Auckland, New Zealand
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Feng J.,The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd | Stanley J.,The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd | Othman M.,Taste Technologies Ltd. | Woolf A.,The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd | And 4 more authors.
Postharvest Biology and Technology | Year: 2013

This study was set up to identify critical maturity indices affecting storage potential of apricots and demonstrate the potential for using non-destructive measurements to segregate harvested crops for sequential marketing. Fruit of two apricot (Prunus armeniaca) cultivars ('Clutha Gold' and 'Genevieve') were harvested and stored for four weeks at 0°C followed by four days of simulated shelf life at 20°C. Fruit colour, acoustic firmness, impact firmness, flesh firmness (FF0), dry matter content and soluble solids content measured non-destructively at harvest were correlated to the flesh firmness measured at the end of refrigerated storage and simulated shelf life (FFFinal) through stepwise regression. The regression models indicated that FF0 is a predominant factor determining FFFinal. According to the exponential model describing the relationship between FF0 and FFFinal, 'Genevieve' and 'Clutha Gold' could be stored at 0°C for four weeks if harvested at firmness above 47 or 56N, respectively. Segregation of harvested crops according to FF0 estimated from VNIR would enable sequential marketing of fruit according to storage potential to reduce fruit loss. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Burdon J.,The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd | Lallu N.,The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd | Haynes G.,The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd | Francis K.,The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd | And 3 more authors.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2015

'Hass' avocado fruit harvested early in the season take a longer time to ripen than fruit harvested later in the season. As the harvest season progresses, the dry matter content of fruit increases. Dry matter can be quantified by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR). The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between fruit dry matter content and the time taken to ripen, and whether NIR can be used to grade fruit for time to ripen. 'Hass' avocado fruit were taken from field bins on the day of harvest from three orchards on three occasions: early, mid and late season. At each harvest, 150 fruit, approximately count 23, were taken per orchard, of which 100 fruit were used to determine time to ripen/dry matter relationship and estimate dry matter by NIR, and 50 fruit were used for NIR calibration. Fruit were allowed to ripen at 20°C without prior cold storage. Throughout the harvest season there was a relationship between higher dry matter and shorter time to ripen, although there was considerable variability in ripening time at any given dry matter (R2=0.25). Within a single harvest, with a limited range of dry matter and time to ripen, there was a less clear relationship between dry matter and the rate of ripening. Fruit from different orchards with similar dry matter may have different ripening times. Given the relationships established, it remains to be demonstrated whether NIR could be routinely used to segregate fruit into commercially useful ripening categories.


Trademark
TASTE TECHNOLOGIES Ltd | Date: 2014-02-04

Testing equipment used for the testing, grading and sorting of horticultural produce; software used for the testing, grading and sorting of horticultural produce; computer based control apparatus for machines for use in controlling the tracking and allocation of produce by sorting; electronic control apparatus for machines for use in controlling the tracking and allocation of produce by sorting; materials testing instruments and machines for testing produce for brix, firmness, internal color, internal defects, dry matter, ripeness, excess sugar and maturity; machines for processing information, namely, machines comprised of Near Infrared (NIR) units, power supply equipment, computer and associated software; grading and sorting equipment relating to the testing, grading and sorting of horticultural produce, namely, sensors for use with machine tools, optical sensors, spectrometers, infrared sensors, infrared scanners, infrared detection apparatus, infrared optical apparatus, machines for measuring brix, firmness, internal color, internal defects, dry matter, ripeness and maturity of produce; machines for the processing of information and collecting data, namely, machines comprised of Near Infrared (NIR) units, computers and software.


Burdon J.,The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd | Wohlers M.,The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd | Pidakala P.,The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd | Laurie T.,Taste Technologies Ltd. | And 2 more authors.
Postharvest Biology and Technology | Year: 2014

The propensity for physiological disorders to arise during low temperature storage of kiwifruit is a significant commercial risk. The potential to use fruit characteristics (flesh colour, soluble solids content (SSC), dry matter and firmness) estimated non-destructively at harvest as markers for the susceptibility of 'Hort16A' kiwifruit to chilling injury (CI) has been investigated for individual fruit. While the fruit that developed CI during storage were some of the least advanced fruit on each orchard, the flesh colour, SSC, firmness and dry matter of the susceptible fruit differed considerably among orchards, such that there was not a clear minimum or maximum threshold for which fruit did or did not develop CI across all orchards. There was a large 'orchard factor' in the susceptibility of fruit to CI that was as important, if not more important, than the flesh colour, SSC, firmness and dry matter values. The 'orchard factor' may derive from a combination of environmental conditions and/or orchard management practices, in conjunction with fruit growth and development. Hence it is concluded that a generally applicable at-harvest prediction of 'Hort16A' fruit susceptibility to CI is not possible from an at-harvest non-destructive estimation of flesh colour, SSC, firmness and dry matter. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

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