Taylor Engineering

Alameda, CA, United States

Taylor Engineering

Alameda, CA, United States
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Taylor S.T.,Taylor Engineering
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2017

Controls for variable air volume (VAV) laboratory supply and exhaust systems have traditionally been separate from the primary building automation system (BAS). This was necessary in the early days of VAV labs when the control systems were analog and/ or pneumatic, but it has continued even after these systems converted to modern digital control systems in the late 1990s. The controls have typically been marketed and sold as a package along with the air valves (VAV damper systems) used for supply and exhaust airflow modulation. This typically results in two separate control systems: The lab controls for labs and the BAS for everything else, including non-lab zones, air handlers, heating and cooling plant, etc. In this month's column, I will discuss how to use the BAS to do all controls, allowing dedicated lab controls to be eliminated.


Hydeman M.,Taylor Engineering | Swenson D.E.,Affinity Static Control Consulting
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2010

Mark Hydeman, PE., Fellow ASHRAE and David E. Swenson examine of the background of two guidelines that recommend humidity control in data centers in all climates. They also examine the issues addressed by these guidelines and the practical impacts of controlling humidity in data centers. These two guidelines include ASHRAE's Special Publication Thermal Guidelines for Data Processing Environments and Telecommunication industry Association's ANSI/TIA-942-1 2005, Telecommunications Infrastructure Standard for Data Centers. The authors have investigated the background of the standards and guidelines and interviewed participants in their development. These investigated have revealed that the lower humidity limits have been provided primarily to reduce the potential of electrostatic discharge (ESD) in data centers. It has also been revealed that humidity controls are configured to control absolute humidity at these centers.


Taylor S.T.,Taylor Engineering
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2016

Underfloor air-distribution (UFAD) systems went from the next best thing among HVAC systems in the late 1990s and early 2000s to few and far between after 2010, at least in the San Francisco Bay Area. The reason is simple: they have not worked very well! At least that is the case when using the most common U.S. designs. While the convenience of the underfloor plenum for wiring was a real benefit, and surveys show that occupants perceive much better indoor air quality compared to overhead systems, the hype about improved comfort and energy savings has not been realized for most projects.


Taylor S.T.,Taylor Engineering
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2015

VAV systems are the most common HVAC system for commercial buildings, but design practices vary widely around the country and even among design firms in a given area. Some of the variation is due to local construction practices and labor costs, but most of the variation, in the author's experience, is due simply to how engineers are taught by their mentors in their early years of practice; design techniques and rules-of-thumb are passed down through the generations like family cooking recipes with little or no hard analysis of whether they are optimum from a life-cycle cost perspective. Copyright 2015 ASHRAE.


Taylor S.T.,Taylor Engineering
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2012

This article is the last in a series of five that summarize chilled water plant design techniques intended to help engineers optimize plant design and control with little or no added engineering effort. In this article, optimized control logic was addressed. The logic is very simple and easily programmed into any DDC system controlling the plant. With these sequences properly implemented, chiller plants can perform within a few percent of their theoretical optimum.


Taylor S.T.,Taylor Engineering
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2014

Steven Taylor discusses how to select and control economizer dampers in VAV systems. For VAV systems using Relief Dampers or Relief Fans pressure drop and supply fan energy can be reduced by sequencing the outdoor air and return air dampers. The pressure drop savings is readily apparent at the 50% outdoor air signal: the two dampers are both wide open rather than both half closed. This substantially reduces pressure drop through the mixing plenum, particularly if the dampers have opposed blade action. One important point in selecting economizer outdoor air and return air dampers is that the concept of damper authority does not apply. The damper authority concept applies to dampers that throttle airflow but economizer dampers do not; they are mixing dampers and are not intended to vary overall airflow. For VAV systems using Relief Dampers the most important damper from a sizing perspective is the relief damper (D-1). The relief system relies on build?ing pressurization to cause excess outdoor air to relieve to atmosphere. For VAV systems using Return Fans with Airflow Tracking control, the outdoor air damper can be either PBD or OBD since it is simply open or closed. When using Direct Pressure control, relief dampers should be OBDs and sized for a pressure drop equal to 7% to 15% of the relief path total pressure drop.


Seidl R.,Taylor Engineering
Strategic Planning for Energy and the Environment | Year: 2010

Energy management and control systems (EMCS) for the commercial building sector have undergone dramatic changes over the last decades. Nevertheless, they provide inadequate assistance to owners and operators when it comes to managing energy. Their prime focus has always been managing equipment rather than managing overall building performance. With a renewed national and international focus on building energy consumption, and ambitious targets set by various governmental agencies, systems now have to shift from managing equipment to the much larger picture of providing a useful tool in the context of managing a national energy policy.This article aims to illustrate some of the challenges faced by the engineering, construction, and building operator community when it comes to meeting new state and federal guidelines on energy efficiency.


Taylor S.T.,Taylor Engineering
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2015

For many years, ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 has required that variable air volume (VAV) duct static pressure setpoint be reset based on damper position, and that variable speed pump differential pressure setpoint∗be reset by valve position for systems with direct digital controls (DDC). Copyright 2015 ASHRAE.


Hydeman M.,Taylor Engineering
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2010

The impact of thermal guidelines on datacom facility efficiency is discussed. Thermal guidelines addresses five classes of datacom facilities, such as standard data center, information technology, space, office or lab environment, home or home office, manufacturing environment or store, NEBS, telecommunications central office facility. There are considerable energy savings to be had from operating data centers at the upper end of the thermal envelope. The warmer temperatures increase capacity and efficiency of the cooling systems for DX and chilled water systems. And, in chilled water systems, there are additional savings from the increase in coil that results in a reduction in pumping energy. Water-side economizers and evaporative cooling for systems with air-side economizers, the warmer temperatures increase the hours that these technologies can completely carry the load. In an effort to realize these savings, both research and cross industry collaboration is needed. It is important to have a public forum for the industries to discuss and collaborate on these issues.


Taylor S.T.,Taylor Engineering
ASHRAE Journal | Year: 2011

This article is the third in a series of five that summarize chilled water plant design techniques intended to help engineers optimize plant design and control with little or no added engineering effort. In this article, optimum pipe sizing and optimum design chilled and condenser water temperature selection were discussed. In the next article, cooling tower and chiller selection will be addressed.

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