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North Tonawanda, NY, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 47.04K | Year: 1986

N/A


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 49.45K | Year: 1990

COMPRESSIBLE FLUID SUSPENSIONS ARE WIDELY USED WITHIN THE MILITARY TO PROTECT WEAPONS AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS FROM WEAPONS EFFECT SHOCK AND VIBRATION. THE ADAPTATION OF THIS TECHNOLOGY TO WHEELED AND TRACKED MILITARY VEHICLES WILL PROVIDE SIGNIFICANT IMPROVEMENT IN BOTH HANDLING AND RIDE. A SECOND BENEFIT OF THIS TYPE OF SUSPENSION IS THAT IT CAN EASILY ACCEPT EXTERNAL SENSOR INPUT, TO ALLOW ADAPTIVE RESPONSE CAPABILITY. THIS MEANS THAT SUSPENSION CHARACTERISTICS CAN BE READILY ALTERED TO ACCOMMODATE CHANGES IN VEHICLE GROSS WEIGHT, ROAD CONDITIONS, AND MISSION PROFILES. A THIRD BENEFIT IS THE RELATIVE SIMPLICITY OF THE COMPRESSIBLE FLUID SUSPENSION, AS COMPARED TO BOTH PNEUMATIC AND MECHANICAL DESIGNS HAVING ADAPTIVE CAPABILITY. A SIMPLE COMPRESSIBLE FLUID STRUT PROVIDES MAXIMUM CAPABILITY WITH A MINIMUM NUMBER OF PARTS. THIS PROPOSAL ADDRESSES THE DESIGN OF A COMPRESSIBLE FLUID SUSPENSION HAVING ADAPTIVE SPRING AND DAMPING CHARACTERISTICS. THE CANDIDATE VEHICLE IS THE USMC LAV-25, WITHIN WHICH AN ADEQUATE ENVELOPE EXISTS TO APPLY THE PROPOSED TECHNOLOGY.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 199.00K | Year: 1987

PREVIOUS STUDIES OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS EFFECTS ON ICBM LAUNCH SYSTEMS HAVE BEEN LARGELY CONFINED TO CONSIDERATIONS OF SURFACE OR CONVENTIONAL SILO BASING. THE DEEP BASE CONCEPT DISTINCTLY ALTERS THE SHOCK PULSE INPUT TO THE LAUNCHER FROM THAT EXPECTED ON CONVENTIONAL SYSTEMS, ALLOWING ENTIRELY NEW AND UNIQUE CONCEPTS OF SHOCK ISOLATION TO BE INTRODUCED. THE EFFORT DESCRIBED WITHIN THIS PROPOSAL CONSISTS OF UTILIZING AN EXISTING MULTIPURPOSE COMPUTER MODEL TO STUDY THE EFFECT OF SHOCK PULSES ON A RIGID BODY MASS MODEL OF THE MISSILE TRANSPORTER/LAUNCHER. THE COMPUTER PROGRAM HAS THE ABILITY TO SUBJECT THE MODEL TO THE PULSE FIELDS TYPICAL OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS, AS WELL AS TO STUDY ISOLATION CONCEPTS UTILIZING ESSENTIALLY NON-LINEAR SPRING AND DAMPING ELEMENTS. THE COMPUTER MODEL HAS BEEN SUCCESSFULLY USED TO STUDY THE EFFECTS OF CONVENTIONAL WEAPONS EFFECTS ON SURFACE AND SEABASED WEAPON SYSTEMS, WITH PERFORMANCE VERIFIED BY FULL SCALE TESTING. THE ANALYSIS WILL YIELD AN ISOLATION SYSTEM CONCEPT ALLOWING MAXIMUM PULSE ATTENUATION WITH MINIMUM RATTLESPACE AND ENVELOPE, PLUS PRESENT PARAMETRIC DESIGN DATA ON ISOLATOR CONCEPTS. A DESIGN AND TEST PROGRAM IS DESCRIBED TO ALLOW CONCEPT VERIFICATION AT LOW COST.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 47.07K | Year: 1993

Isolation systems are used on spacecraft to reduce structural loadings from shock and vibration during launch. The launch environment includes both step-like acceleration and random vibration as a combined input. This requires a cumbersome high displacement isolation system when conventional passive spring and damping elements are used. Prior research using active isolation with force drivers has predicted improved performance, but high power requirements and the need for complex sensor systems presents a substantial problem for spacecraft use. This proposal describes an improved isolation system, using semi-active controls, where essentially passive spring and damping elements have their output parameters varied by the control system. This semi-active isolator is both simple and reliable, requiring a minimum of sensors for excellent performance. The design is also inherently fail safe, reverting to passive operation as a redundant operating mode. Computer simulation results are provided, comparing the semi-active isolator with comparable active and passive types. The simulation demonstrates the superiority of the semi-active device. The simulation code is PC based, and is capable of studying all known launch environments, and can be used to select isolator parameters for present and future isolation applications.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 74.12K | Year: 1996

N/A

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