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— The Global Solar Street Lighting Market Research Report 2017is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Solar Street Lighting industry. In a word, This report studies Solar Street Lighting in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with capacity, production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer. Key companies included in this research are Omega Solar, Philips Lighting, Solar Street Lights USA, Su-Kam Power Systems, Bridgelux, Covimed Solar, Dragons Breath Solar, Elecssol, Fosera, KCP Solar, Tata Power Solar Systems, Solar Electric Power Company (SEPCO), SOKOYO, Solektra, Sunna Design, Urja Global, VERYSOL and Shenzhen Spark Optoelectronics S&T. Market Segment by Region, this report splits Global into several key Region, with sales, revenue, market share and growth rate of Solar Street Lighting in these regions, from 2011 to 2022 (forecast), like North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India. Firstly, Solar Street Lighting Market On the basis of product, this report displays the production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, primarily split into Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL) and Light Emitting Diode (LED). On the basis on the end users/applications, this report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, consumption (sales) , market share and growth rate of Solar Street Lighting for each application, including Residential District, Municipal Roads and Others. 7 Global Solar Street Lighting Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 Omega Solar 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.1.2 Solar Street Lighting Product Category, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Product A 7.1.2.2 Product B 7.1.3 Omega Solar Solar Street Lighting Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 Philips Lighting 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.2.2 Solar Street Lighting Product Category, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Product A 7.2.2.2 Product B 7.2.3 Philips Lighting Solar Street Lighting Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 Solar Street Lights USA 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.3.2 Solar Street Lighting Product Category, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Product A 7.3.2.2 Product B 7.3.3 Solar Street Lights USA Solar Street Lighting Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview Figure Picture of Solar Street Lighting Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Production (K Units) and CAGR (%) Comparison by Types (Product Category) (2012-2022) Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Production Market Share by Types (Product Category) in 2016 Figure Product Picture of Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL) Table Major Manufacturers of Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL) Figure Product Picture of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Table Major Manufacturers of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Consumption (K Units) by Applications (2012-2022) Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Consumption Market Share by Applications in 2016 Figure Residential District Examples Table Key Downstream Customer in Residential District Figure Municipal Roads Examples Table Key Downstream Customer in Municipal Roads Figure Others Examples Table Key Downstream Customer in Others Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Market Size (Million USD) , Comparison (K Units) and CAGR (%) by Regions (2012-2022) Figure North America Solar Street Lighting Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2022) Figure Europe Solar Street Lighting Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2022) Figure China Solar Street Lighting Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2022) Figure Japan Solar Street Lighting Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2022) Figure Southeast Asia Solar Street Lighting Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2022) Figure India Solar Street Lighting Revenue (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2022) Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Revenue (Million USD) Status and Outlook (2012-2022) Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Capacity, Production (K Units) Status and Outlook (2012-2022) Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Major Players Product Capacity (K Units) (2012-2017) Table Global Solar Street Lighting Capacity (K Units) of Key Manufacturers (2012-2017) Table Global Solar Street Lighting Capacity Market Share of Key Manufacturers (2012-2017) Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Capacity (K Units) of Key Manufacturers in 2016 Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Capacity (K Units) of Key Manufacturers in 2017 Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Major Players Product Production (K Units) (2012-2017) Table Global Solar Street Lighting Production (K Units) of Key Manufacturers (2012-2017) Table Global Solar Street Lighting Production Share by Manufacturers (2012-2017) Figure 2016 Solar Street Lighting Production Share by Manufacturers Figure 2017 Solar Street Lighting Production Share by Manufacturers Figure Global Solar Street Lighting Major Players Product Revenue (Million USD) (2012-2017) Table Global Solar Street Lighting Revenue (Million USD) by Manufacturers (2012-2017) Table Global Solar Street Lighting Revenue Share by Manufacturers (2012-2017) Table 2016 Global Solar Street Lighting Revenue Share by Manufacturers Table 2017 Global Solar Street Lighting Revenue Share by Manufacturers Table Global Market Solar Street Lighting Average Price (USD/Unit) of Key Manufacturers (2012-2017) Figure Global Market Solar Street Lighting Average Price (USD/Unit) of Key Manufacturers in 2016 Table Manufacturers Solar Street Lighting Manufacturing Base Distribution and Sales Area For more information, please visit http://www.reportsweb.com/global-solar-street-lighting-market-research-report-2017


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: cleantechnica.com

More than 1.4 million homes in the U.S.A. are currently powered by solar, and 3 million additional households are estimated to install PV systems by 2021. Therefore, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SIEA) launched a timely educational campaign for consumers to understand the fundamentals of solar, to ask the right questions from the representatives of solar system installation companies, to compare the offers of solar companies, and to know how much electricity to expect from their PV system over the years. These guidelines also help consumers to understand the terms and costs of purchasing or leasing and of purchasing power from a solar electric system. SEIA also developed simple and understandable disclosure forms covering the full spectrum of residential transactions so that consumers would be able to protect themselves from a vendor when ordering a PV system to install on their property or for their community. SEIA’s president and CEO Abigail Ross Hopper said: “Solar is still a new power choice for millions of Americans, and it’s critical that we cultivate a well-informed customer base. By doing their homework and making use of these tools, consumers and stakeholders alike will feel confident and comfortable in the decision to go solar.” With these developed forms, SEIA achieved an excellent and extremely needed step forward in consumer protection for those 3 million additional households installing PV systems in the next 4 years. The SIEA disclosure forms also advise consumers what information to request about system repair and maintenance, roof warranty and system guaranty. These well-constructed sections are extremely helpful for the consumer to select an installer and to obtain the best and least expensive solar roof for their home. But these sections of the disclosures form do not include what information consumers should ask to protect themselves from the frightening possibility that the guarantor – the installer – goes bankrupt or just simply goes out of business. Unfortunately, this is not a theoretical possibility. Over the past year the number of home owners obtaining loans to buy their PV roof system has increased, and the business is shifting from large installers to regional and local installers. The financial stability of those is usually not very strong, and some of them may go out of business before their guaranty ends. This can happen not only with small regional or local installers, but also with national installers. Sungevity and Verengo Solar went bankrupt, and the very large NRG Home Solar informed people lately on their web site: “We are not offering new installations at this time, but we continue (for how long?) to serve our existing customers.” From this it is evident that bankruptcy etc. of installers is not a theoretical possibility but a real problem that many of the 3 million households who choose to power their home with solar in the next four years could face. If the installer becomes bankrupt or goes out of business the guarantees given to the consumer become worthless. If thereafter the PV system develops a problem, the consumer will have to get it repaired on his own money. In general, the repair of the PV system is easy and not too expensive; however, the consumer will face a very big financial expense if the installer used low quality PV modules which stop functioning and must be replaced. As it is well known low quality PV modules are not fiction either. To protect the consumer, SEIA’s disclosure forms should also include a request that the Installer provide the PV module manufacturer’s name and address and the type of module the installer will use for the solar system. It should also state the life expectancy and the power degradation during the life of the PV modules guaranteed by its manufacturer. Reputable manufacturers guarantee the solar module performance to produce a certain amount of electricity and its yearly degradation for 20 or 25 years. This information is needed to enable the consumer to go directly to the manufacturer if the installer goes out of business. But to know the name of the manufacturer of the PV module is only one step forward to protect the consumer. Most consumers would not know which PV manufacturer is reputable, so the disclosure should have additional questions: “Was the PV module tested for quality and for safety?” If yes, “To what standards were the PV modules tested?” The answer to both questions is simple. The answer to the first question is either yes or no. This answer is clear to the consumer. The second is also simple to answer: 1) Quality: the PV module quality was tested to: IEC 61215 (or a newer version) and 2) safety: the PV module was tested to UL 1703 standards. This answer for the consumer is like it would be written in the Martian language. However, the PV industry needs to interpret this answer for the consumer as is done in many industries that have made it easy to recognize that a product successfully completed the required testing. These industries for this reason established “Quality Marks” (QM) to be displayed on the qualifying product. The consumer knows those Quality Marks, and seeing the QM displayed on the product indicates to them that the product’s quality and safety was tested according to the standards relevant to that product. The disclosure form should ask if the UL safety QM is displayed on the utilized PV modules sold in the U.S.A. The answer to this question should be YES. If the answer is NO, obviously, the PV module may not be safe to use. The Underwriters Laboratory QM is well known to consumers, and they can recognize its QM: It means that the product was successfully tested for safety, and the production was supervised by the Underwriters Laboratory. The disclosure form should also ask if the PV Quality Mark is displayed on the PV module to be used. In the space for the answer it should be written: “PV QM presently is not available.” Despite that the PV QM does exist, it is not being used. It will surprise people that SEIA, the European EPIA, and the Japanese JEPA supported the establishment and promotion of the “PV Quality Mark” which was introduced in 1996: The reason it is not being used now is because several years later, after the year 2000, the PV Quality Mark was abandoned by SEIA, the European EPIA and the Japanese JEPA. Despite this abandonment, surprisingly, the PV Quality Mark still exists and is available, and its reestablishment would be extremely important for consumer protection. As the requirement that a PV module (or product) should be able to display the PV QM does exist, the re-introduction of its use would be simple. The story of its establishment, subsequent abandonment, and that it is still available and could be easily re-established is the following: The prerequisite for a PV QM is that a PV module quality standard should exist. The PV module quality testing standard was developed in the U.S.A. In 1975, the U.S. government initiated a terrestrial PV research and development project, the aim of which was to help the terrestrial PV industry to reduce prices and produce reliable PV modules. That was the famous “JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) Block program.” Its design and its execution were crucial for the utilization of PV solar energy to become a success. In retrospect, this was one of the most important and useful government-sponsored PV programs, because without this program the expected failure of the PV modules would have destroyed the image and usefulness of PV. Manufacturers selling PV modules to the JPL program were forced to adapt a “Quality Manufacturing” system which required periodic product retests and inspections, a forerunner of the presently used global ISO 9000 system which was started only 10 years later. This system also required the production of the PV module to a standard established by JPL, which became the basis of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) globally adapted PV module standard used today. The JPL program ended in 1985. The U.S. government never continued it. Furthermore, the U.S. government never instituted buying only products which were manufactured using a quality management system and tested to the JPL PV standard, as it did with the military “MilSpec” program. The PV industry learned the JPL testing and manufacturing system and during the first decades realized that delivering high quality, reliable PV modules was advantageous for the industry and essential to get the confidence of customers. Failures would be detrimental for PV manufacturers. Therefore, as they did for the JPL program, they tested every module they sold. In the 1990s the situation changed. Many new PV cell/module manufacturers started, and to compete and sell cheaper, they cut corners. To cut cost they abandoned testing, and the quality of their products became poor. That was the time when the quality manufacturers in the U.S.A. formed PowerMark Corporation to develop a PV certification system that customers should be able to differentiate between PV products manufactured using a quality management system and tested to the existing international standard from those which were not. Shortly after PowerMark started to work on a PV certification standard I had a meeting in 1995 with Charlie Gay who was the head of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and supported very much PowerMark’s effort and agreed that PV certification program should be global involving also Europe and Japan. He asked me to try and to arrange this as I had excellent relations with key PV people in those areas. With the help of Wolfgang Palz of the EU Commission and Heinz Ossenbrink head of the PV program at the European Central Research Laboratory in Ispra Italy that PV trade associations SEIA in the U.S.A., the European EPIA, and the Japanese JEPA, supported the development and promotion of the PV certification system and the “Photovoltaic Global approval Program” (PV GAP) was started. The “PV Quality Marks” were established in 1996. This story is described by John Wohlgemuth: “In 1996 a “PV Quality Mark” system was established which is now operated by International Electrotechnical Commission of Conformity Assessment Schemes for Electrotechnical Equipment and Components (IECEE). The IECEE system for PV modules and components included product certification under IEC 61215 (or other relevant IEC standards) and IECEE certification of the manufacture’s quality management system (e.g., ISO 9000). The system also had requirements for periodic product retests and inspections. PV products qualified under the system could display a “PV Quality Mark” that customers should be able to distinguish them from untested and probably less reliable products. Initially several PV module manufacturers, including Solarex, TATA BP Solar (renamed recently as Tata Power Solar Systems Ltd.), ASE (Applied Solar Energy GmbH) and Websol (India), obtained IECEE certification on their products and displayed the “PV Quality Mark” on the product.” The German Feed in Tariff (FiT) was first introduced in 2000, but after the second version was established in 2004, the “solar rush” started, and solar cell and module manufacturers and PV installers appeared like mushrooms after rain. The demand for PV modules became so great that some of the installers were buying anything which had only the PV module “look”. The PV Quality Mark system was abandoned because governments did not specify that only “quality” products could be used for government-supported projects. This is especially true in Germany, where the government did not specify that for customer protection only PV products with “Quality Mark” would qualify to participate in the FiT program despite the fact that in 2004 about 25% of the modules offered were untested. Only the World Bank supported the IECEE quality system and recommended that in the programs they supported, IECEE approved PV products should be used. Even in 2012 the situation was not better. Today the situation is not that bleak. PV certification is taken seriously by the PV industry and government agencies participating in the IEC PV committee, and SEIA is doing what industry associations usually not do, launching a PV consumer protection program. One of the reasons the “PV Quality Mark” program was not promoted properly because when it was transferred to IEC it was put under its existing IECEE program which was established by IEC for certification of many products, e.g. refrigerators, washing machines etc. The “PV Quality Mark” established by SEIA, EPIA, and JEPA was transferred to IECEE, therefore only very little attention was given to PV certification and QM. After hard work by the NREL members of the IEC’s PV standards committee (TC-82), finally in 2016 IEC established IECRE, (RE=Renewable Energy) Conformity Assessment Scheme for Renewable Energy (including PV), and the PV certifications were transferred from IECEE to IECRE. It was anticipated that the applications for the first certifications would be made during the second half of 2016. However as of now, the “PV Quality Mark” is not yet transferred to IECRE. At present it is available free of charge still only from IECEE. (http://www.iecee.org/about/photovoltaics/). The next step would be to also transfer the PV QM to IECRE, and manufacturers could obtain it after they received the PV certification from IECRE. To protect consumers planning to install a PV system on their home or in their neighborhood from the event the installer becomes bankrupt or goes out of business, the SIEA disclosure forms should be amended: The answer to 4) will be “PV QM presently is not available.” until the PV Quality Mark will be transferred to IECRE and it will establish the procedure by which the PV manufacturer can obtain it. Both of these actions should be accelerated. For consumer protection it is also important that after the “PV Quality Mark” is available PV modules without the UL and “PV Quality Marks” and proper certification documents could not be imported into or installed in the U.S.A. Peter F. Varadi is the co-founder in 1973 of SOLAREX Corporation, Rockville, MD (USA), which pioneered the utilization of solar cells (PV) for terrestrial applications. By 1978 it had become the largest PV Company in the world. After it was sold to AMOCO in 1983, Varadi continued to work as solar power consultant, first for SOLAREX, later for the European Commission, The World Bank, NREL, and many other organizations. In 2004, Varadi was awarded the European Photovoltaic Industry Association’s (EPIA) John Bonda prize. Varadi is the author of two books, “SUN Above the Horizon – the Meteoric Rise of the Solar Industry” published in 2014 and “SUN Towards High Noon – Solar Power Transforming Our Energy Future” published in 2017 (www.amazon.com). Check out our new 93-page EV report. Join us for an upcoming Cleantech Revolution Tour conference! Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

LONDON, May 29, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- According to Stratistics MRC, the Global Solar Pumps market is expected to grow from $0.027 billion in 2016 to reach $0.148 billion by 2022 with a CAGR of 32.2%. Growing customer preferences towards solar pumps rather than diesel pumps and raising demand for automated pump systems are some of the factors fuelling the market growth. In addition, due to less availability of its spare parts whenever required and huge capital investment are hindering the growth of the market. Download the full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4917242/ Based on the application segment, agriculture industry leads the market globally as solar pumps are used where there is water scarcity, insufficient electricity and erratic rainfall. However, in product segment the demand for AC submersible pumps is growing rapidly as it is intended to supply groundwater from boreholes and deep wells. Asia Pacific is expected to witness huge growth due to increasing number of photovoltaic installations in China. Some of the key players in global Solar Pumps market include USL, Bright Solar Water Pumps, Tata Power Solar Systems Ltd, CRI Group, Solar Power & Pump Co., LLC, Rainbow Power Co Ltd, American West Windmill & Solar Company, Grundfos, Wenling Jintai Pump Factory, SunEdison, Shakti Solar Pumping System, Lorentz, Greenmax Technology, Conergy, Dankoff Solar, Greenmax Technology and Flowserve. Applications Covered: - Drinking water - Agriculture - Other Applications o Oil & gas o Chemical Product Types Covered: - Alternating Current(AC) AC Floating - Direct Current (DC) surface pump or floating pump set - DC Submersible - AC surface or submersible pump set Regions Covered: - North America o US o Canada o Mexico - Europe o Germany o France o Italy o UK o Spain o Rest of Europe - Asia Pacific o Japan o China o India o Australia o New Zealand o Rest of Asia Pacific - Rest of the World o Middle East o Brazil o Argentina o South Africa o Egypt What our report offers: - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments - Market share analysis of the top industry players - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements Download the full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4917242/ About Reportbuyer Reportbuyer is a leading industry intelligence solution that provides all market research reports from top publishers http://www.reportbuyer.com For more information: Sarah Smith Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com Email: query@reportbuyer.com   Tel: +44 208 816 85 48 Website: www.reportbuyer.com To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/solar-pumps---global-market-outlook-2016-2022-300465058.html


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: cleantechnica.com

Tata Power Solar, part of one of the most reputed industrial conglomerates, has achieved a significant milestone that no other Indian solar module manufacturer has achieved. Tata Power Solar recently announced that it became the first Indian manufacturer to have shipped out 1 gigawatt of solar power modules. The company has seen rapid expansion and growth in production as well as exports over the last few years. Found in 1989 as Tata BP Solar, the company set up it first manufacturing unit in 1991 with a minuscule capacity of 3 megawatts. In 2000, the company achieved Rs 100 crore in sales and also became the first company to upgrade cell manufacturing with a plasma-enhanced vapour deposition system. In 2001, the company achieved Rs 100 crore sales from exports, which increased to Rs 300 crore in 2004. Tata BP Solar increased solar cell manufacturing capacity to 52 megawatts in 2007 and to 84 megawatts in 2009. In 2011, Tata Power Solar became a subsidiary of the Tata Group, following the exit of BP from the joint venture. After that, the company expanded its operations as well as EPC services rapidly to match the expansion in the Indian solar power market. In 2012, the company increased its module manufacturing capacity to 200 megawatts. It also commissioned the world’s largest rooftop solar power project of 12 megawatts of capacity the same year. Last year, the company commissioned a 100 megawatt solar PV project at NTPC’s Anantapur solar power park. The project is the largest solar power project to use Indian-made solar power modules. Tata Power Solar remains one of the largest solar cell and module manufacturing companies in India. As of 31 December 2016, the company had solar cell production capacity of 300 megawatts and solar module manufacturing capacity of 400 megawatts. Buy a cool T-shirt or mug in the CleanTechnica store!   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.


News Article | November 24, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

WiseGuyReports.Com Publish a New Market Research Report On – “Solar Home Lighting 2016 Global Market Share,Growth,Trends & Forecast to 2020”. The analysts forecast the global solar home lighting market to grow at a CAGR of 20% during the period 2016-2020. The segmentation of the global solar home lighting market has been based on two distinct verticals that exist within the broader market. These are based on the technology used and the services provided. The segmentation of the market is as follows:  • Grid-tied solar home lighting systems  • Off-grid solar home lighting systems  In 2015, the solar home lighting market was dominated by the grid-tied systems, which accounted for nearly 86.35% of the global market. The off-grid solar home lighting segment is the underweight in the current market conditions. The segment commands 13.65% share of the global market pie. For more information or any query mail at [email protected] Covered in this report  The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global solar home lighting market for 2016-2020.  The market is divided into the following segments based on geography:  • Americas  • APAC  • EMEA  The report, Global Solar Home Lighting Market 2016-2020, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market.  Key vendors  • Panasonic  • Tata Power Solar Systems  • Shenzhen Yingli New Energy Resources  • Sharp  Other prominent vendors  • GE Renewable Energy  • Su-Kam  • Solarcentury  • Philips  Market driver  • Increased focus on environmental protection  • For a full, detailed list, view our report Market challenge  • Limited sales channels  • For a full, detailed list, view our report  Market trend  • Dominance of emerging markets  • For a full, detailed list, view our report  Key questions answered in this report  • What will the market size be in 2020 and what will the growth rate be?  • What are the key market trends?  • What is driving this market?  • What are the challenges to market growth?  • Who are the key vendors in this market space?  • What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors?  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors? PART 08: Market drivers  • Increased focus on environmental protection  • Higher price of kerosene and falling subsidies  • Decreasing price of lighting units For more information or any query mail at [email protected] Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports features an exhaustive list of market research reports from hundreds of publishers worldwide. We boast a database spanning virtually every market category and an even more comprehensive collection of market research reports under these categories and sub-categories.


News Article | April 29, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

One of India’s leading private sector power generation companies has announced plans to make renewable energy a major part of its operations. Tata Power, part of the famous Indian industrial conglomerate Tata Group, has announced plans to increase its share of renewable energy output from 20% to 35-40% by 2025. The company currently has an installed capacity of 9,156 MW, including 593 MW from wind energy and 60 MW from solar power projects. Tata Power hopes to increase its installed capacity to 20 GW by 2025. A 40% renewable energy share would mean 8 GW capacity. The company has recently increased its participation in solar power auctions. The company secured a project under the Domestic Content Requirement mode in an auction held in the state of Andhra Pradesh late last year. The company can source Indian-made modules from its subsidiary Tata Power Solar to meet the requirements for setting this project. The company successfully participated in the recent 500 MW solar power auction, which is part of a 2 GW solar power park project in the state of Karnataka. The company will develop 100 MW project in the state. Tata Power, which also runs one of the largest thermal power plants in India – Mundra Ultra Mega Power Project – has had regulatory issues with regards to coal-based power plants. The company had planned to import coal from Indonesia to increase the operational efficiency of the power plant. As the prices of Indonesian coal increased, Tata Power struggled to get regulatory approvals to increase the tariff. Last year, Tata Power announced the launch of Tata Power Renewable Energy Limited as a separate company that will own and operate all the renewable energy assets of the parent company. With tremendous improvements in regulatory and financial support for renewable energy development in India, Tata Power seems to have taken the right approach to increase the share of renewable energy in its power generation mix.   Drive an electric car? Complete one of our short surveys for our next electric car report.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


News Article | October 3, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

India’s largest power generation company — government-owned NTPC — is on track to complete one of the largest solar power parks in the country. NTPC Limited is working on a 1 GW solar park at Ananthapur, Andhra Pradesh, in southern India. The company has already allocated and commissioned 250 MW at the solar park and is expected to commission the balance of 750 MW by March 2018. The 250 MW capacity is already operational and was commissioned earlier this year by Tata Power Solar (100 MW), Lanco Solar, BHEL, and Sterling and Wilson (50 MW each). The Anantapuram ultra mega solar power project is planned to have a total capacity of 1.5 GW spread across two sites within the Anantapurum district. The second phase of the solar park will have 750 MW of capacity. Both the phases will be located at district Kunta. The balance of 500 MW capacity will come up at Galiveedu. Apart from this solar park, NTPC is working on several other similar projects in states across India, including Karnataka and Telangana, where solar parks of up to 5 GW in capacity are under construction. Buy a cool T-shirt or mug in the CleanTechnica store!   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

The word “photovoltaic” combines two terms “photo” means light and “voltaic” means voltage. A photovoltaic system uses photovoltaic (PV) cells to directly convert sunlight into electricity. The primary strategy for use of PVs as the electrical power source for a residence is reducing the need for electricity. Refrigerators, air conditioners, electric water heaters, electric ranges, electric dryers, and clothes washers are all large users of electricity. Highly energy conserving alternatives and gas appliances are available to greatly reduce electrical loads. This report is about the market size of the solar PV market in India as the demand for power in India is a on a continuous raise. This report reveals how government is focusing on promoting the use of solar products for achieving grid parity. The report discusses briefly about the technology related governing solar PV in India  India has achieved cumulative installed capacity of 3 GW solar PV in the year ending 2014. Gujarat, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Andhra Pradesh are the top 5 states which contribute more than 85% of the total solar PV capacity installed in the country. The government policies have been the main reason for the growth in the solar energy sector. Manufacturing facilities and the declining prices of the PV modules in India will make the PV market with a boom in the future. According to “India Solar Photovoltaic Market Outlook, 2021”, the installed capacity for solar photovoltaic market in India is expected to reach 1500 MW till 2021. Crystalline Silicon type solar photovoltaics are expected to lead the market in terms of technology. Off grid solar photovoltaic system are expected to cover more than half of the market by 2021. The report reveals that Emmvee, TATA BP Solar and Vikram Solar are the leading players in Indian solar photovoltaic market and their revenue share is expected to grow over the forecasted period, owing to their expansion plans and widening of dealership networks. “India Solar Photovoltaic Market Outlook, 2021” discusses the following aspects of solar PV in India: 1. Executive Summary  2. Global Photovoltaic Market Outlook      2.1. Market Size        2.1.1. By Value            2.1.1.1. Overall Market        2.1.2. By Volume            2.1.2.1. Global Cumulative Installed Capacity            2.1.2.2. Global Annual Installed Capacity            2.1.2.3. PV Electricity Generated            2.1.2.4. By Region by Installed Capacity            2.1.2.5. Shipment by Company            2.1.2.6. Global PV Production            2.1.2.7. PV Installation by Country      2.2. Market Share        2.2.1. By Region        2.2.2. By Installation By Country        2.2.3. By Technology        2.2.4. By End User Segment        2.2.5. By Grid Type      2.3. Production Process      2.4. Pricing Analysis  3. Indian Solar PV Market Outlook      3.1. Market Size        3.1.1. By Value            3.1.1.1. Overall Installed Capacity            3.1.1.2. Cumulative Installed Capacity of cells            3.1.1.3. Cumulative Installed Capacity of modules            3.1.1.4. By Export of PV Modules            3.1.1.5. By Region        3.1.2. By Volume            3.1.2.1. By State wise Installations            3.1.2.2. By State wise Schemes      3.2. Market Share        3.2.1. By Grid Type        3.2.2. By Technology      3.3. Production      3.4. Pricing Analysis  4. India Economic Profile – 2014  5. Raw Material  6. Certifications  7. PEST Analysis  8. Solar Photovoltaic’s Trade Dynamics      8.1. Imports      8.2. Export  9. Market Dynamics      9.1. Key Drivers      9.2. Key Challenges  10. Market Trends & Developments      10.1. SPV Pumps in India      10.2. New Solar Cell Projects in India      10.3. Poly Silicon Material      10.4. Crystalline Silicon Solar cells and modules      10.5. Thin Film Solar Cell Modules      10.6. New Materials for solar cells      10.7. Concentrating Solar Cells and modules      10.8. Storage System  11. Competitive Landscape      11.1. Porters Five Forces      11.2. Company Profiles        11.2.1. Tata Power Solar Pvt. Ltd        11.2.2. Emmvee Solar        11.2.3. Vikram Solar Pvt. Ltd.        11.2.4. Titan Energy System Limited        11.2.5. Moser Baer Solar Ltd        11.2.6. Websol Energy System Ltd        11.2.7. Photon Energy System Ltd.        11.2.8. XL Energy Ltd.        11.2.9. Surana Ventures Ltd.        11.2.10. Premier Solar System Ltd.  12. Strategic Recommendations  13. Disclaimer


News Article | April 23, 2015
Site: news.siliconindia.com

BANGALORE: Tata Power Solar and Manipal University today showcased the prototype of a solar electric car. The car was designed by Manipal University’s students’ twenty-seven member SolarMobile Team, in collaboration with Tata Power Solar who produced the solar panels. The project was named SERVe short for Solar Electric Road Vehicle. The two-seater car weighs 590 Kg and the solar panels weigh just 35 kg (half the weight of conventional solar panels) and provide up to 960 watts of power. The car was designed keeping mobility and commercial viability in mind, so the solar panels have been built to fit around the car's curved shape. This enhances the aerodynamics of the vehicle and enables it to maintain a high performance. The car has a direct solar drive that maintains the cruising speed of 30kmph and is supplemented by extra power from a high-end energy storage system. The car has a top speed of 60 kmph. S. P Giridhar Kini, associate director, Manipal University, says “We are extremely happy to see how our students have combined their passion for green energy, through the launch of SERVe. The industry-academia collaboration is the key to foster innovation among the students. Hence, working with corporates like Tata Power Solar helped our students get technical support and knowledge transfer.” Tata Power Solar managing director and chief executive, Ashish Khanna also responded to economic times,”the project epitomizes our belief in innovation. We not only encourage innovation within our organization but also propagate university participation for this cause.” Also Read: Net Neutrality: NASSCOM Calls for Level Playing Field for Startups Join Twitter Geography Trivia From Space


News Article | February 24, 2015
Site: businesswireindia.com

ABB India became the first company to reach sales of a cumulative capacity of 1GW solar inverters. This milestone was marked today with the roll out of an order for Tata Power Solar’s project for Kiran Energy Solar Power. ABB India commenced local manufacturing of solar inverters in 2012 and has since grown in partnership with key industry customers. Technology leadership complemented with competent indigenization and reliable service, helped ABB India to quickly achieve and maintain pole position in the market over the last three years. The cumulative installed base for central inverters in India reached 3GW in 2014. “Despite having the fifth largest generation capacity in the world, a third of our population has no access to electricity. We hope to be a key component in India’s solar powered future through our solutions spanning the entire solar value chain,” said Bazmi Husain, Managing Director, ABB India. “The ambitious target set for solar power generation capacity in the country – 100GW by 2022 – makes it imperative to leverage all avenues available, be it 300 days of sunshine or opting for efficient and quality components deployed across solar projects.” Changes were made in ABB’s product design keeping in mind the local requirements like demanding environments of high temperatures, dust and humidity. Solar power has great potential to lead the charge of renewables and is rapidly approaching grid parity in many countries. It is emerging to be a key contributor in the energy mix and the government’s drive to provide access to electricity for all. This positions ABB India well in an industry that is set for 10 percent plus annual growth in the country. “Being an early adopter of the latest inverter technology, we collaborated with ABB India from their initial years. Their understanding of the market and reliable product suite has made them a valuable partner in our operations,” said Dr. Arul Shanmugasundram, EVP Projects and Chief Technology Officer, Tata Power Solar. “We look forward to a more comprehensive association in the coming years.” ABB is the leading global supplier of solar photovoltaic (PV) inverters, which play a key role in converting the sun’s energy into electric current. Solar inverters convert solar power direct current (DC) to alternating current (AC) for transmission and distribution. ABB solar inverters improve reliability, efficiency and ease of installations. The inverters range from 100 kW to 1,000 kW and are optimized for cost-efficient multi-megawatt power plants. One gigawatt (1 billion watts) is enough to power up to ~750,000 households, as per western averages. Pushing the renewables envelope, ABB is extending a technological partnership with the pioneering Solar Impulse. On its maiden round-the-world journey – without using a drop of fuel – the solar powered plane stops over in Ahmedabad and Varanasi early this March. This endeavour is not only about pushing the boundaries of aviation but of innovation and what solar power can make possible for the human race, a natural extension of ABB’s ambition of power and productivity for a better world. ABB (www.abb.com) is a leader in power and automation technologies that enable utility and industry customers to improve their performance while lowering environmental impact. The ABB Group of companies operates in around 100 countries and employs about 140,000 people. Photo caption: Mr. Bazmi Husain – Managing Director, ABB India at the announcement of the 1GW milestone achievement  in the solar power Industry

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