservice middle school teachers is underway. The future teachers are developing sixth through eighth grade science and mathematics lessons using streaming video and data to field test the lessons.

Faculty members representing over fifty colleges and universities have attended workshops of the use and incorporation of HARP into the undergraduate curriculum and over twenty six of these institutions have acquired a HARP system. Plans are being developed for a National network of schools to foster ongoing dissemination and exchange of curricular materials.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Grant County Economic Growth Council hosted the tenth annual I-69 Collegiate Innovation Challenge on February 10-12 at Plymouth’s Swan Lake Resort. This challenge brings together university students from along the I-69 corridor for a weekend of innovation, problem solving, and entrepreneurship. A total of five teams competed in the challenge. Each team was comprised of a student representative from each participating university. The students were placed into teams Friday afternoon based on the Basadur Creative Profile, a problem-solving assessment, and collaborated for less than 24-hours on a for-profit business solution to the social problem that was selected by the students. The 2017 social problem that the students chose was prison overcrowding. The participating schools in 2017 were Indiana Wesleyan University, Taylor University, Ivy Tech Community College, Huntington University, and Grace College. Here is a complete list of participating students: The Growth Council is proud to announce the competition’s winning team: Kyle Barry of Indiana Wesleyan University; Emma Reese of Huntington University; Emily Guinter of Grace College; Jackson Wilcox of Taylor University; and Carson Adams of Ivy Tech Community College. In this competition, the groups of students were tasked with creating a for-profit business plan that addresses prison overpopulation. The first place winners were each awarded $500 gift cards for their business concept, “Design Again,” a business solution that utilizes the creativity of former inmates to create design and marketing products for small businesses. “It was great to work with different individuals who all had different strengths and ideas,” shared Kyle Barry of the winning team. The second place team members each won $250 gift cards for their proposal of “KP Trucking,” a freight moving company that hires, trains, and mentors prisoners after their sentences are served. The team consisted of Paxton Singer, Sam Petersen, Meyantae Johnson, Contstanze Goelz, and Matthew McNeal. The third place team members were awarded $100 gift cards for their idea, “Life Loan,” a career placement and lending organization. The students on this team included Amy Bowman, Alicia Garnache, Shana Reff, Nathan Hahn, and Annette Hammond. Saturday afternoon, the five teams presented their solutions to a panel of five judges: Matt Tuohy of the Indiana Economic Development Corporation; Iris Hammel, the program director of St. Joe CEO; Charles A. Kennedy of Cambridge Capital Management Corp.; Phil Black of Community Investment Fund of Indiana; and Maggie Phelps of Integrating Woman Leaders Foundation. Following the presentations, the judges selected the winning teams based on criteria that included innovation, profitability, and market potential. After all five of the teams presentations, Maggie Phelps commented on the efforts of the teams by saying, “I was blown away by how knowledgeable the students were, especially considering how little time they had to prepare their plans.” Susie Ripley of the Office of Community and Rural Affairs said, “This is such a great event and it is wonderful that you can share what you all are doing and bring others along to catch that vision!!” The purpose of the I-69 Collegiate Innovation Challenge is to encourage entrepreneurship among students along the I-69 corridor, provide networking opportunities for students and judges, generate creative ideas, and allow for collaboration between universities. The Event was sponsored by each participating university, the Grant County Economic Growth Council, and Indiana Michigan Power.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dan L. Bragg, Ed-D, began journaling when he was 16-years-old and has continued to do so for over 40-years. He knows first-hand the benefits of reflecting on his life through journaling and how it helped him achieve the success and family he has today. As a Superintendent for the Legacy Christian Academy, Bragg has worked with numerous young adults and has heard the concern that many are not continuing their Christian faith into adulthood. With his experience as a leader in the Christian school system and knowing the benefits of journaling, Bragg combined his passions and published his first book, “My Journal: Remembering and Growing – A Biblical Context to Life’s Journey.” He hopes to inspire this generation to reflect on their lives, the goals they want to achieve, and show them God’s way. “The journal is a tool that guides readers through the Bible and provides encouraging and motivational words so they may live the Abundant Life,” said Bragg. “It allows the user to reflect on their life in context to the Bible and improve upon it, grow, learn and overcome.” Individuals orchestrate their own learning and need to be focused on the right priorities and have the proper mindset to get the most benefits out of learning from the Bible. The journal will not only help readers reflect on their lives and goals, but also becomes their archive to help them remember important things as the old testament is filled with the admonition to “Remember!” To learn more about the author and his book please visit, http://www.bleabundantlife.com. “My Journal: Remembering and Growing – A Biblical Context to Life’s Journey” By Dan L. Bragg, Ed-D ISBN: 978-1-5127-6735-3 (hc), 978-1-5127-6734-6 (sc), 978-1-5127-6736-0 (e) Available at the http://www.bleabundantlife.com and Amazon About the author Dan L. Bragg, Ed-D, is a committed Christian school administrator with over 30 years of experience. He has served in a variety of roles including teacher, coach, principal, and superintendent for several prominent Ohio schools. Bragg’s undergraduate degree is from Taylor University, his masters’ degrees from Wright State University and Grace Seminary, and his doctoral degree is from Liberty University. Bragg loves what he gets to do in discipling and training the next generation, and his work and ministry drive him with focused passion. In addition to being a long-time adult Sunday school teacher, he enjoys running, reading, and following his four sons around when they do “life.” He is married to Annette, an outstanding math teacher at Legacy Christian Academy and they reside in Xenia, Ohio.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has released its list of Indiana’s Best Online Schools for 2017. Of the 31 four-year schools ranked, Purdue University, Indiana University, Ball State University, Valparaiso University and Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis came in as the top five. Two of Indiana’s two-year universities, Ancilla College and Ivy Tech Community College, were also honored. “As online educational technology improves, students in Indiana are becoming more inclined to earn degrees outside of a traditional classroom,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “The schools on our list exemplify the best aspects of an online education: high quality curriculum, strong graduation rates and post-college career resources.” To earn a spot on the Best Online Schools list, Iowa colleges and universities must be institutionally accredited, public or private not-for-profit schools. Each college is also ranked on more than a dozen unique data points that include student resources, total online program offerings and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: The Best Online Four-Year Schools in Indiana for 2017 include the following: Anderson University Ball State University Bethel College-Indiana Calumet College of Saint Joseph Grace College and Theological Seminary Huntington University Indiana Institute of Technology Indiana State University Indiana University Indiana University-East Indiana University-Kokomo Indiana University-Northwest Indiana University-Purdue University-Fort Wayne Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis Indiana University-South Bend Indiana University-Southeast Indiana Wesleyan University Manchester University Marian University Oakland City University Ottawa University-Jeffersonville Purdue University Northwest Purdue University-Main Campus Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College Taylor University Trine University-Regional/Non-Traditional Campuses University of Indianapolis University of Saint Francis-Fort Wayne University of Southern Indiana Valparaiso University Vincennes University ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.

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